Where Are They Now?
LARadio.com
Los Angeles Radio People, R
Compiled by Don Barrett

db@thevine.net

R

Rabbitt, Jimmy: KFI; KRLA, 1969-70; KLAC, 1971; KMET, 1971-72; KBBQ, 1972; KROQ, 1972-73; KMET, 1975; KGBS, 1975; KLAC, 1976; KROQ, 1976-78. Jimmy is living in Colorado and is promoting the release of the Jimmy Rabbitt and Renegade CD.
Rabe, John: KPCC, 2000-14. John is the the health care and housing reporter at KPCC and hosts Offramp.
Racco, Al: KLAC, 1960-61. The former gm of KLAC died of hypertensive cardiovascular disease April 20, 2009. Al was born November 22, 1928, in Warren, Ohio. He started out in L.A. as a sales executive for KLAC and became gsm and general manager. Then in the mid-60's Al joined RKO-General in San Francisco and became gsm at KFRC and then general manager. From there he moved to KGO-San Francisco. He went on to be vp/gm at WABC-New York in 1975.

RACE, Clark: KMPC, 1971-77; KBRT, 1980. Clark’s radio career dovetailed perfectly with the golden era of pop music in the late '50s and throughout the '60s," was how the obituary in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette opened. Clark had an enormously successful 11-year run at KDKA-Pittsburgh when he joined KMPC in 1971 as an heir apparent to the morning heavyweight Dick Whittinghill and lasted until 1977.

In 1972 Clark became the host for ABC/TV's game show The Parent Game. At KMPC he worked mostly overnights and by 1978, Clark had failed to make an impression with Southern California listeners and turned to booze. Clark headed for KYUU-San Francisco and San Diego before returning briefly to the Southland in 1980 to work mornings on the short-lived contemporary Christian music station KBRT. "The Hudson, New York native started his radio career doing baseball broadcasts in Albany. One day, the station manager told him to play some music, so he went out to a record store and simply bought a bunch of music he liked. Listeners liked it, too, and the concept caught on," according to the Post-Gazette story. "A year later, Westinghouse Broadcasting heard what he was doing and offered him a job at KDKA. The 26-year-old came to Pittsburgh in 1959 to host a radio show that lasted until 1970. At its peak, Mr. Race's show captured more than 50 percent of the audience - he simply played what he thought listeners would like. He was one of the first to bring the music of black artists to a wider and more mainstream audience. After meeting Beatles manager Brian Epstein, he was invited to go to London and meet the Beatles. As host of ‘Dance Party,’ he was the Dick Clark of Pittsburgh," from the Post-Gazette.

Clark returned to Pittsburgh in 1986. He and his wife opened a bed and breakfast in Sewickley, fulfilling a longtime dream. A few years later he bought another B&B in Amish country. The couple were known to drive tourists unfamiliar with the area around the back roads. Diane Race said one of her husband's last hopes was that he could discourage others from smoking. Mr. Race's throat cancer was attributed to his longtime tobacco use.Clark died July 27, 1999. He was 66 years old.

Rachtman, Riki: KNAC; KROQ, 1993-96; KLSX, 1996-97 and 2003; KCBS/fm, 2003. Riki had a weekend music show at "Arrow 93."

 

(Dr. Roadmap, Bill Ratner, Kevin Ross, and Dave Robinson)

Radke, Walt: KHJ. Robert W. Morgan called his engineer "Failsafe" (Walt) during the "Boss Radio" glory years. Walt has passed away.
Radlovic, Marko: KPWR, 1989-97; KCMG, 1997-2000, gm; KLAX/KXOL, 2001-11; KABC/KLOS, 2011-14. Marko was promoted to evp/coo for Spanish Broadcasting System in late spring 2005. In December 2006 he added gm duties at KLAX/KXOL. In the summer of 2010, he became the chief revenue officer at Spanish Broadcasting System. In October 2011, Marko took over as the new market manager for the Cumulus stations, KABC/KLOS.
Rahilly, Charlie: KIIS, 1990-2006. Since the spring of 2012, Charlie has been the co-founder of Swan Digital Media, working to unlock the wireless digital network effect of radio and tv stations.
Rall, Ted: KFI, 1998-2000. Ted left his weekend talk show in the late summer of 2000. He's a magazine columnist and cartoonist.

RAMIREZ, Al: KROQ; 1976-79; KLOS, 1979-2005. Al, the overnight personality at KLOS for decades, died suddenly on October 23, 2005. He was 54.

Al was 26 years with KLOS. The Los Angeles native graduated from Loyola High School and started his radio career in San Francisco in 1971 at KSFX. He worked as an intern at KPPC and KYMS in the late 1960s. In 1976 he joined KROQ. Al started his long run at "The Home of Rock 'n' Roll," KLOS, on December 24, 1979. When Al was interviewed for Los Angeles Radio People, he looked back on his long run at KLOS and recalled some highlights: "I co-hosted morning drive with Frazer Smith in 1983. I also produced and announced `The Hollywood Niteshift' hour on KROQ and KLOS, starring Phil Austin, Michael C. Gwynne and Frazer. I had the privilege of filling in as the host of 'Seventh Day' for two years in the absence of 'Uncle' Joe Benson." Since 1973, Al had been a free-lance motion picture and television recording engineer.

“Al Ramirez was one of my family members,” recalled Rita Wilde, pd at KLOS. “We had things we agreed on and we had our disagreements, but we concurred that the music we played was special and we loved this station as passionately as anyone could.

Ramirez, Leslie: KFI, 1998; KACD; KLOS/KABC.
Ramirez, Luis: KFWB, 1993-99. Luis left his KFWB reporter position in 1999 to work for the Voice of America in Washington, DC, then as the agency's bureau chief in Abidjan, West Africa, Beijing, Bangkok and he is currently in Jerusalem.
Ramirez
, Lupita: Lupita is head of Metro Traffic in San Diego.
Ramondo: SEE Raymond Bannister
Ramos, Carol: KFWB, 1994-97; KABC, 1997-2000. Carol left morning drive at KABC in the fall of 2000.
Ramsay, Jon: KWIZ, 1974-76. Jon owns Jon Ramsay Advertising Services in Yorba Linda specializing in radio and tv.
Ramsburg, Jim: KLAC, 1965-68. Jim retired in 1998 and he splits his time between homes in Balsum Lake, Wisconsin and Estero, Florida. Jim is in the Minnesota Broadcasters Hall of Fame. He wrote a book, Network Radio Ratings, 1932-53.

RAMSEY, Dave: KFWB, 2009-14' KEIB, 2014. The financial advisor's syndicated show is heard in afternoon drive at KEIB, 1150 AM the Patriot. He moved across town from CBS to Clear Channel in early 2014. His syndicated show is in its 20th year. “I’m still surprised and honored that people call me at some of the most difficult and personal moments in their lives,” said Ramsey. “Giving people hope for their future and seeing lives changed is why I do this every day.”

Ramsey refers to his radio career as a “happy accident.” In 1992, he was a guest on a radio show on WWTN 99.7 FM. The station was in bankruptcy and could not pay the host – so the host quit. Ramsey and two friends offered to take the time slot in exchange for commercial time that they could sell. His friends went on to other ventures, but Ramsey continued the show and began syndicating it nationwide. Twenty years later, the show is the largest independently owned, operated and syndicated program on radio. 


 

 

(Hilly Rose, Neil Ross, and Riki Rachtman)

Ramsey, Tom: KMPC, 1991. The four-year QB starter for the UCLA Bruins between 1979 and 1982 went into broadcasting Bruin football. He played for the LA Express and then the New England Patriots and Indianapolis Colts. Following a stint as head of corporate sales for the Denver Broncos, Tom works at Fox Sports Net.
Randal, Ted: KFWB, 1961-62. Unknown.
Randall, Chuck: KPFK; KROQ, 1979-81; KMET, 1981-83; KLYY, 1999. Chuck lives in Pasadena, has managed rock groups including The Dead, Huey Lewis, Little Feat, Duran Duran, and Neville Brothers. In 2014, he toured with Alice in Chains and Goo Goo Dolls.
Randall, Dave: KLON, 1981-86; KRTH, 1994-2014. Dave worked weekends and fill-in at "K-Earth" until September 2014.
Randall, Jeff: KMGG, 1983. Since 1997, Jeff has been a special events manager for non-profit organizations, the voice of the Tacoma Rainiers and he does voiceover work. He lives in Seattle.
Randall, Steve: KWST, 1978; KKHR, 1983; KIQQ, 1985. Steve lives in Fresno.
Randolph, Jim: KGFJ, 1965-73. In 1966 and 1967, Billboard voted Jim the #1 personality in the r&b category. He became pd at KGFJ in 1968. Jim died of a heart attack in 1973 and left behind a wife and six children. He grew up in Dallas where his folks owned a drug store.
Rangoonwala, Saaquib: KNNS, 1996-99; KFWB, 1999-2003. His colleagues call him the "biggest name in radio." He was editor's assistant at KFWB.

(Lupita Ramirez, Geraldo Rivera, Beau Rials and Bob Rivers)

Rantel, Al: KABC, 1998-2009. Al retired from KABC in the summer of 2009. He was forced to go on permanent disability following severe injuries in a fall. He hosts an infomercial on the weekend at KABC.
Raphone, Mike: KROQ, 1978-79. Mike Ritto runs All Media Advertising in Orange County.
Rapp, Joel: KFI, 1972. Joel billed himself "Mr. Mother Earth" and he hosted a daily interview talk show. He wrote tv scripts for McHale's Navy and Here's Lucy.
Ratner, Bill: KJOI, 1979-80; KBIG, 1980-85. Bill has been the promo voice for ABC.
Raven-Stark, Bruce: KLAC/KZLA, 1996-97. Bruce lives in Phoenix.
Ray, Bob: KSRF, 1967-68; KMPC, 1968-70. Bob runs a full-service creative ad agency in Saratoga.
Ray, Byron: KIKF, 1984-85. Unknown.
Ray, Doug: KWIZ, 1985-87. Doug was doing mornings in Fresno until the end of 2013. He had Bob Cady host a weekly podcast, radioexiles.com.

(Jim Rome, Fred Roggin, Jeff Riggenbach, and Jim Richards)

Ray, Steve: KLIT, 1991-93; KMPC, 1993-94; KRCI, 1994; KGRB, 1994-95; KRLA, 1998. Steve is the public address announcer for the Potomac Nationals.
Razor: KNAC, 1994. Born Rey deCarolo, Razor started at KNAC working the request phone lines and being a prize van driver. He's currently working at WZTA-Miami.

REAGAN, Maureen: KABC, 1973-74. Maureen, the daughter of the former president and Jane Wyman, worked as a talk show host and her first guest was then-governor Ronald Reagan. She became a crusader for Alzheimer's disease awareness after her father fell ill, died August 8, 2001. She was 60 and suffered from skin cancer. Maureen died peacefully at her Sacramento-area home, said her husband, Dennis C. Revell.

