Where Are They Now?
LARadio.com
Los Angeles Radio People, J
Compiled by Don Barrett

db@thevine.net

 

J

Jack, Cadillac: KQLZ, 1990-91. Cadillac-Jack Seville works at WOGL-Philadelphia.

JACK, Wolfman: XERB, 1966-71; XPRS, 1971-72; KDAY, 1972-73; KRTH, 1976; KRLA, 1984-87; XTRA, 1987. Wolfman Jack was born Robert Weston Smith in a gritty section of Brooklyn on January 21, 1938. His parents died when he was young, and he shuffled among relatives between stints in reform schools.

Wolfman got his start below the border on radio stations with mega-million watts of power, which was an inspiration for Francis Ford Coppola's American Graffiti. In the film his role took on mythical proportions and catapulted his trademark guttural shriek to national prominence. "I'm not a gimmick," he told the LA Times in 1972. "I'm doing me. I wanted to perpetuate a mystique by not appearing in public but that's been over for some time." He once said of the movie, "It took the Wolfman from a cult figure to the rank of American flag and apple pie."

While working on Mexican radio stations, the Wolfman did an incredible mail order business selling Baby Jesuses that glowed in the dark and sugar pills that supposedly helped with arousal problems. Wolfman owned the business end of the Tijuana-based station. "I ran the campiest radio station around; we programmed what no one else wanted - preachers and rhythm and blues." Before XERB, Wolfman spent 1959 to 1962 at XERF-Del Rio.  

Wolfman reflected on his style in a lengthy Times interview: "My regular voice sounded like a little kid's and I knew that if I was going to make it, I needed a far-out style." He traveled the small towns, selling the ads, fixing the transmitter and screaming into the mike in small towns. He was influenced by "The Hound" at WKBW-Buffalo, Alan Freed and Murray the K.

 In 1973 he went to WNEW and WNBC-New York. He had his own radio show syndicated to more than 2,000 stations throughout the United States and 53 other countries at his height of popularity. He was the announcer on NBC/TV's Midnight Special for 8 years between 1973 and 1982. Wolfman started at KRLA January 14, 1984. His shaggy hair was sculpted to look like what the well-dressed wolf was wearing. Wolfman appeared in such films as Hanging on a Star in 1976, Motel Hell in 1980 and Mortuary Academy in 1987. He appeared as himself in a two-part episode of tv's Galactica 1980. In the fall of 1984, he debuted Wolfman Rock TV, an ABC Saturday morning children's program that featured rock gossip, information and videos. During the late '80s and early '90s, he hosted an oldies tv show out of Florida called Rock 'n Roll Palace.

He was immortalized in 18 songs including Clap for the Wolfman by the Guess Who, Living on the Highway by Freddie King and Wolfman Jack by Todd Rundgren. By the spring of 1995 his authorized biography Have Mercy: The True Story of Wolfman Jack, The Original Rock 'n' Roll Animal was published. Following a 20-city tour promoting the book, he collapsed after returning to his Belvidere, North Carolina home 120 miles east of Raleigh.

He died July 1, 1995. He was a heavy smoker and overweight but had lost 40 pounds shortly before his death. At the time of his death he was syndicating a live four-hour weekly show to 70 stations from Planet Hollywood in Washington, DC. At his funeral in Belvidere, mourners heard the Wolfman blaring from a jukebox. His black, broad-brimmed hat with a silver band rested atop his gray marble headstone with the kicker, "One more time." His longtime publicist said of the funeral, "Wolfman wanted a party. He wanted a celebration. He's not gone; he'll be around as long as people are playing the music he loved." He was one of five nominees to the Museum of Broadcast Communications' 1995 Radio Hall of Fame, in the pioneer category. From his book: "I'm Wolfman Jack, the guy who used to wash cars in Brooklyn and got lucky."