In 1973 and ’74, Maureen worked at KABC. The former president's daughter was described by KABC pd Jim Simon as "our girl at large on the ‘NewsTalk’ station." She started with a weekly show, which eventually turned into an evening slot. Her first guest was then-Governor Reagan. She made her movie debut at the age of 5 in It's A Great Feeling, which starred her mother. Maureen graduated from Marymount College in Arlington, Virginia. Prior to KABC, she worked as a secretary, a PR rep for an airline, and supper club singer.

Reagan, Michael: KABC, 1983-85; KIEV, 1998-2000. Michael hosted a syndicated talk show that was heard locally at KIEV until the fall of 2000.
Reagan, Ron: KMET, 1984; KTLK, 2008-10. The former president's son reviewed movies on "the Mighty Met." He was a talker on KTLK working afternoon drive until the syndicator Air America went out of business.

 

 

 (Robert Roll, Jack Roth, Scott Riley, and Michael Reagan)

Reardon, Sharon: The former traffic reporter for various Southland radio stations is an account executive with LA56 KDOC/TV.
Rebenstorf, John. In 1991 John became the radio play-by-play voice of UCLA football and basketball. Before the start of his second season (1992) with the Bruins, John died at the age of 41. He started out as the voice of Cal State Fullerton where he was a one-man show. John had a history of heart problems and suffered his first heart attack at 28. In the fall of 1985, at 35, he had triple bypass surgery. He was looking forward to his second season at UCLA when he required another heart bypass procedure. He died shortly after the operation.
Red Rooster: KACD, 2000. Red Rooster hosted a blues show at Channel 103.1." Unknown.
Reeb, Trip: KROQ, 1988-2006 and KROQ/KCBS, 2002-03; KROQ, 2003-06. Trip left KROQ in the summer of 2006, following a massive CBS Radio "restructuring." He went on to be the general manager of a cluster in Hawaii. In the fall of 2013, he was named vp/market manager for Hubbard Radio's cluster in Phoenixi.

 

(Craig Rossi, Jimmy Reyes, and Ray Rhodes) 

REED, B. Mitchel: KFWB, 1957-63 and 1965-67; KPPC, 1967-68; KMET, 1968-71; KRLA, 1971-72; KMET, 1972-78; KLOS, 1979-81. B.M.R. played an important role in two key, distinct format successes: Top 40 and AOR "Underground" radio.

Mitch was born Burton Mitchel Goldberg in Brooklyn on June 10, 1926, and entered radio following a decision at the University of Illinois to forgo a career teaching political-science "for the boogie and the glamour of broadcasting." In 1956, he landed the all-night "Birdland Jazz Show" at WOR-New York. In 1957, Mitch moved his "Boy On A Couch" to KFWB and became one of the original "Seven Swingin' Gentlemen" at the launch of the game-changing Top 40 "Color Radio" in 1958.

"The fastest tongue in the West" hosted a #1 rated 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. high energy show using horns, bells and buzzers until February 20, 1963 when he was wooed back to his hometown as one of "The Good Guys" at WMCA-New York: "I'm not talking too fast, you're listening too slow." Again rated #1, "Your Leader" spent time in London developing contacts with Brian Epstein, Derek Taylor and The Beatles, which led to exclusive interviews and advance record pressings that helped break The Beatles in New York.

After his final WMCA show on March 25, 1965, he was cheered by thousands at the airport, a scene that was repeated when he landed in L.A. for his return to KFWB with "The Wide Wide Weird World of BMR." Mitch recognized a music explosion was beginning, and he turned the evening hours into album-oriented rock programming after he met with Tom Donahue at the June 1967 Monterey Pop Festival and discovered their common frustration with radio music restrictions. Tom was pd of pioneer underground rocker KMPX-San Francisco and was looking for an L.A. outlet. Mitch found KPPC in the basement of the Pasadena Presbyterian Church. After the KMPX/KPPC Strike ended in June 1968, Reed and Donahue each supplied KMET with four hours of taped album rock while BMR programmed the rest of KMET, one of the first 24 hour automated music stations. "The Beamer" gained validity for "Underground Radio" from the ad agencies with his afternoon drive show that finally went live in Summer 1969.

Mitch underwent successful coronary bypass surgery in 1978 and left KMET for KLOS. Mitch "kept his mind open and his spirit free" until his death from a lingering heart condition at the age of 56 on March 16, 1983.  

REED, Donn: KABC, 1959-60; KMPC, 1961-81. Donn died after a bout with cancer on December 15, 2003. He was 88.

We hear, in hushed tones, "The suspect is coming out of the liquor store...police have circled the store...he's got a gun...(officer's shout) DROP THE GUN...the suspect stands frozen...he drops the gun and raises his arms.  LET'S MOVE IN. [dialogue of the arrest]...Donn Reed, Nightside." Donn created word pictures, covering the news wearing a trench coat, the microphone hidden in his flashlight, mike cord down his sleeve. Born in Los Angeles, Donn flew for the Air Force during WWII, then worked for CBS radio.

In the late 1950s, while vacationing at Marineland, he went over to a helicopter pilot in the parking lot. "He was flying a Hollywood starlet to the tourist attraction. We started talking aviation and liked each other right off." The pilot was Captain Max Schumacher, who flew search and rescue missions during the war. They decided to report the news from the sky, attracted a business partner, named it Airwatch, then pitched KABC. "We bought a Bell chopper and broadcast every fifteen minutes from over the freeways of Southern California. The vibration of the aircraft was so intense that the tubes in the broadcasting equipment constantly wiggled loose. "We knew we could broadcast about an hour before losing our equipment, so I strapped a walkie-talkie between my legs (it had a range of 4 miles) and we had to get back into that 4-mile range to make our reports. We really pushed the choppers beyond their limits.” Their first accident resulted in broken backs for both Donn and Max. As a result of his injuries, Donn could no longer sit for long periods of time and began covering the city from the ground. Donn bought out his partners and sold "AirWatch" to Gene Autry.

The LA Times' Don Page described Donn: "What he really relishes is investigative reporting, and he does it with the dash and flair of a fiction writer's cop.” In 1970 Donn was named announcer-reporter of the year by the Times. During his illustrious career he won 16 Golden Mikes and 5 L.A. Press Corp awards. "I was most proud of the Edward R. Morrow national award for a documentary called Skid Row Merry-Go-Round.” Retired in 1981, Donn was an avid fisherman, taking his boat out to fresh water whenever weather permited. His favorite fishing holes were the lakes in the High Sierras.

Reed, Eric "Rico": KJLH, 1974-93; KACE, 1993-97; KOST, 1997-2001; KLAC, 2001; KRBV, 2007-08. Rico worked middays at V-100.
Reed, Larry: KMPC, 1969-83; KABC, 1983-2001. Larry is an engineer at KABC.
Reed, Leonard: KDAY. Unknown.
Reed, Phil: KFWB, 1968-73; KNX, 1973-78 and 1991-94; KBIG/KBRT, 1978-87; KNX. Phil is an ordained minister at the Church of the Nazarene in Monrovia.

REED, Tom: KGFJ, 1966-69; KMET, 1969-70; XPRS, 1971-73; KDAY, 1973-76. Born and raised in St. Louis, he arrived in L.A. in 1959 and was on the air at the Los Angeles City College radio station. He also attended UCLA and Windsor University. While working in Kansas City he was the reporter for Down Beat. Tom tells the legend of his nickname "The Master Blaster": "While sitting in a Kansas City bar many years ago, a patron was taunting me, saying, 'You are gonna get blasted outta here.' I said, 'You can't; I am the Master Blaster.'" The next morning, his only recollection of the night before was the "Master Blaster" reference. He went on KPRS/AM&FM-Kansas City with the descriptive line, and the name stuck. In the mid-'60s Tom worked at WLIB-New York and WJLB-Detroit before blasting into the Southland in the little house on Melrose Avenue. (Thanks to the LA Times for the photo)

In 1969, Tom was elected president of the Western States Chapter of the National Association of TV-Radio Announcers.  A 1973 Arbitron showed KDAY was Number 1 in teens. Tom said, "This was the first time in Los Angeles radio history that a black station or radio personality was No. 1." Between 1976 and 1979, Tom was assistant advertising manager and music critic for the Los Angeles Sentinel newspaper. In 1978, he went back to school and earned a master's degree in communications science at Windsor University. Tom has done doctoral work at USC's Annenberg School of Communication. He is a member of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences. 

He has fulfilled a lifelong passion by documenting the rich history of black music in Los Angeles with the 1993 publication of a book called The Black Music History of Los Angeles - Its Roots. Tom credits his own firm roots to strong family values: "My father was a policeman and my mother was a school teacher. My cousin, Elston Howard, was the first black ball player for the New York Yankees.” Tom was the first African American to win an Award of Excellence from the Greater Los Angeles Press Club three years in a row for tv entertainment reporting. Since 1990 Tom has won five Angel awards for excellence in media for his program "For Members Only," the longest running locally produced African American program in L.A. television history. The shows airs on KSCI/Channel 18.

Reeves, Dave: KGIL, 1968-69. Dave lives in Jacksonville, Florida.

     

(Chris Roberts, Jose Rizo, and Randi Rhodes)

Regan, Dennis: KGIL, 1975-76. Dennis owns a voiceover production facility in San Diego, Main Street Productions.
Regan, John: KSUR, 2002-05; KKGO, 2005-06; KGIL, 2010-11. John worked middays at Adult Standards 1260 & 540. He worked mornings at Retro 1260, KGIL and he provides an Oldies Internet r&b/Oldies show.
Reid, Gary: SEE Gary Moore.
Reiff, Scott: SEE Skylord
Reiling, Joe: KLOS, 1977-81; KMET, 1982; KNX/fm, 1983; KLSX, 1988-90; KLOS, 2003-09. Joe works weekends at Classic Rock KLOS.
Reisman, Larry: KEZY, 1977-83. When he left KEZY, Larry worked for Westwood One, IRS Records and The Album Network. He left the radio/music business in 1996.
Reitler, Bill: SEE Bill Wright
Remington, Peter: KXOL/KLAX, 2007. Peter was appointed gm/market manager for the two SBS stations in late spring 2007.
Remy: SEE Remy Maxwell
Reopelle, Tom: KNX, 1990-2012. Tom has been the San Diego reporter for all-News KNX since 1990.
Requio, Roxane: KPWR, 1990-1998; KABC/KLOS, 1998-2014. Roxane is marketing director for the Cumulus Classic Rock and all-Talk stations. The California State University, Fullerton graduate majored in Business Administration
Resnick, Wayne: KFI, 1988-2012. Wayne works weekends and fill-in at KFI.
Reyes, Jimmy: KHHT, 2001-12. Jimmy works afternoons at Art Laboe's KOKO-Fresno. He's now the morning host at HOT 92.3.
Reyes, Meghan: KFI, 1994-95; KLSX, 1995-98; KNX, 1998-2012. Meghan left her midday KNX traffic post in late summer 2012.
Reynolds, Andy: KFWB, 1983-85. Andy is a deputy DA in the Newhall office.
Reynolds, Bo (Pat): KZLA, 1993-97 and 2003-04. Bo rejoined KZLA for afternoons in late 2003 and left in the spring of 2004 and returned to KALC-Denver. He now works afternoon drive at K-Hits in Chicago.
Reynolds, Jack: KGIL, 1969. Jack is vp of Capitol Records' special markets division.
Reynolds, Joey: KMPC, 1980-81; KRTH, 1981-82. Joey worked at WOR-New York.
Reynolds, Steve: KIBB, 1996-97. Steve works production at "Viva 107.1."