Jack the Ripper: SEE Michael Davis

JACKSON, Andrea: KYSR, 1999-2000. Andrea started her broadcasting career in San Diego working for AirWatch Communications. “I went by Andrea Cochran covering airborne traffic and breaking news for KSDO, KSON and ‘KBEST 95.’ I went on to KGTV/TV doing more traffic and breaking news from the helicopter, while delivering radio reports for ‘92.5, the Flash.’”

She became a weekday morning tv weathercaster at San Diego’s Channel 10. Andrea covered the Academy Awards for the San Diego outlet. She wrapped up her San Diego career at KGTV and “91X with an Emmy nomination and a SPJ award, moving to Los Angeles in early 1999 to pursue broadcasting and acting work. She started with Metro Networks on a part-time fill-in basis and was full time on KYSR and KNBC/Channel 4 by early 2000.

Andrea hosts "The Daily Buzz" and is also the creator of wakeupcall.tv, a video newscast app for the iPhone and iPad under the banner of her own production company Stable 8 Inc. One of Jackson's biggest highlights as host and managing editor of "The Daily Buzz" (2002-2009) was pulling 9.2G's with the USAF Thunderbirds in the Lockheed Martin F-16!

Jackson was most recently a morning reporter and weekend anchor for the NBC affiliate WESH in Orlando, covering the Casey Anthony trial. She joined the WESH team as a part-time breaking news reporter for WESH 2 News "Sunrise" in January of 2011.

Jackson, Bill: Bill is the announcer who steers motorists through the maze at Los Angeles International Airport.

 

(Jason Jeffries, Ken Jeffries, and Bill Jones)

JACKSON, Bob: KBBQ, 1967-70; KLAC, 1971-73. Bob passed away October 3, 2009, at the age of 79.

Bob was a popular Country music personality. Prior to Los Angeles radio, Bob was known in San Diego as Robin Scott at KDEO and KCBQ. “In 1965, Sonny Jim Price had me help out then-Robin Scott, assist with his remotes when he would broadcast at the custom car shows,” remembers Shotgun Tom Kelly. “He was always very kind to me when I was in high school. I will always remember how nice he was to the young kid who wanted to be in radio.” 

Bob was previously pd at KRAM-Las Vegas. Born in Oklahoma, Bob spent a decade in San Francisco when he left the Southland in the mid-1970s. He worked with Metromedia and Malrite. In 1989 Bob joined the Satellite Music Network in Phoenix. Later he moved to Wichita Falls, where he spent his remaining years writing songs, singing and playing the sax.  

Jackson, Bubba: KLON, 1984-92; KCSN, 2007; KKJZ, 2007-08. Bubba works at all-Jazz, KKJZ.
Jackson, Dion: KNAC, 1972; KLOS, 1976-77; KLSX, 1988-95; KLOS, 1999-2007. Dion works swing at KLOS.
Jackson, J.J.: KLOS, 1971-79; KWST, 1980; KROQ, 1987; KMPC/FM/KEDG, 1987-89; KLOS, 2000-02; KTWV, 2002-03. JJ died of an apparent heart attack on March 17, 2004. He was 62.
Jackson, JoeAnn: KMPC, 1977-79, K-LITE 1979. JoeAnn covered stories from City Hall and the Police Department. Robert W. Morgan referred to her as "Action Jackson." She died March 19, 1999, of ovarian cancer at the age of 54.
Jackson, Keith: KABC. Keith is the premier college football announcer.

JACKSON, Michael: KHJ, 1963-65; KNX, 1965; KABC, 1966-1998; KRLA, 1999; KLAC, 2001-02; KNX, 2004-05; KGIL, 2007-08. The former rock and roll dj was a midday mainstay at News/Talk KABC for over three decades. Michael’s father owned several pubs in London and when he was 11, the family moved to South Africa, where Michael became fluent in Afrikaans.  But he always imagined himself in radio, and by the time he was 16 (and finished high school) he was on the air in Johannesburg, having lied about his age. He trained with the BBC.

Michael started his American radio career in Springfield, Massachusetts and moved quickly to the Bay Area where he played rock music at KYA and KEWB. In San Francisco he was known as Michael Scotland, and his program was called "Scotland's Yard."

In 1963, Michael hosted a two-hour Hootenanny show on KHJ. In 1965, when the format switched to "Boss Radio," he moved to KNX. The same year he became a U.S. citizen and married into Hollywood royalty. His wife Alana is the daughter of the late actor Alan Ladd, the man who played Shane. He won a local Emmy while hosting KCOP/Channel 13's The Big Question series. 

A 1974 LA Times profile said, "He is of small stature, as compact as a lightweight boxer. His facial expression is one of bemused, continental curiosity - a man secure in all things intellectual but having too good a time to be excessively tweedy." 

Michael has won seven Emmys and four Golden Mike awards. He has also received many other honors, including Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (M.B.E.) presented by  Queen Elizabeth, the French Legion of Merit Award, presented by president Mitterand in 1988, and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1984. 

In the spring of 1984, he suffered a minor heart attack at the age of 50 while riding horseback through Griffith Park. Journalist Norman Cousins advised Michael during his recuperation period and told him, "A heart attack is something to laugh at. It really is."

In 1992 he was off the air for almost two months following heart surgery.  In the summer of 1997, Michael moved to weekends on KABC, eventually leaving the station in 1999. He was a regular substitute for Larry King on CNN.

Jackson, Paul "Action": KROQ, 1999-2000. Paul joined the morning team with Kevin & Bean in the summer of 1999. Unknown.

(Kevin "Slow Jammin'" James; JoeAnn Jackson; Ron Jacobs; and Bill Jenkins)

Jackson, Pervis: KGFJ, 1973. Unknown.

JACKSON, Sammy: KBBQ, 1968; KLAC, 1969-72; KGIL, 1973-75; KLAC, 1976-79; KMPC, 1982-83. The one-time star of television's No Time for Sergeants was born and raised in Henderson, North Carolina. Sammy was on ABC/TV in the early 1960s. A string of unsold series pilots followed, and he was dropped by Warner Bros. Sammy had roles in several 1960s movies including Disney's Boatniks. He commented on his move to radio: "TV is a great avocation. I still do four or five guest shots a year. I'd be dishonest if I told you that if someone offered me a regular spot in a series, I wouldn't take it." He described his radio talent: "I don't do voices or one-liners. What I do is emphasize the music - the writers of a particular song or the story behind it. I'm a friendly on-air companion." While at KLAC he featured mid-morning interviews with some of the biggest stars in Hollywood. Sammy was voted Best Country Jock of the Year at the 6th Annual Billboard Radio Programming Forum in 1973. In 1980 he was voted the CMA Country personality of the year. An LA Times critic noted in 1981 that Sammy "has quietly and efficiently established a reputation as one of the finest radio personalities in the country." He went to Las Vegas in the late 1980s to work for KUDA.

Sammy died of heart failure April 24, 1995. He was 58.

Jackson, Tommy: KPWR, 1996; KBIG, 1997. Tommy works at Shadow Broadcast Services and production at Westwood One.
Jackson, Walt: KFI, 2003-05. Walt broadcasts traffic at KFI.
Jacobs, Jake: KNX, 1976-91. Jake has passed away.

 

(Jamie & Danny, Linda Jean, and Revin John)

Jacobs, Josh: KKLA, 1994-99; KFSH, 2001-04. In addition to hosting a show at Christian Pirate Radio, Josh does overnights at KFSH, "the Fish."
Jacobs, Larry: KLOS, 1977-82. Since 1984, Larry has been a news correspondent with ABC Network Radio.
Jacobs, Ron: KHJ, 1965-69. Ron lives in Hawaii.
Jacobs, Vic "the Brick": KIIS, 1990-97; KXTA, 1997-2005; KLAC, 2005-12. Vic works at KLAC and is part of the afternoon Loose Cannon Show.
Jacobson, Julie: KZLA, 2000. SEE Gene & Julie
Jacques, Truman: KABC, 1995-97. Truman serves as director of communications for the City of Inglewood.