 

 

 

(Chuck Randall, Danny Romero, Nicci Ross, and Freddy Rivera)

Rhines, Howard: KFAC, 1950s and 1960s. Unknown.
Rhodes, Dusti: KMET; KWST, 1979. Dusti works afternoons at KKWV-San Francisco.
Rhodes, Randi: KTLK, 2005-13. Randi left the Progressive Talk station in the spring of 2008 following an incident where she called Hillary Clinton a "f-#$%ing whore. She returned and was working noon to 3 p.m. until a format flip to Conservative radio and a re-branding as 1150 AM The Patriot.
Rhodes, Ray: KBIG, 1994-2011. Ray is the producer and mixer at MY/fm.
Rhone, Paul: KRHM, 1959. During the 1960s, Paul appeared in Burke's Law, Petticoat Junction, and The Rebel. In the early 1970s, Paul was working as the lobby security guard/greeter at KHJ TV & AM. Unknown.
Rials, Beau: KSRF, 1988-89; KLSX, 1989-96; KLOS, 1997-2003. Beau is the host/producer of Skil Shop and Into the Mystic. He is the worldwide tv spokesperson for many national clients including Mitsubishi Electric and Cuisinart.
Ricci
, Little: SEE Ricci Filiar
Ricco, Paule: KLOS, 1978; KWST, 1979; KHTZ, 1979-80. Paulie became a paralegal working in the San Fernando Valley.
Rice, Bill: KNOB, 1969; KYMS, 1968; KNAC, 1969; KWIZ, 1969-70. Bill is the midday co-anchor at all-News KOMO-Seattle.
Rich, Allan: KRHM, 1959. Unknown.
Rich, Bobby: KHJ, 1973-74; KHTZ, 1979; KFI, 1981-83. Bobby is pd and works mornings at KMXZ-Tucson.
Rich, Debra: KFI, 1997-99. Debra worked weekend at KFI. She is now living in Phoenix.

 

(Rich "Brother" Robbin, Jim Rittenhouse ['70], Burton Richardson, Tom Rivers, and Eric "Rico" Reed)

RICH, Jai: KBCA, 1969-72; KJLH, 1980-85; KKJZ, 2007-08. James 'Jai Rich' Richardson, whose sonorous voice and lively mixture of Jazz, Gospel as well as r&b helped formulate the background music for Black Los Angeles from the 1960s to the 1970s, died October 24, 2012. He was 78 years old.

In an autobiography written for radio station KJAZZ, where he had returned to radio in 2007, after a 23-year hiatus, Jai talked about a childhood fascination with the broadcast industry at a time when all black music on the radio was lumped together into the category “race music.” That stricture aside, Rich gained an opportunity at an early age to appear on a local show called Blues at Sundown that aired from 3-6 p.m. on a station emanating from Fort Worth, Texas. He was only 9 years old.

Rich was born August 15, 1934 in Marlin, Texas. He was raised and educated in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, graduating from Booker T. Washington High School in 1952. After that early radio experience, Rich said he was hooked. After serving in the Marine Crops as a radio-telephone operator and receiving commendations for outstanding service, he went on to complete formal broadcast training at the Don Martin School of Radio and Television Science, which also produced such graduates as The Real Don Steele and Bob Eubanks.

Rich would become one of the first African Americans to obtain a FCC first-class radio telephone operators license in Southern California. “My career began in 1960 in Los Angeles when fm radio was in its infancy. Those were pioneer days in fm broadcasting,” writes Rich in his autobiography. “It was gratifying and rewarding, because you learned all sides of the business: sales, programming, production; You name it, you did it. “It was small market radio in a major market. We purchased time from the radio station, and then sought local advertisers in order to cover the cost. The local African American community was the hotbed for Jazz and Blues, and a natural supporter in advertising sales."

“During my career, I have enjoyed the pleasure of sharing the stage with some of Jazz’s best and greatest.” The early stations Rich worked for included legendary Jazz KBCA. Rich was also part of the founding crew of djs that created the sound of KJLH radio station—Kindness Love Joy and Happiness. The mantra in the early days was they played the music the people wanted to hear. Among the phrases Rich created were “music designed with you in mind;” “this is the lion’s den, suite 910, welcome my friend to the melodical, lyrical, powerful sounds of Jazz,” and closing his show as “Rozenia’s little boy,” saying “bye-bye, ta, ta, I’m gonna see you later, and tutaonana.”

 After leaving radio, Rich exploited the business side of his talents by becoming the marketing manager at Roscoe’s’ House of Chicken and Waffles and eventually full manager of the South Los Angeles store. He returned to the radio airwaves in Spring 2007 on all-Jazz KJAZZ (88.1 FM) where held down his favorite shift, midnight to 6 a.m. (From OurWeekly.com)

Rich, Merrie: KABC, 1983. Merrie was selected over 2,000 applicants to co-host KABC's "SportsTalk" show. She's now working in England.
Richards, Barry: KGFJ, 1984-85, pd. Barry, aka The Reazar, is a major music consultant to radio and records.
Richards
, Beau: KMEN / KGGI 1987-88. Now ski reporter for Mountain News Network Orinda, California, and freelance voiceover commercial production from his home in Florida.
Richards, Bill: KIIS, 1990-92. Bill is senior vp of programming for Premiere Radio Networks.
Richards, Grahame: KFAC, 1972. While living in Tucson, Grahame died in 1992.
Richards, Jim: KBRT, 1980. Jim is president of Vallie Richards Consulting, based in Atlanta.
Richards, K.M.: KGIL, 1977-78 and 1989-90; KNJO, 1978; KWNK, 1988-89. K.M. works for Pacific Bell in the Residence Service Center.
Richards, Lisa: KACE, 1990. Last heard, Lisa was working at WBLS-New York.
Richards, Mark: KFI, 1985-86. Mark is producing a weekly local tv game show in Las Vegas.

Richards, Neil: KSRF, 1980. Neil, using his real name, Neil Young, is a news anchor at KFYI-Phoenix.
Richards, Ronni: KWIZ, 1981-87. Ronni has an active VO career.
Richards, Stoney: KIIS, 1973-74; KLAC, 1980; KHTZ, 1981; KLAC/KZLA, 1981-94. Stoney is working afternoons at Country WDSY ("Y108")-Pittsburgh and is apd.

 

 

 

(Antoinette Russell, Marko Radlovich, Dianna Rose, and Mike Rivard)

Richardson, Burton: KMPC, 1974; KJOI, 1978-89; KBIG, 1991-92. Burton was the announcer on announcer on Family Feud with John O’Hurley.
Richardson, Liza: KCRW, 1994-2014. Lisa hosts a weekend show on KCRW. 

RICHEY, George: KGBS, 1967. George arrived in the Southland from KAYO-Seattle.

George was a singer on Hickory Records and a regular with the Foggy River Boys on the old Red Foley Ozark Jubilee.

George was born November 30, 1935, and he was raised in Malden, Missouri. He was married to country singer Tammy Wynette from 1978 until her death in 1998.

Richey was a mainstay of the Nashville country music community since the 1960s through his songwriting and record production. Head of Columbia records, in the 1970s, he wrote many major hits for future wife Tammy Wynette and Wynette's then-husband, George Jones, including Jones' A Picture of Me (Without You) and The Grand Tour, and Wynette's 'Til I Can Make It On My Own and You and Me, among many other artists.

Richey served as the musical director for the television show Hee Haw from 1970 to 1977. Upon marrying Wynette, Richey served as Wynette's manager during the 1980s. George retreated from public life after marrying Sheila Slaughter, a Dallas Cowboy cheerleader, and became a social media advocate with his highly popular Facebook page "DON'T SMOKE, DON'T SMOKE, DON'T SMOKE, IT WILL DESTROY YOUR LIFE."

Richey died peacefully on July 31, 2010, following a long battle with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. There was no public memorial, per his request and he was buried peacefully in Nashville near Wynette.

Riddell, Rosie: Rosie works for AirWatch news/traffic service.

RIDDLE, Randy: KNX, 2000-04. Randy was the business editor at KNXNewsradio. He passed away November 16, 2010. He retired to Florida when he left KNX. He had a stroke several years ago and had been unable to speak. “Randy had an unmistakable style and was a credit to our craft,” said Andy Ludlum, program director of KNX. Randy did his special reports from the Pacific Stock Exchange. Unlike other stations which taped earlier market reports and replayed them in the afternoon, KNX Business News was heard "live" until 9 p.m., giving listeners "real time" information on the ever-changing financial world and a recap of the business week. Randy was an honors graduate from Georgetown University. He began his broadcast career in 1968 at UPI Audio in Chicago. He subsequently moved to UPI in New York, there as a news writer for CBS News.

In 1971 he became a writer-producer for CBS's WBBM/TV in Chicago. While in the Windy City he co-produced two award-winning documentaries that won a national Emmy and the coveted DuPont-Columbia University Award. He joined San Francisco's KCBS Newsradio in 1975 as an investigative and consumer reporter. And in 1982 he became a CBS News Correspondent in New York City. Finally, prior to coming to KNX, Riddle joined Public Radio International in 1997 as a business reporter/writer for the highly-acclaimed "Marketplace Radio."

“Randy and I were hired together in 1982 for the new 'young adult' network CBS News Radio in New York launched to counterprogram against NBC Radio's 'The Source', emailed Chris Stanley. “There were eight anchors hired in a clump; Randy and I were two of them. We were fast friends from the day we met. He left CBS News Radio in the early ‘90s. He figured out how to retire early, to Mexico. But that didn't work out as he and his wife Amy had planned, and he wound up back on the market again in the late 90's. He was there when I left the network in New York in '98 and came west, and one of the best things about the move to LA then was seeing him, and getting to work with him, again.” Stanley continued: “Shortly after David G. Hall took over KNX, Randy decided it was time to move on, this time to Florida, but he was among those who'd learned how to do remote broadcasts, and continued to deliver KNX business reports from his Florida home as if they were coming from down the hall at Columbia Square. Eventually that ended and he was enjoying an actual early Florida retirement.