(Jeffrey James, Don Jeffrey, Marques Johnson, and Truman Jacques)

Jager, Rick: KHJ, 1975-80; KWST, 1981-82; KNWZ, 1983-84. Rick is the senior media relations executive for the Los Angeles Metropolitan County Transportation Authority.
Jahad, Shirley: KPCC, 2003-07. Shirley worked as afternoon host of “All Things Considered."
James, Chris: KYSR, 1999-2000. Chris worked swing at "Star 98.7" Unknown.

 

JAMES, Chuck: KGFJ, 1961-65; KDAY, 1965. Chuck began his radio career in the late 1950s in the basement of his Philadelphia home. He rigged a radio station setup and rehearsed his dj style. His first job was at WTEL-Philadelphia. “My first day on the job was a cold and snowy one and on the way into the station I dropped all my albums and notes in the snow. I trudged into the station and when the engineer threw the first cue, I was speechless. The engineer quickly hit a record and gave me a pep talk. When the next cue came, there was no stopping me.”

Following a stop at WHAT-Philadelphia, Chuck joined KGFJ. “I loved this gig, but a sad and tragic event was being part of the funeral entourage at the late great Sam Cooke’s burial.” He left KGFJ when he was asked to replace Larry McCormick at KDAY when Larry left radio to pursue his newscasting career. Chuck also worked at Armed Forces Radio. Chuck left radio in the late 1960s to pursue an acting career, where he enjoyed many stage successes and a few movie roles. Today Chuck goes by his birth name, Peter Christopher, and is a businessman living in Glendale. He has four grandchildren. “I never lost my love for radio. I have a nostalgia show in the works.”

James, Daphne: KJLH, 1994-96. Unknown.
James, Doug: KGIL, 1965-68. Doug lives in Las Vegas and owns Dispensary, a cocktail lounge.
James, Jeffrey: KXMX, 1999, KPLS, 2000, KCAA, 2005, KLAA, 2007. Jeffrey lives in Biloxi and working afternoon drive at WRJW- Picayune, Mississippi.
James, Keith: KMAX, 1994-95. Unknown.
James, Kevin: KABC, 2003-07; KRLA, 2007-11. Attorney Kevin hosted the all-night KABC Red Eye Radio until leaving in March 2007. He joined KRLA for late nights two months later. Kevin left the Salem station in late 2011 to run for Mayor of Los Angeles. Following his loss in the mayoral race, Kevin was appointed to the Board of Public Works.
James, Kevin: KKBT, 1991-92 and 1994-98 and 1999-2003; KHHT, 2007-09. Kevin "Slow Jammin'" James hosted the Quiet Storm on XHRM/Magic 92.5 in San Diego until early 2012.

(Fred Jones and John & Jeff)

James, Michael: KRLA, 2008-09. Michael reports traffic and news for KRLA and owns and operates a wine shoppe in San Pedro called Off The Vine.
James, Peter: KNAC, 1978-80; KROQ, 1980-83; KWST, 1983-85. For the past 18 years, Peter Spatz has been in the automotive business in Oxnard.
James
, Rollye: KPOL, 1979; KMPC, 1980; KHTZ, 1980; KGIL; KLAC; KMPC, 1990; KFI, 1990-91. Rollye is syndicating her own Talk show out of Philadelphia.
James, Ryan: KFSH, 2004-11. Ryan works the all-night shift at Christian "FISH."
James, Scott: KZLA, 1999-2001. Scott died February 6, 2005. He was 39 years old.
James, Summer: KCAL, 2006-07; KYSR, 2007-08. Summer works at KHAY-Ventura. She's working on some tv shows as creator and host.
James, Victoria: KMET, 1967. Unknown.
Jamie & Danny: KYSR, 1999-2005. Jamie White and Danny Bonaduce hosted mornings at "Star 98.7" until Danny left in the summer of 2005. Jamie stayed with STAR 98.7 until early 2007.