In January '06 he had a serious stroke. Eventually he recovered somewhat, walking and talking to a degree where he felt some of his old pizzazz. Then came a move to Oxford, Mississippi, followed by another move back to Florida two years ago. He was one of the best, most committed, most ferocious newspeople I've ever known, one-of-a-kind, with a one-of-a-kind delivery.” Bill Polish, anchor at KNX, was another wonderful friend of Randy's. He took this refreshingly candid photo of Randy just two months ago while on a visit to Randy's Florida home. "Randy was one of the smartest, quickest, most amazing reporters I've ever met. He was truly a wordsmith. His command of the English language was unbelievable. When confronted with hypocrisy or lies, his eyes would literally flash. But when he laughed, the whole room did too. When I'd ask him how things were going, he'd flash that big smile, wave a hand toward me and say, 'Everything is tickety-boo!' He was a stylish, refined man, with a wicked sense of humor. And a pleasure to work with or around. I met him at KCBS in San Francisco in the 1970's and we became fast friends. Then, he headed off to NYC as a CBS News Network anchor, where after what I think was a 15-year run he retired to Mexico, where he built a solar powered house and eventually landed at KNX doing business news, which is where I ended up, just a few weeks before the 9/11 Twin Tower attack." 

Riddle, Sam: KRLA, 1960-63; KFWB, 1963-65; KHJ, 1965-70; KDAY, 1971-72; KROQ, 1972-73; KHJ, 1974. The longtime producer of Star Search produces tv specials.
Riddlemosher, Rob: KCMG, 1998-99. Rob left his post as marketing director at KRBV-Dallas in February 2003.
Riedy, Matt: KTWV, 2006-10. Matt joined Smooth Jazz KTWV from doing mornings at the Seattle Smooth Jazz station. He left in the summer of 2010. Matt's also an actor and has recurring on Nickelodeon's Big Time Rush

RIEGLE, Barbara: KNX, 1967-69; KFWB, 1969-87. Barbara, one of the pioneering women in L.A. radio news, died March 19, 2007. She was 85.

As an intern in the KWIZ newsroom at the age of 17, I dreamed of the big time, and listened to KNX and KFWB reporters closely every day.  Over the next several years, I eventually met many of the reporters whose work I admired, but was frustrated that I had not met Barbara.

In my early 20s, while visiting my mom's house, I ran into the mailman, who recognized me from my night shift at KWIZ.  He asked if I knew Barbara Riegle, and I told him that I did not.  "Let me introduce you," he said.  We walked one block up Gain Street where I grew up, turned a corner onto Chain Street, and knocked on the door.  Barbara answered!  She had lived around the corner from where I grew up all those years, and I never knew.

Our visit was outstanding, and she was gracious enough to spend an hour or so with me in her living room talking about her Orange County beat and the state of LA Radio.  My story proves that not only is radio a small business, but that this is – indeed – a very small world. (Written by Patrick Veling)

Riggenbach, Jeff: KFWB, 1972-78 and 1986-87; KFAC, 1988-89. Jeff lives in San Francisco and works as a freelance writer and editor. He narrates audio books and teaches.
Riggio, Stephanie: KPCC, 1992-2000; KACD, 1999. Stephanie is a voiceover artist.
Riggs, Dylan: KYSR, 2013-14. MY/fm morning became on-air weekends at 98-7 in early summer of 2013.
Riley, Chuck: KZLA, 1979-80. Chuck had an active voiceover career including clients such as Ford and KABC/Channel 7. He died May 10, 2007. Chuck was 66.
Riley, Dick: KIKF, 1982-85. Until 2006, Dick was a voice talent at Dabrow radio in Costa Mesa.
Riley, Jonathan: KGFJ, 80s. Unknown.
Riley, Pat: KLAC, 1978-79. Pat is manager of the Miami Heat NBA basketball team.
Riley, Scott: KCMG, 1999-2001. Scott is part of the crew of Outrageous Game Show Moments for NBC.

     

(Tom Reopelle, Trip Reeb, Ronni Richards, Ramona Ripston, and Jim Rondeau )

Ripston, Ramona: KABC, 1990-91. Ramona ran one of the 53 affiliates and chapters that make up the ACLU's national organization.
Rittenhouse, Jim: KWOW, 1966-72; KLFM, 1967-70. Jim passed away April 26, 2003. "Even though he had been struggling with paralysis because of a stroke in 1996, and had battled diabetes most of his life, his death came suddenly, and was unexpected. He developed severe pneumonia which resulted in heart failure just hours after he was admitted into the hospital," wrote his son Doug.
Rivas, Chris: KPWR, 1995. Chris was part of the evening Ruffnex Show with Mr. Chocolate. He left radio and is working for a record company.
Rivard, Mike: KWIZ, 1968; KFOX; KDAY; KBIG; KFAC; KGBS; KGFJ/KUTE; KIIS, KFI, 1984-97; KABC, 1997-2001. Mike is ceo and founder at RadFlight.
Rivera, Freddy: KIIS, 2012-14. Freddy works fill-in and weekends at KIIS/fm, as well as KGGI in the Inland Empire. He started out as an intern for Rick Dees.
Rivera, Geraldo: KABC, 2012-13. Geraldo began a mid-morning talk show KABC on 1.30.12. He left in late 2013 and beginning in 2014, he hosts a local show at WABC-New York.

Rivers, Bob: KCBS/fm, 2001. Bob spent 11 days as the morning show at "Arrow 93." His KZOK-Seattle morning job came to an abrupt end in early October 2010. He went on to mornings at KJR/fm in Seattle. He plans to retire from radio in August 2014.
Rivers, Dan: KELT/KLIT, 2001. Dan worked morning drive at KELT/KLIT-Riverside.
Rivers, Mark: KODJ, 1989. Unknown.

RIVERS, Steve: KIIS, 1986-89. Steve (Carl Belcher) was the pd at KIIS/fm from 1986-89. He went on to serve in executive positions with CBS Radio, AM/FM/Chancellor Media/Evergreen Media, Pyramid Broadcasting and others. Rivers died of cardiac arrest on March 6, 2012. He was 58. Steve stepped away from radio in 2007 when he suffered the first of multiple strokes. In 2008, FMQB honored Rivers as its Top Radio Executive at its 40th Anniversary Event.

Steve started as a jock in 1972 at KCBQ-San Diego. He arrived at KIIS from KMEL-San Francisco and programmed the station until 1989. His major programming assignments started in 1974 at WZGC-Atlanta. He was a jock at WCJX (“96X”)-Miami where he met his mentor Jerry Clifton, followed by WRBQ-Tampa/St. Petersburg, KOPA-Phoenix, WAPE-Jacksonville and KNDE/KROY-Sacramento.

During Steve's watch at KIIS, some of his unusual programming innovations included the fm's zero-talk hours and the AM's Dance-Mix format. He also conceived the KIIS/fm "Star Cruiser," a $250,000 mobile broadcast studio. Steve left in 1989 for WZOU (now WJMN)-Boston where in addition to programming he could do outside consulting.

In 1990 he was named Billboard magazine Program Director of the Year. Steve's wife Maureen Matthews was pd of Transtar's Niche 29.

In 1991, Steve left WZOU and crossed town to rival WXKS (“Kiss108”), where he became vp of programming.

In late 1994, he was promoted to the newly created post of chief programming officer for parent Pyramid Communications and went on to be chief program officer of Chancellor Media, later AMFM, Inc. based in Seattle. In a two-part 1995 Q & A session in R&R, Steve was asked his strongest and weakest attributes and he responded, "Being persistent and not giving up on a win and probably spending too many hours at it."

In the same article he discussed his programming principles: "First you've got to play the hits. The hits form the center of the radio station. The music has to be familiar, strong and show some passion. We also have to remember what business we're in. We're in radio, but in reality, we're entertainers."

Rivers, Tom: KIQQ, 1975 and 1977. Tom died November 20, 2004, after a short battle with cancer. He was 57. Born Tom Loughridge, he worked at KIMN-Denver between his two stints at "K-100." When he left L.A. radio he joined KYA-San Francisco, followed by pd slot in Anchorage, and then to Toronto radio, including CHUM.
Rizo, Jose: KLON/KKJZ, 1990-2012. Jose hosts "Jazz on the Latin Side" at "K-Jazz."
Roadmap, Dr.: KABC, 1990-95. David Rizzo helped drivers during morning drive at KABC. 
Roast, Chuck: KROQ, 2000-03. Chuck is now program director in New York.
Robbin, Rich "Brother": KIQQ, 1973 and 1975; KKDJ, 1974-75; KGFJ, 1975; KTNQ, 1976-77. Rich hosts popular Top 40 Internet station, RichBroRadio.com. He also works afternoon drive at The Walrus in San Diego.
Robbyns, Linda: KACD, 1994. Unknown.
Roberts, Art: KFWB, 1961. Art died March 6, 2002. Best known for his work in Chicago at WLS and WCFL during the Top 40 heyday of the 70s, he was a member of the KFWB strike replacement team in 1961. He was 70.
Roberts, Brian: KDAY, 1976-80; KUTE, 1980-83; KMGG, 1984-86; KKHR, 1986; KZLA, 1987-90; KRTH, 1990-93; KCBS, 1993-94; KRLA, 1996; KZLA, 1996; KLTE, 1999-2002. Brian works for Bunnin Chevy in Culver City as the Fleet/Internet Manager.
Roberts, Chris: KUTE, 1973-79; KGGI, 1981-83; KFI/KOST, 1981-92; KMPC, 1992-94; XTRA, 1994. Beside a life in sports broadcasting, Chris owns income property and works as a broker for a firm in Glendale. He has been the play-by-play voice for UCLA football, basketball and baseball since 1992.

 

(Rodri Rodriguez, Roz, Bob Ray, and Doyle Rose)

Roberts, Craig: KIIS, 1991; KRTH, 1991; KYSR/KXEZ, 1992; KIIS, 1997. Craig has an active voiceover career.
Roberts, Dave: KEZY, 1975; KWIZ, 1975. Since 1985, Dave has owned a research and consultancy firm in Austin.
Roberts, Doug: SEE Doug the Slug
Roberts, Joel: KSRF/KOCM, 1988-90; KMPC, 1990-91; KFI, 1991-92; KABC, 1992-94. Joel operates a training and consultation company for Talk radio.

ROBERTS, Ken: KROQ, 1972-86; KSRF/KACD, 1991-97. Ken was the controversial owner of KROQ in the 70s and 80s. He passed away in May 2014 after a series of illnesses, at the age 72. He earned and lost multi-millions of dollars over the years.

Born in Hoboken, Ken had a deep history with KROQ. In the mid-1970s with the station heavily in debt, he attained his first partnership meeting. He owned the station for almost 15 years before he sold it to Infinity Broadcasting Corporation for $45 million.

According to a station profile in the LA Times in 1985, "KROQ's owners turned out to be a doctor, a pair of dairymen, a Sacramento lobbyist, a secretary and several other small investors who knew little or nothing about broadcasting. Roberts found himself president on the strength of his experience as a concert promoter - as close to actual radio experience as any of the KROQ partners had."

On July 29, 1974, KROQ went off the air for two years. In 1976, Ken began to rebuild slowly. There was no more commercial-free broadcasting or million-dollar promotional gimmickry. In the article Ken said: "Rick Carroll [pd] liked to tell everybody he was the one who turned it around."

Ken said he was responsible for making KROQ the first mainstream station in Los Angeles to regularly play Prince, an artist who had been consistently heard only on Los Angeles' four black stations until the early '80s. By 1982, Ken had controlling interest in the company that owned KROQ. (Photo: Ken Roberts and Freddy Snakeskin)

By the end of the stock market crash in 1987, Roberts was completely broke again, according to Roger Friedman at Showbiz411.com. “He went on to make and lose a lot more money. He bought the most expensive piece of real estate in Southern California and lost that too. For a long time, he managed Frankie Valli, and he was there on opening night of Jersey Boys on Broadway. He also worked with Sly Stone, trying to rescue him from greedy managers. Lawsuits are still raging. He has discovered the fund wasn’t intending to just make him a loan, it really wanted to get control of his high-value property.”

 In 1991 he bought KSRF and KOCM for $17.8 million. The two stations (for a time were branded as MARS/fm) occupied the same dial position - 103.1- the former based in Santa Monica and the latter in Newport Beach.

Friedman talked about the early days of KROQ: “To alt-rock fans, Roberts may be considered an unsung hero. When the owners of KROQ ran into money trouble in the mid-1970s and took the station dark, the FCC gave them ten days to get the station back on the air or forfeit the license. Roberts, who was among those they owed money for a station concert, bought some radio equipment, paid the electric bill and got KROQ on the air from its transmitter. Eventually a trade with the Pasadena Hilton enabled the station to move into the hotel.  Helped by an explosion of alternative and punk music over the next decade, KROQ took off and became one of the best-known Modern Rock stations in the country.”

“Ken Roberts was a dreamer, a tummler, a larger than life guy who made show biz glow with mystery. I’m really glad I knew him,” concluded Friedman.

Roberts, Mike: KYSR, 2005-06. Mike, also known as Stench, hosts a podcast with his former STAR partner, Jack Heine. He's also executive producer of The Jason Ellis Show on Sirius XM 52. Mike works at Benztown.
Roberts, Nathan: KDAY, 1969-74; KIIS; KDAY. Nathan went on to doing news at Channel 9. In 1987 he moved to Washington DC and is currently with Newschannel 8.
Roberts, Rick "Jo Jo": KJLH, 1984. Unknown.
Roberts, Stephanie: KNX, 1995-2007. Stephanie and her husband own Party Pronto, a company that supplies party supplies.
Roberts, Tom E.: KYMS, 1972-74. At the end of his life, Tom was breeding horses in Central California. He died in 1995, at the age of 48.
Roberts, Dr. William: KREL, 1973-74. The ordained minister owned KQLH-San Bernardino until 1989 when he sold it and the station became KFRG.
Robertson, Ron: KRLA, 1971-73. Unknown.
Robins, Jeff: SEE Bruce Chandler

 

(Leslie Rojas, Nick Ryan, and Stephanie Riggio)

Robinson, Curtis: KACE, 1994; KJLH, 1995-97; KKLA; 2007-10. Curtis is a board-op/producer at Christian KKLA.

ROBINSON, Dave: KBIG, 1971-86. Dave died August 20, 2008. He was 78 years old. 

Born on July 29, 1930 and raised in Baltimore, Dave joined the Air Force in 1947. As a radio operator, he flew “photo-mapping” missions in B-17's and B-29’s. One day, during a preflight test of the plane's radios, Dave called the tower and an on-board engineer remarked about his having a nice voice and told him he should work on the base radio station. Following a stint with Armed Forces Radio in Puerto Rico, Dave was discharged in 1951 and began his radio career at WASA-Havre de Grace, Maryland. For the next 15 years Dave worked at radio and tv stations in the Baltimore/ West Virginia corridor. “In the mid-1950s I worked at WFBR-Baltimore, the station where Arthur Godfrey got his start,” Dave told me while researching Los Angeles Radio People. In 1965 he joined Bonneville’s KMBZ in Kansas City; transferring to KBIG in 1971. Fifteen years later, after the KBIG gig ended, Dave became the admissions director at L.A.B. “For a shy kid who spent most of his life alone in a radio studio, I found I liked interacting with ‘real’ people,” he remembered. When the school folded, Dave took a similar position with National Broadcasting School in Sacramento until 1992, when he retired. “These are the golden years, and with my social security check and AFTRA retirement, I’m having a great time. I like to laugh a lot.” 

Finally, after a couple of years studying at American River College, Dave graduated as a Gerontologist, the study of aging. “I’ve discovered that the imagination one uses in relating to an unseen audience is very helpful in dealing with elders, who are often confused when facing old age.” Dave also worked with Senior Peer Counseling as a Media and Outreach Specialist, and was a member of Valley Legends, a social group of retired broadcasters. 

Robinson, Dick: KMPC, 1970. Unknown.
Robinson, Mark: KMGG, 1983-85; KIKF, 1991-99. Mark worked all-night at Country KIKF.
Robinson, Marsha: KACE, 1980-89; KGFJ, 1989-95. Marsha is head of promotions at WCIN-Cincinnati.
Robinson, Pamela: KACE, 1979-80; KJLH, 1984-85; KACE, 1985-86; KACD, 1995. Pamela works at "Shadow and Light' video production company.
Robinson, Smokey: KCMG/KHHT, 2000-02. Former leader and Hall of Famer Smokey Robinson joined "Mega 92.3" for evenings on July 24, 2000 and left in the fall of 2002.

(Ron Rodrigues, Smokey Robinson, Brian Roberts, and Jeff Rollins)

Rocchio, Mark: KLON, 1982-84; KGUY, 1985; KFWB, 1985-94. Mark is a writer/producer in the news department at KNBC/Channel 4.
Rocha, Nestor: KSEE, KACD/KBCD, 1999-2001. Nestor was elevated from md to pd of the Spanish stations in late 2000. He's now vp/programming for Entravision
Rochon: Lonnie: KDAY. Unknown.
Rocinna, Joe: KAGB, 1975. Unknown.
Rockoff, Neil: KNX/fm, 1972; KGBS/KTNQ, 1976-79; KHJ, 1979-82. Neil is special projects manager at Jones Satellite Network.

RODDY, Rod: KGBS, 1967; KDAY, 1967; KOST, 1972-74. Robert Ray Roddy died October 27, 2003, of colon, prostate, and breast cancer. He was 66. He had been ill for two years. "The courage he showed during those difficult times was an inspiration to us all," said Bob Barker, host of The Price Is Right. Barker recounted a recent visit to his friend: "I went to the hospital and sat on the edge of his bed and we laughed the whole time we were talking. He was still having fun."

Beginning in 1985, Rod was the booming, jovial voice on The Price Is Right that invited contestants to "Come on down!"

He was born September 18, 1937, in Ft. Worth and attended T.C.U. majoring in radio and tv. Rod was a wedding photographer while in high school and college and appeared as a regular on a local tv show, Teen Times with Pat Boone. He started as a dj in 1953 at KXOL-Ft. Worth. "During my lengthy broadcasting career I was pd for both true pioneers of format radio, Todd Storz and Gordon McLendon."

His radio journey took him to WQAM-Miami, WABR-Orlando, KXLR-Little Rock, WTIX-New Orleans, KOMA-Oklahoma City, KQV-Pittsburgh, KYW-Cleveland, WJJD-Chicago WQXI-Atlanta, and WKBW-Buffalo. In 1968 he returned to Dallas as morning man on KLIF and hosted a controversial talk show with McLendon. "Our show was the inspiration for Oliver Stone's Talk Radio."

Rod returned to Southern California in 1972 to program KOST and he hosted a syndicated show "On A Clear Day" featuring guests from the world of the occult. In 1974 he initiated his new career in voiceover work. He was the voice of ABC's Soap which ran for four years. Rod was the announcer on a number of game shows including Whew, Battle Stars, So You Think You've Got Troubles, Hit Man and Press Your Luck. He was the announcer on Love Connection for the first four years before joining Bob Barker on The Price Is Right.

He hosted The $25,000 Game Show for two seasons at the Roy Clark Theater in Branson, Missouri. Internationally, Rod was the official ambassador of Chaing Mai, Thailand and traveled frequently to Southeast Asia to create his colorful Thai silk wardrobe  featured on The Price Is Right.

Rodgers, Travis: KLAA, 2012-14. Travis works morning drive at the Angels' station. For 15 years, Travis produced the Jim Rome show. He also hosts a national sports show weekdays on Yahoo Sports Radio.
Rodrigues
, Paul: KKBT, 1989. The former morning man at "the Beat" is a versatile tv and film actor. He is seen frequently on the improv circuit.
Rodrigues, Ron: KMPC, 1979-82; KMGG, 1985. Ron was Marketing Communications Director at Arbitron until the company was purchased by Nielsen ratings company in late 2013.
Rodriguez, Charlie: KMAX, 1990; KFOX, 1993-94; KALI, 1997-2001. Charlie works at KALI.
Rodriguez, Joe: KKBT, 1995-97. Unknown.
Rodriguez, Nancy: KLVE, 1998-2005; KCAQ, 2005-14. Nancy joined the morning show at KCAQ-Oxnard/Ventura in the spring of 2005. Beginning in 2010, Nancy was at Total Traffic Network (Clear Channel Communications). In 2012, she became the news/traffic reporter for KHAY, KBBY and KVYB (Radiate Media/ Cumulus Media), in Oxnard/Ventura.
Rodriguez, Rodri: KFI, 1996-98. Rodri runs a marketing and promotion business and coordinates Mariachi festivals every year at the Hollywood Bowl.