   

(Billy Juggs, JJ Johnson, Jorge Jarrin, Helen Jones, and Cadillac Jack)

JAMISON, Bob: KMPC, 1991-92. Bob was in the Angels broadcast booth in the early 90s. He’s now a CPA of advanced planning for the Federated Funeral Directors of America in Illinois. He checked in recently. “In 1992, there were two memorable moments: In May one of the team’s two buses crashed on the way to Baltimore from New York [I was on the other bus]. In October, George Brett got his 3,000th hit in a game at Anaheim Stadium. Before joining the Angels’ broadcasts, I worked 16 years in the minor leagues, 12 of those in Nashville. I have not broadcast since leaving the Angels. It was a great time being with the team and living in So Cal.” 

Janisse, James: KLON, 1992-2002/KKJZ, 2002-06. James is producing and hosting an Internet program called "The Wonderful World of Jazz" at KCLAFM.com on Friday mornings. He's also on the Board of Directors of Mary-Lind Recovery Centers Inc., which is a series of residential substance abuse recovery facilities. 

JANKOWSKI, Judy: KLON, 1994-2002 / KKJZ, 2002-05. Judy was the general manager at KLON/KKKZ from 1994-2005. She died December 17 and was 61. An obituary in the Long Beach Press Telegram described Judy as having “a big heart and she was known for her warm, friendly smile.” The obituary did not mention the cause of death.  She started as the traffic manager at WOUB in Athens, Ohio, and held a series of top management positions that took her to Birmingham, Houston, Pittsburgh, and finally the Long Beach State radio station.  

"She visited 49 of the U.S. states, only missing Wisconsin," her brother said. "She traveled to China, Japan, Cuba, Russia, Egypt, Italy, Morocco, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Mexico and Canada during her lifetime."  

Jankowski was very proud of her Polish heritage.

Janssen, Dick: KLAC/KMET, 1968-70. The former president of Scripps-Howard Broadcasting ran KLAC and KMET in the late 1960s. Dick was gm for the launch of the legendary Cleveland AOR station, "the Buzzard," WMMS. In late 1970 he became vp of operations for Nationwide Broadcasting. Dick retired to Scottsdale in late 1992. "I get to improve my golf game living in Arizona."
Jaramillo, Fernando: KLAX/KMJR/KNJR, 2000. Fernando joined the three Spanish Broadcasting System stations as pd in late summer 2000.

JARRETT, Hugh: KBBQ, 1968-70. From 1954 until 1958, Hugh sang bass in the quartet the Jordanaires, and his distinctive vocals can be heard on many of Elvis Presley's key recordings, including Hound Dog, Don't Be Cruel and All Shook Up. Born in Nashville on October 11, 1929, Hugh died in Atlanta on May 31, 2008, of injuries sustained in an automobile accident. He was 78.

Jarrett grew up with a love of vocal harmony. Born in Nashville in 1929, he sang in gospel quartets and worked on local radio. He admired the Jordanaires, a group which provided vocal backings for the artists on the Grand Ole Opry radio show and toured with country music packages. When, in 1954, their bass singer, Culley Holt, left he was replaced by Jarrett. 

At the time, the Jordanaires would go to Chicago each week to perform on a television show hosted by the country star Eddy Arnold. When Arnold played in Memphis, they spoke to the teenage Elvis Presley backstage, who said, "If I ever cut a record, I want you guys singing with me." 