(Bill Richards, Travis Rodgers, Phil Reed, and Steve Ray)

Roebuck, Jay: KLON, 1985-93. Jay was the pd and on-air personality of the Long Beach Jazz station. He died of a heart attack on March 17, 1993, at the age of 55.
Rogers, Beach: KIEV, 1956-64; KFWB, 1964-71; KNX, 1971-98. Beach retired from KNXNewsradio in 1998. He's a docent at the LA County Zoo.
Rogers, Dave: KLAC, 1967. Unknown.
Rogers, Joe: KPPC, 1970-71; KMET, 1971-72. "Mississippi Fats" worked at WBCN-Boston before arriving in the Southland where he used the name Mississippi Brian Wilson. Joe is now a restaurant broker in Boston.
Rogers, Julia: KABC, 2001-03. Julia lives in South Carolina.
Roggin, Fred: KMPC, 2002-06; KLAC, 2006. Fred started an afternoon show at all-Sports KMPC in early 2002 and left in early summer of 2006. He joined T.J. Simers and his daughter Tracy for a morning show at KLAC on October 30, 2006, which ended September 27, 2007. In early 2014, Fred was inducted into the Southern California Sports Broadcasters Hall of Fame.

ROHDE, Barry: KNX, 1965-97. In the 1980s Barry was the afternoon anchor and moved to middays in the '90s on "KNXNewsradio."

Born in Rahway, New Jersey he started his radio career in Kansas and Indiana. He was the co-director of the Indiana Presidential Primary and General Election unit for the CBS Radio Network. Barry won the "Outstanding Young Man of the Year" award, and in 1965 joined KNX where he worked as feature reporter, traffic, weather and sports editor. He was part of the team that won 22 Golden Mike Awards for Best News.

Barry Rohde originally trained to become a Baptist minister – a background which some have suggested influenced his on-air personality. He has been cited as sounding “a bit like the voice of God at times, unshakeable in the face of disasters besetting mere mortals.”

During his time at Ottawa University, Barry was profoundly affected by the mentoring of Dean David (D.W.) Bemmels and his experience with KTJO, the student-operated campus radio station. After graduating in 1960, he became a news and sports announcer on WIOU radio in Kokomo, Indiana.

 

In 1964, a CBS radio executive heard the young reporter on the air. He passed a tip to the CBS owned radio station, KNX, and Rohde was promptly signed to a contract. The 27-year-old started his first major-market gig as the announcer for the KNX morning show hosted by future Hogan’s Heroes star Bob Crane.

 

During the 1965 Watts riots, Rohde won his stripes as a field reporter for the station, which was slowing evolving into an all-News entity. After a stint as a reporter, Rohde found his dream job as sports editor. He served in the sports department for six years until his news talents were once again unexpectedly called into action during the MGM fire in Las Vegas. He – along with the morning anchor – ad-libbed his way through what turned out to be a grueling eight-hour live broadcast.

 

Rohde was promptly moved into the featured afternoon drive time anchor position, where he remained for many years. During that time, his awards mounted.  He always relished breaking news, saying: “It’s a challenge breaking stories. I was on the air when two planes collided at LAX. We began by winging it until we got more information and the reporters arrived on the scene. What a news anchor really is, is a traffic cop – you’ve got to make everything fit.”

 

Toward the end of his fabled career, Barry Rohde decided to give back to Ottawa University in a big way. After 33 years as an anchor in the country’s second largest market, Barry decided to move on to retirement. At the time of his retirement his news director said: “He’s without peer in handling surprises in a calm way. When you have an earthquake, you want a Barry Rohde at the mike. He can handle the curves – and in this business you get a lot of surprises. He always makes you look good.”

 

Barry and his wife Alma, a former model and dance instructor, retired to Florida in the summer of 1997. (bio provided by Ottawa University)  

Rojas, Leslie: KPCC, 2010. Leslie is a reporter on immigration issues.
Rolfe, Cary: KZLA, 1994-96. Cary is program director at KUPL-Portland.
Roll, Robert: KROQ, 1981-85; KMET, 1985; KMPC/fm, 1989. Robert now works in environmental documentaries as a writer-producer. He still does narrations for marketing videos, EPK's and network "sizzle reels."
Rollins, Jeff: KLAC, 1997-98; KGIL, 1998-2000. Jeff works mornings at Dial Global's Adult Standards format.
Roman, Alex: KLYY, 1999-2003. Alex is chief engineer at WKTU-New York.
Roman, Nick: KLON/KKJZ, 1984-2004; KPCC, 2004-10. Nick left the all-Jazz station in March 2004 following the elimination of the news department. Nick had been news director for almost 13 years.
Roman, Tedd: KLDE, 2007-08. SEE Ted Schermerhorn

ROMAY, Lina: KNX. Lina, who sang with Xavier Cugat orchestra in the early 1940s before beginning a decade-long career as a film, radio and tv actress, died December 17 of natural causes. She was 91.

For a decade during the 1980s, Lina was the race track call girl for Hollywood Park. She  translated racing information into Spanish for many Southland stations and made the calls for KNX. Born in New York City, a “true Latin from Manhattan,” she was only 18 years old when she debuted as the vocalist for Xavier Cugat over a coast to coast radio broadcast that originated from the fabled Waldorf Astoria Hotel. MGM announced plans to do a remake of their Academy Award winning Grand Hotel and combine it with a musical version of a recently published novel titled Weekend at The Waldorf. Lina’s performance was rewarded with a studio contract. “My contract guaranteed that I wouldn’t be limited to just musical roles and for at least 10 years appeared in movies with Clark Gable, Mickey Rooney, Van Johnson, Ava Gardner, Fred Astaire and many other MGM luminaries.” Lina also appeared for 39 consecutive weeks on Bing Crosby’s Kraft Music Hall radio program. She guest starred in I Love Lucy and several tv shows with Bob Hope and Red Skeleton. 

Rome, Jim: XTRA/KXTA, 1990-2008; KLAC, 2009-12. Jim's syndicated KLAC show ended in late 2012 when he moved from Premiere to CBS Sports Radio. Double XX 1090 is the closest station to Los Angeles.
Romero, Bobby: SEE Sky Walker
Romero, Danny: KCMG, 1998-99. Danny is the weekend weatherman at KABC/Channel 7.
Rondeau, Jim: KOST, 1993-94; KCBS, 1994-97; KYSR, 1997-98; KBIG, 1999. Jim is director of operations and programming at KCLU-Thousand Oaks.

 

(Stephanie Roberts, Chuck Rowe, Red Rooster, Dyland Riggs, and Al Racco)

Ronni: KIIS. Unknown.

ROOK, John: KFI, 1977-82, pd; KABC, 1988-89, pd. The very successful radio programming consultant during the 1970s and '80s was born October 9, 1937, in Chillicothe, Ohio, and raised in Chadron, Nebraska. After high school he came to the Southland in the mid-1950s and studied acting at the Pasadena Playhouse with Sal Mineo and Natalie Wood. Following bit parts in several motion pictures, his best friend, Rock 'n Roll Hall of Fame legend Eddie Cochran, suggested John consider a career in radio.

His first dj job in 1957 was at KASL-New Castle, Wyoming, followed by KOBH-Hot Springs, South Dakota, KALL-Salt Lake City and KTLN-Denver. By 1964, he was pd of KQV-Pittsburgh and from 1967 to 1971 he was pd of WLS-Chicago. In 1969, his peers named WLS "Station of the Year" and John Rook "Radio's Man of the Year."

In the early 1970s, John teamed up with Chuck Blore and Ken Draper in a consultancy company. He started John Rook & Associates in 1974 with WCFL-Chicago as one of his first clients. Within weeks, the legendary Larry Lujack left WLS for WCFL saying, "I think John Rook is the greatest pd of our time or any other time. He's a real pro, super fair and up front and honest."

As a consultant, John's impressive client list soon included WABC-New York, WIFI-Philadelphia, WHYI-Miami, WZGC-Atlanta, WBAP-Dallas/Ft. Worth, KIMN-Denver, KRBE-Houston and WGCL-Cleveland. In 1977 John was named "Consultant of the Year" and at the suggestion of Chuck Blore was named pd of KFI. Cox VP James Wesley and operations head Elliott "Biggie" Nevins backed John as he rocked KFI's 50,000 watts and took on RKO's KHJ.

Within a year, KHJ went to a Country format, the end of an era. In 1983, John purchased KCDA-Spokane and started dividing his time between his Northridge residence and his horse ranch south of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. In 1987, the Reagan White House named him a commissioner candidate at the FCC. Again in 1988 Chuck Blore persuaded KABC gm George Green to hire John to return to Los Angeles as pd of KABC for a year. In 1994, R&R readers voted John, "One of the most influential programmers of the past twenty years."

Today, John lives on his Idaho ranch complete with satellite TV and the Internet where he stays in touch with LA radio and tv daily. He sold his radio stations in 1998. 

Rooney, Jeff: KABC, 2003-10. Jeff works for one of the news/traffic services.
Roope, Jim: KWST, 1980; KFOX, KIEV; KRLA; KFI; KNNS, 1995-96; KGIL, 1997-99; KNX, 1999-2000; KABC, 2014. Jim worked for CNN Radio for many years. He's now with KABC news.
Rose, Darren: KYSR, 2007-13. Starting out as a programming coordinator at STAR 98.7, Darren joined the on-air staff for evenings in late 2007. He was promoted to 98-7fm apd in early fall of 2009. He left the station in the summer of 2013. He now hosts DarrenRose.com, a website offering unique interviews.
Rose, Dianna: KSRF, 1989-91; "K-LITE," 1991-92; KACD, 1992-95. Dianna is md/morning drive personality at KWJZ ("Smooth Jazz")-Seattle. 
Rose, Doyle: KPWR, 1991-96. Doyle is a consultant with Emmis Broadcasting.

(Sharon Reardon, Darren Rose, and Liza Richardson)

Rose, Hilly: KABC, 1970-72; KFI, 1972-79; KMPC, 1979-82; KABC, 1982-84. Hilly is doing a show on the Sirius Satellite Radio Sci-Fi Channel.
Rose, "Big J": KODJ, 1989-90. Francis is the Communications Director for the Progress and Freedom Foundation in Washington, DC.
Rose, Jim: KZLA, 1985-93. Jim owns a digital on-hold company in Grants Pass, Oregon. He is the program director at KCNA in Medford, Oregon. Jim is set for induction into the South Dakota Musicians' Rock 'n Roll hall of Fame. He was on the road as a backup band to J. Frank Wilson. Jim co-wrote the tribute song, Seven Years to Glory, for the Portland Trailblazers in 1976 when they became champions.

ROSE, Judd: KFWB, 1978-79. Judd, the Emmy award-winning co-anchor of CNN NewsStand, Entertainment Weekly, and former KFWB newsman died June 10, 2000 in New York at age 45. He had been undergoing treatment for a brain tumor.

Judd is the son of former Los Angeles Talk show veteran, Hilly Rose. Judd left KFWB in the late 1970s and worked at numerous network operations. "I worked with him when I was an editor at KFWB and enjoyed him," said Rich Buhler. "Judd was very bright." Judd joined CNN in 1998 from ABC News, where he was a correspondent for PrimeTime Live for nine years and contributed a wide range of stories, from political investigations and reports on corruption to newsmaker interviews and celebrity profiles. He contributed reports to Good Morning America, World News Tonight, and Turning Point. Rose investigated charges of sexual harassment in the Los Angeles Police Department, the police beating of Rodney King in Los Angeles and contributed to the award-winning PrimeTime Live investigation of the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland.

"Judd Rose was one of the best radio reporters ever - with a nose for the unusual angle and the unusual interviewee," emailed Dan Avey, KFWB morning co-anchor. "This was highlighted by some of the funniest ‘features’ ever done on network tv, during the 1984 Olympics. Judd was intelligent, unassuming, unflappable and a great friend. He will be missed." During the Gulf War, Judd reported from Saudi Arabia on media restrictions imposed by the military and on the specialized search-and-rescue teams who flew dangerous missions into hostile Iraq. Over the past year he delved into the entertainment business, going behind the scenes in Hollywood to report on a variety of topics related to film, television and music. Recent reports have included a look at the film studio "junket" system, damage control publicity for stars in crisis and profiles of Sir Ian McKellen, Francis Ford Coppola and Frank Sinatra, among others. Earlier in his career Judd reported for KABC/Channel 7 and KNBC/Channel 4 and Associated Press Radio in New York and Washington, D.C. He was also a writer for NBC Radio, New York, and The Associated Press broadcast wire. Judd won four Emmys, including one in 1987 for his contributions to Nightline's coverage of the fall of Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos and most recently for his coverage of the funeral of Princess Diana. He also received an Associated Press Broadcast Award for his coverage of the murder of San Francisco Mayor George Moscone.

Rose, Roger: KMGG, 1983; KFI, 1986. Roger was an original VH-1 vj and is an actor.
Rosefsky, Bob: KABC, 1979-88; KBLA, 1988-89. Bob is editor-in-chief of CruiseNet, a bi-monthly travel magazine. Since 1991, Bob has been living in Palm Springs.
Rosen, Sharone: XPRS, KWNK; KLAC; KCSN, 2008-09; KFWB, 2008-12. Sharone worked morning drive at KCSN until the Classical station automated in late September 2009. She continues to provide traffic reports at KFWB.
Rosenberg, Hal: KRTH, 1972-74. Hal was running KFSD-San Diego until his retirement in 1996.
Rosenberg, Leo: KMET, 1972. After radio, Leo became a teacher in Long Beach.
Rosenbloom, Randy: KWNK, 1984-85; KMPC, 2000. Randy is with the Digital Sports and Entertainment Network. 

 

(Al Rantel, Carol Ramos, Joey Reynolds, Wayne Resnick, and Dave Randall)

Rosenbloom, Slapsie-Maxie: KLAC. Slapsie-Maxie was a Las Vegas comedian, actor and former professional boxer and was part of KLAC's attempt to resurrect the "Big 5" djs.
Rosenthal, Jessica: KFI, 2003-07. Jessica was a weekday reporter and weekend anchor at KFI. She's now with Fox News Radio.

ROSKO: KGFJ, 1964-65; KBLA, 1965; KMET, 1971. Bill Mercer, better known as "Rosko," died August 1, 2000 after a long, hard fight with cancer. He was 72.

Rosko worked at KGFL and KBLA in the mid-1960s and went to New York and began the "underground" revolution on WNEW/fm on October 30, 1967. Some saw a streak of arrogance in Rosko, others, particularly younger colleagues, saw a free spirit, a wise and spiritual man. A colleague from WKTU-New York remembered: "He was philosophical and poetic about his illness, life, love, politics, radio and advertising. He always spoke romantically of Jo, his wife." Another colleague said: "He had that great voice, like an Orson Welles. And he'd talk with a guy like me, give me advice. I'll miss him. He knew he was one of the best, and he demanded that excellence from everyone." Rosko took himself out of commercial radio in 1985 when he quit WKTU on the air by accusing management — including Mel Karmazin, who is now head of CBS — of racial bias. He kept busy with voiceover work after that, notably for CBS Sports. He missed radio, he said in 1990, "but only 5% of hosts today understand their potential. And stations wouldn't let them fulfill it."

 

(Aundrae Russell, Curtis Robinson, Mark Rocchio, and Meghan Reyes)

ROSS, Alan: Alan works for Total Traffic Network/Los Angeles as a news anchor for KRLA/870am weekend overnights and does news voicers for KDB/fm in Santa Barbara, and a Victorville cluster. Currently he also does media planning, buying and advertising projects for clients in the Southland. 

In the past he has done fill-in on KFWB, KFI, and [the old] KIEV. He aslo did time as anchor/reporter for Money Radio Network and Financial Broadcasting Network and was a per diem newswriter at KTTV/Channel 11 and KCOP/Channel 13. He spent 13 years in the Central California Coast doing radio for KVEC-San Luis Obispo and KCIN-Santa Maria, and tv news anchoring and reporting for KSBY-San Luis Obispo and KCOY-Santa Maria.   

Ross, Brenda: KPWR, 1987-92. Brenda worked morning drive at KBLX-San Francisco until the summer of 2002.
Ross, Don: KNX, 1952-57. Don was the longtime owner of Premier Sports, a sports marketing company managing golf tournaments, such as "The Quarterbacks Tournament" and travel incentive packages for major sporting events. Don passed in 2012, at the age of 88. In 2008, Don moved to Northern California from the Southland to be closer to his family and grandkids. Don's final years were spent playing golf, reminiscing about his Los Angeles media career, his many friends and colleagues such as Don Drysdale, Les Richter, Dan Reeves, Jerry West and the incomparable Dick Whittinghill, while trout and steelhead fishing on the banks of the American, Sacramento & Cosumnes Rivers. 
Ross, Don: KHJ; KNX, 1966. Don left Southland radio for KFMB-San Diego and was a tv booth announcer for decades. He retired in San Diego and worked on his art work. Don has passed away in 2011.
Ross, Eva: KHJ, 1974 and 1976-77; KIKF, 1980-90. Eva anchored the news at KHJ from 1974 to 1977. She writes for the OC Register and is married to Lyle Kilgore.
Ross, Frankie: KJLH, 1986-90; KKBT, 1990-92; KJLH, 1992-2003. Last heard, Frankie was working in the Antelope Valley.
Ross, Kevin: KGFJ, 1993; KKBT, 1993-94; KACE, 1998-99. Kevin left radio for good in 1999. He publishes All Radio News.com and sells real estate in LA.
Ross, Kevin: KTZN 1997; KABC, 1997-98. Kevin was a judge of the Inglewood Municipal Court District. He now hosts the syndicated America's Court.
Ross, Lee: KFOX, 1962-63. Lee wrote My Shoes Keep Walking Back to You and Heart-to-Heart Talk.
Ross, Maggie: KIQQ, 1977-80; KMPC, 1980; KHTZ, 1980-82; KLAC, 1982-87; KZLA, 1989-94; KCBS, 1994-2001. Maggie left "Arrow 93" in early 2001.
Ross, Neil: KPOL/fm, 1978; KZLA, 1979-80; KHTZ, 1981; KNX/fm, 1981; KMPC, 1982-85. Neil lives in L.A. and has an active voiceover career.
Ross, Nicci: KOCM/KSRF, 1989-90; KACD, 1994-96; KIBB, 1996-97. Nicci left L.A. in 1997 for WZGC ("Classic Roc Z93") in Atlanta. Since 1999, she has been working afternoons at WRAL ("Mix 101.5") in Raleigh, North Carolina. She worked as Teena Marcos at "B-100."

(Nancy Rodriguez, Michelle Roth, John Regan, and Lori Ryan)

Ross, Phil: KYMS, 1986-94. Phil co-hosts a nationally syndicated, weekly half-hour radio program called Ambassador Express Talk.
Rossi, Craig: KBIG/KOST, 2003-05; KYSR, 2005-07; KABC/KLOS, 2008-09. Craig was a regional vp for Citadel Broadcasting and DOS at KABC/KLOS.
Roth, Jack: KRLA, 1976-83. Jack is working voiceovers.
Roth, Michelle: KDAY, 1979-80; KRLA, 1983-85; KBIG, 1992; KMLT, 2002-07; KRTH 2007-14. Michelle is a therapist in West Los Angeles and hosted an evening relationship show at "Lite 92.7fm" until a format flip in late spring 2005. She also fills in at "K-Earth."

ROUNDS, Tom: Tom Rounds, best known as one of the founders of the quintessential syndicated program, American Top 40, died June 1, 2014, of complications from a minor surgical procedure. His wife and business partner of 49 years, Barbara Rounds, was at his bedside when he passed away. Tom was 77.

American Top 40 featured the team of Casey Kasem and producer Don Bustany. The program was popular in large markets and also allowed small market stations to present a three-hour national music chart countdown show at nominal cost that nevertheless produced good ratings and helped generate advertising revenue.

 

Rounds’ first radio show was at the campus radio station of Amherst College in Massachusetts in the late 1950s, where he earned degrees in English and Music. He worked at WINS (AM) in New York City as a newsman in 1959. While a dj at KPOI in Hawaii, Tom set the world record for sleeplessness. The period of 260 hours awake was attained while Rounds was sitting in a department store window display. Before he left KPOI, he became program director.

While at KFRC in San Francisco, Rounds began promoting large multi-act concerts to benefit charity and gain publicity for the station and the bands it featured. After holding the Beach Boys Summer Spectacular at the Cow Palace in 1966, Rounds and KFRC conceived of a large outdoor festival featuring a fair atmosphere similar to the popular Renaissance Pleasure Faire. The KFRC Fantasy Fair and Magic Mountain Music Festival were held in the second weekend of June 1967 at Mount Tamalpais State Park in Marin County, California, to support the Hunters Point Child Care Center. Featuring Jefferson Airplane, the 5th Dimension, The Doors and many other acts, the event drew nearly 60,000 attendees. The Fantasy Fair produced by Rounds is considered the first rock festival in history, preceding the more well-known Monterey Pop Festival by one week.

After Watermark was absorbed into the American Broadcasting Company in the early 1980s and became ABC Watermark, Rounds became responsible for the promotion and syndication of American Top 40 and other programs outside the United States. His independent company Radio Express was created in 1985 and produced and syndicated World Chart shows hosted by Lara Scott and PJ Butta, among other programming.

Rourke, Jack: KABC, 1957-58. Jack published a celebrity newspaper in the San Fernando Valley. He did October 14, 2004, at the age of 86.

ROWE, Bob: KMPC, 1966-94; KMAX, 1995. For three decades, beginning in the mid-1960s at KMPC, Bob was part of the sports scene at 710/KMPC. He died on September 23 in Littleton, New Hampshire, after a 17-month battle with cancer. He was 70. “My husband was courageous throughout,” said Nancy.

The native Angeleno, dubbed “Dr. Angel Fever” by Robert W. Morgan, Bob started with KMPC in 1966 working the “Sportswire.” When fans called “Webster 8-3000,” they got sports scores from around the country.