The Jordanaires were not involved in Presley's Sun Recordings but they joined him for a television appearance on The Steve Allen Show in New York on 1 July 1956. The following day, they recorded Hound Dog, Don't Be Cruel and Any Way You Want Me together. As always, they worked out their vocal parts – the "bop bops" and "doody wahs" – within a few minutes. Elvis was so taken by the results that he asked RCA to put them on the label, even though the Jordanaires were signed to Capitol, and their name appeared on singles starting with Too Much in 1957. They also backed Ricky Nelson (Believe What You Say), Marty Robbins (A White Sport Coat) and Ferlin Husky (Gone). 

In 1960, Jarrett joined a radio station, WLAC in Nashville, working as "Big Hugh Baby" and organised many record hops. Briefly, he had some success as part of the Statues, recording "Blue Velvet", and in the late 1960s formed the Hugh Jarrett Singers. 

In 1970, Jarrett moved to Atlanta and continued as a DJ, also singing when time permitted. He was modest about his contributions, saying of Elvis, "We had fun, worked very hard and maybe did something that no one else had done."

JARRIN, Jaime: KTNQ/KLVE, 1979-86; KWKW, 1955-79 and 1986-2007; KHJ, 2007-14. Enshrined broadcaster Hall of Fame at Cooperstown, Jaime has been the Spanish broadcast voice of the LA Dodgers for close to a half century.

Jarrin, among the most recognizable voices in Hispanic broadcasting, will begin his 48th season in the radio booth as "the Spanish Voice of the Dodgers." He became the club's No. 1 Spanish-language broadcaster in 1973, 14 years after he first joined the club.

The native of Ecuador was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame on July 26, 1998 in Cooperstown, NY as the recipient of the Ford C. Frick Award. With that honor, he became only the second Spanish-language announcer to be inducted into the Hall of Fame, joining Buck Canal. 

Jarrin was the first recipient of the Southern California Broadcaster Association's President's Award in February 1998 and in January 2005, he was honored by the Southern California Sports Broadcasters with the foreign-language broadcaster of the year award, one year after being inducted into the organization’s Hall of Fame.

During the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, Jarrin was in charge of all Spanish radio coverage and production. He has called more than 30 world championship boxing title bouts throughout the world for radio and television stations in Latin America and has broadcast the Major League Baseball All-Star Game, League Championship Series and World Series on numerous occasions.

The Dodgers, with Jarrin and longtime English-language broadcaster Vin Scully, are the only Major League club to feature a pair of Hall of Fame announcers. 

Jarrin, Jorge: KABC, 1985-2011. KSKQ. Jorge was the helicopter reporter in "Jet Copter 790" on KABC for over a quarter of a century. He left KABC on 10.26.11, following the Cumulus purchase of Citadel/LA. He is involved in the Spanish marketing area for the Dodger organization.

   

(Jessie Jessup, Dion Jackson, Bob Jimenez, Jake Jacobs, and Michael James)

JARVIS, Al: KELW/KFWB, 1932-60; KLAC, 1960-62; KHJ, 1962; KFWB, 1962; KEZY, 1962-63; KNOB, 1967. "Wanted: Man to Talk on the Radio." A record store owner in Hollywood thought if he could get someone to play "records" on the radio, it would help sell them. Al became a jock after answering that ad in 1932 and he was a pioneer and long considered the originator of the "Make Believe Ballroom" on KFWB (station was owned by the Warner brothers, hence the WB).

Al was born in Winnipeg, Canada and went to Roosevelt High School in L.A. where he performed a speech from The Merchant of Venice to win a Shakespeare Contest and a stint at the Pasadena Playhouse. An article in the OC Register quoted Al on his beginning: "A few weeks after I got the job at KELW in 1932 I was hounding the owner-manager to let me air pop records instead of those electrical transcriptions. By using commercial records, I figured, I would not only have a more diversified program, but I could present some of the world's great stars. It was the first time on radio, it was the first time any records were played. That's how the 'Make Believe Ballroom' was born."

Al has been credited with the discovery of Nat "King" Cole, Jimmy Boyd, Frankie Laine and Gogi Grant. He was at KFWB for the launch of Chuck Blore's "Color Radio" on January 2, 1958, and worked nine to noon. He never totally accepted the music transition but acknowledged rock music: "Top 40 programming has apparently satisfied the needs of a majority of the music- and record-conscious audience." He once said of Elvis Presley: "If he were a Negro and performed as he does now, he would be put in jail. I know this is true, because it has happened to singers. But because Elvis has white skin, they let him get away with it."

In the spring of 1960 he left KFWB and joined KLAC in the midday slot; he also hosted a local tv show with Betty White. In 1962 he became a vp at DRA Records (he owned a record store on Hollywood Blvd in the late 1940s). Later that year he teamed with his wife, Marilyn, to do a music and interview show with Hollywood stars on KHJ for an hour at midnight. In 1967 he worked his "Make Believe Ballroom" magic during morning drive on KNOB. Al died May 6 1970 of a heart attack and at the time was a sales executive with KLAC. He was 61.

Jaxson, Tommy: KFI, 1984-85; KOST, 1985-91; KYSR, 1992-93; KXEZ, 1993-96; KBIG, 1997; KMLT, 1999-2002; KNX, 2005-13. Tommy hosted drive time traffic at KNX until his exit at the end of 2013.
Jay, George: KHJ; KFWB. George died December 7, 2003, at the age of 85.
Jay, Lyman: KGRB, 1983; KORG, 1993. Lyman died in late 2003.
Jay, Steve: SEE Jay Stevens
Jaye, Don: KCBH, 1966-69; KDAY, 1969-71. Don was gm at KCBH (later KJOI) and operations director at KDAY. Before leaving the Southland, Don hosted a variety show at KCOP/Channel 13. Don attended the University of Notre Dame before starting his radio career at WHOT-South Bend and then on to WSAI-Cincinnati and WJJD-Chicago. For more than a quarter century, Don raised thousands of dollars for Southern Nevada charities, but he lived his last decade, and died, near poverty and battling ill health. "Don had the biggest heart and would work hard to help anyone, even to the detriment of his own health and well-being," said longtime friend Ira David Sternberg, a journalist and fellow broadcaster. "He was always out in the community doing good work for good causes." Donald Jaye Illes, a leading lay member of the Catholic Church and a member of the Nevada Broadcasters Hall of Fame, died July 21, 2001, of respiratory problems. He was 63. A survivor of several heart attacks and two open-heart surgeries, Don was forbidden by his doctors from working at a regular job, so he threw himself into charity work full time, friends said. Since 1993 he lived on $670 a month from Social Security, $50 a month from the Department of Veterans Affairs and $10 a month in food stamps, all the while serving on the boards of three nonprofit organizations. He rarely complained nor sought praise, friends said. Born November 25, 1937, in South Bend, Indiana, Don was an altar boy at a church at the nearby University of Notre Dame. He studied for the priesthood before serving in the Air Force and going into broadcasting.
Jean, Linda: KIKF, 1995-98; KXMX, 2000; KMXN, 2000-01. Linda worked middays at KMXN in the Inland Empire. She's now teaching.
Jed the Fish: KORG; KROQ, 1978-84 and 1985-2012; KCSN, 2012. Jed joined KCSN for weekends in early 2012. He officially left KROQ in late 2012.
Jeffrey, Don: KIKF, 1985-90; KFRG, 1990-2004. Don, aka, Hopalong Cassidy, is the md at "K-FROG" and he works afternoon drive. 
Jeffrey, Scott: KHJ, 1980. See Lon Helton.
Jeffreys, Dave: KHJ/fm, 1970-72; KRTH, 1972. It is believed that Dave has passed away.