Two years later Bob became the sports producer, coordinating broadcasts of the Angels, Rams and UCLA Bruins. “I was anxious to get on the air and the opportunity came in 1972,” Bob told me when I interviewed him for Los Angeles Radio People.

 Bob did fill-in news and sports. “In 1979 my career really flourished when I was given the talk show following the Angel games. I did that right up until 1994 when the station was sold to CapCities. Despite my 28 years at the station, the new owners never gave me the courtesy of an interview before they bought the station. But I was hired a month after the sale to continue my “AngelTalk” shows and teamed with my old boss, Steve Bailey, to do a memorial tribute to Jim Healy who died in July 1994.”

The project won a Golden Mike award for best documentary. “I was not re-hired for the 1995 baseball season. Nobody ever explained why.”

Bob was born on October 5, 1942, in Los Angeles. He played baseball at Poly High School in Sun Valley, and graduated from Don Martin Radio School in 1961. He worked as a disc jockey at KACY-Oxnard and KUTY-Palmdale, before entering the U.S. Army in 1964. Bob served his country from 1964 to 1966. He was stationed in Schwezingen, Germany (“at least it wasn’t Vietnam”), where he served as a mapmaker.

Rowe, Chuck: KNX, 1996-2006. Chuck was a traffic anchor for KNX's “Southern California’s Morning News” and “Money 101” in morning drive. He's now program/news director for Froggy 106.7 (WFGA) in Auburn, Indiana. 
Rowe, Red: KFI, 1968-69. Red has retired to Palm Springs.
Roy, Eric: KNX, 2007-08. Eric was a traffic reporter for KNXNews Radio.
Roy, Mike: KNX, 1965-76. Mike Roy's Kitchen was a tv and radio fixture for years. Mike died June 26, 1976, at the age of 63. His longtime announcer, Dennis Bracken said: "Mourn Mike, but not his memory."
Roz: KLSX, 1988-90. Roz Byrne lives in Chicago and does weekends at the NINE/fm.
Rubin, Sam: KNX, 1994-2005; KMPC/KTZN, 1995-97; KLSX, 1999-2003. Sam is the entertainment reporter for KTLA/Channel 5 Morning News and airs entertainment reports on a number of L.A. stations.

 

(Bill Rice, Sam Rubin, Ted Randal, Matt Riedy, and Beau Richards)

Ruddle, Jim: XTRA, 1959-60. After leaving XTRA, Jim worked in Chicago tv for many years. He retired in 1986 and went sailing with layovers in St. Petersburg and Washington, D.C.  'Sailor' Jim finally settled in Rye, NY (portrayed in J.D. Salinger's book) in the early 90's and sails when the weather is good.
Rudman, Richard: KFWB, 1975-2002. The former director of engineering owns and operates his own firm, Remote Possibilities, that consults on emergency public information.
Rudnik, Lee: KMET, 1971. Lee was the midday jock at "the Mighty Met." He was a radio-tv major at New York University.
Ruiz, Cesar: KMJR, 2000-01. Cesar works middays at Spanish KMJR.

RUSH, Andy: KNX/fm, 1987-88; KMPC/fm, 1988; KSWD, 2013-14. Andy died of a heart attack, apparently related to a pulmonary embolism, on May 17, 2014. He was 60.

“Andy worked at KROI and later KROY from 1977 to 78 as the midday and later AM drive host and again from 1980 to 82 with a stop in between as the morning man at KZAP in 1979,” said colleague Bryan Simmons. “He later worked at KFOG and KRQR-San Francisco, returning to his hometown of Los Angeles to work in Los Angeles. I just cannot believe he’s gone.”

Tammy Trujillo dated Andy for a time in the late 80s when they taught at LAB (Los Angeles Broadcasters). “He was a wonderful, quirky, talented guy and the quintessential jock of the 70s and 80s,” emailed Tammy. “It has been so wonderful to watch the comments come in on Facebook and to realize how many people, especially up in the Bay area, remember and appreciate listening to The Rush! I will be playing some of his air checks for my students at Mt. SAC (Mount San Antonio College) this week so they can learn from another of the real pros who knew how to rock.”

Dave Beasing, program director at The Sound, described Andy as, “A great person. He really loved his profession and the people he met along the way. He was always the brunt of his own jokes, which were hilarious, kept everyone laughing.” Andy was working in production at The Sound at the time of his death.

“When I was 12 I wanted to go into acting,” said Andy when interviewed for Los Angeles Radio People. “When I found out that somewhere along the line I’d have to wear tights and do Shakespeare in a public park, acting became just a fond fantasy.”

Two years later Andy discovered his passion for radio. “I came across an ‘instant recording’ exhibit at the Science and Industry Museum in Exposition Park. I spoke into a condenser microphone when the green light went on and stopped as the red one came on. Within 10 seconds, it played back for you. A visitor to the Exposition suggested that I should get into radio broadcasting. That’s all it took.”

Andy started at KOTE-Lancaster followed by KREO-Indio. He secured an FCC First Class License and in 1975 joined KUBA/KHEX-Yuba City for $400 a month. Following a return to Lancaster, Andy was hired by KROI-Sacramento. “And I didn’t have to work Bakersfield or Stockton to get to the 23rd market.”

 “After leaving KMPC/fm, I got hired at L.A.B. (Los Angeles Broadcasters) as a teacher. I spent two years there, earning half as much as I could being on the air, but getting more satisfaction from it.”

In 1994 Andy was hired to be the “Navigation Voice” for Amerigon.

In addition to his radio work, Andy owned rental property in West Los Angeles, Hollywood and Oregon and bred Dachshund pups. A longtime friend, Barbara Bassett, said: Bassett said: “Andy was planning on chucking it all and moving to the orange groves of Ventura, where he could shout neighbors off his lawn."

Russell, Antoinette: KJLH, 1987-89; KACE, 1989-97; KOST, 1997-2001. Antoinette left KOST in the early fall of 2001.
Russell, Aundrae: KJLH, 1988-2014. Aundrae was made pd at KJLH in the summer of 2002.
Russell, Bill: KABC, 1970-73 and 1982. The former Celtic led Boston to 11 championships in 13 years. There was no mistaking Bill's on-air cackle while doing talk shows at KABC.
Russell, Dan: KFWB, 1950s; KEZY, 1959. One of the officers of Radio Orange County that received the last AM frequency in Southern California. He was a program director.
Russell, Robby: KWIZ, 1995-96. Robby and The Nurse's Garage Mania Show, which is a mid 60s garage, punk psychedelic and frat rock show, which aired on the Internet at wpmd.org. 
Russell, Lew: KGFJ, 1957-58. He was known as Moon Dog. Unknown.

RUTKOWSKI, Ken: KFWB, 2012-14. Ken is one of the most broadly-informed and connected people in the media, entertainment and technology, according to a posting at the KFWB website. "Part pundit, part matchmaker, part strategist – Ken helps start-ups to multinational corporations understand the trends shaping their industries and connect with the people that matter.

A true industry insider, Ken’s relationships span key government leaders, founders and CxO’s of leading technology companies to studio executives; and small software companies innovating the next generation of MET products/services to IT outsourcers and consultants.

He enables clients to understand market dynamics and consistently out-maneuver their competition. Combining technology, rigorous research, in-depth analysis and a firm grasp of the competitive marketplace, his business intelligence team provides the information and insight that helps you craft strategy and identify opportunity."

His show, Business Rockstars, was dropped by KFWB in March 2014.


Ryan, John: KMPC, 2002-05; KCBS/fm, 2006-09. John joined JACK/fm in early January 2006 and left three years later. He is now principal, managing director at Raygen Inc.
Ryan, Lori: KEZY, 1993-96; KFI, 1996-99; KNX, 1999-2001; KBIG, 2001-06; KRLA, 2010-13. Lori did traffic for a number of stations. She now lives in Arkansas.
Ryan, Mike: KKLA, 1992-93. Mike is in the financial industry in Texas.
Ryan, Nick: KWIZ, 1977-78. Nick went on to become a celebrity in Fresno radio and tv. In 2005, he was sentenced to 78 years-to-life in prison for sexually molesting young boys..

(Julia Rogers, Jim Roope, Kai Ryssdal, and John Rabe)

Ryder, Max: SEE Chris Leary
Ryder, Turi: KMPC/KTZN, 1996-97; KFI, 1997-98. Turi began working latenight on WGN-Chicago in early 2013. In addition to making a living doing fill-in talk from her Bay Area studio since 2006, she has been heard on the CBS Radio Network since 2007 with three, weekly, short humor features called "Turi Ryder's Exception to the Rule"? Turi edited and contributed to all four of Valerie Geller's Creating/Beyond Powerful Radio series. She's the new Sunday host of Envision Radio's America Weekend.

RYDGREN, John: KRLA, 1972; KRTH, 1977-82; KRLA, 1985; KRTH, 1986-88. "Brother John" had a unique place in Southern California radio.

Born in North Dakota, he grew up in Seattle. In 1958 John graduated with a divinity degree from Pacific Lutheran University in Washington and became an ordained Lutheran minister. John was one of the first people to use rock music in religious radio programs. He began his radio work in Minneapolis when he taped a Christian rock show called "Silhouettes" from a church basement. The show became so popular that it was nationally syndicated, and he was chosen to direct the American Lutheran Church's national tv, radio and film department. John was the voice of ABC's pro-album Love Format in 1968. In 1970, John left WABC/FM to produce religious and socially slanted radio/tv programs. He moved to L.A. in 1972 and eventually hosted a program called "Heaven Is in Your Mind."

In 1982, John suffered a debilitating stroke while on the air, which left him with a form of dyslexia, forcing him to relearn reading and speaking from the third-grade level. Doctors predicted that he would never be able to talk again. However, with therapy he rejoined KRTH in 1986. Randy Gardner talked about the opportunity to have worked with John: "What a dear sweet soul! He had come full circle. He had to voice track his show between records during his relearning period." John died in his favorite easy chair on the day after Christmas 1988, of a heart attack. He was 56. Beasley Broadcasting's Allen Shaw said that John "was unusual during the cultural revolution of the late '60s."

Ryker, Malcolm: KNAC, 1994-95. For the past five years, Malcolm has been apd and production/imaging director at "91X" in San Diego.
Ryssdal, Kai: Kai has been the host and senior editor of Marketplace, public radio’s program on business and the economy, since 2005. He joined American Public Media in 2001 as the host of Marketplace Morning Report. Ryssdal began in public radio as a intern, then reporter and finally substitute host for The California Report at KQED/fm in San Francisco. After graduating from Emory University, Ryssdal spent eight years in the United States Navy flying from the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt and as a Pentagon staff officer. Before his career in public radio, Ryssdal was a member of the United States Foreign Service in Ottawa, Canada and Beijing, China.


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, 2014