 

 

(Frank Jolle, Robin Johnson, Scott James, Steve Jay, and Dave Joseph)

Jeffries, Andrew: KBIG, 2009-14. Andrew was appointed program director at MY/fm (KBIG) in February 2009. He now oversees both MY/fm and KOST.
Jeffries
, Jan: KFRG/KHTX, 1995. Jan is program director at KRAK-Sacramento.
Jeffries, Jason: KLSX, 1992-94; KKLA, 1994-97; KLTX, 1997-98; KIEV, 1998-2001; KRLA, 2000-11. Jason is director of long-form programming for the Salem properties in L.A. 
Jeffries, Ken: KFWB, 1989-2009; KFWB, 2011-14. Ken was a news anchor at all-News KFWB until a format flip in September 2009. He's now a producer for Money 101 at KNX.
Jenkins, Bill: KGBS, 1967-68; KFWB, 1968-73; KFI, 1974; KGBS, 1974-76; KFI, 1976-77; KABC, 1978-91; KTLK, 2005. Bill hosted "Need to Know" on "K-TALK" weekends.
Jennrich, Phil: KLAC/KZLA. Unknown.
Jensen, Jeff: KQLZ, 1991-92. Jeff returned to Tampa.
Jeremiah, David: KMPC, 1994. David is a voiceover actor.
Jessup, Jessie: KLYY, 1999. Jessie worked middays at "Y107" until late 1999 when the station changed to Spanish-speaking. She is now at KDGE-Dallas.
Jessup, Sioux-z: Sioux-z is doing traffic at Time Warner Cable stations SoCal 101 and HD 354.
Jeter, Cindie: KMPC, 1982-83. Cindie works at KZIM-Cape Girardeau, Missouri, doing news and talk.

JILLSON, Joyce: KABC, 1979-89. Joyce was a world famous astrologer. She died October 1, 2004 of kidney failure and had been suffering with diabetes. Joyce was 57.

She was a regular contributor to Ken & Bob morning show and she had a weekend talk show on KABC in the late '80s where she dispensed astrological forecasts to callers.

During her time at KABC she subbed for Michael Jackson. Joyce's syndicated daily horoscope column was published in over 100 papers nationally and 50 internationally. Her astrological studies began in early childhood when she was chosen to be the only protégé of well-known Boston astrologer Maude Williams. By the age of ten she was charting predictions on events ranging from the stock market to politics. Joyce was a best-selling author, having ranked on the New York Times best-seller list for 28 straight weeks. She has been featured in every major publication and many major network tv shows. Joyce starred in comedy routines with Avery Schreiber on tv. She also starred in Supergirl and tv's Peyton Place. Joyce was an astrologer with an astronomic appetite for publicity.

Her prediction for fellow Capricorns on the day she died was: "You're bound to have a good time and meet interesting people."

Jimenez, Bob: KFWB, 1998-2002. Former KFWB senior correspondent, Bob Jimenez, is an adjunct professor in the Annenberg School of Communications at USC. In addition, he is president of Icon Imaging, a public relations firm founded with his wife, former tv political reporter, Sharon Jimenez. Bob consulted on the Hollywood and Valley Independence campaigns.   

(Summer James, John & Ken, Dick Joy and Andrew Jeffries)

Jobson, Wayne: KROQ, 1992-2003; KDLE, 2004. Wayne hosts a reggae program at Indie 103.1.
John, Captain: SEE John Lodge
John & Jeff, KLSX, 1998-2009. The syndicated pair worked late night at KLSX until a format flip to AMP RADIO. Pair can be heard on JohnJeff.com and CRN Digital Radio.
John & Ken: KFI, 1992-99; KABC, 1999-2000; KFI, 2001-14. John Kobylt and Ken Champiou returned to afternoon drive at KFI on April 30, 2001 and have dominated the commute home for over a decade. Their show was added to the WOR-New York line-up in early 2013.

JOHN, Revin: KBIG, 2007. Born and raised in Johannesburg, South Africa, Revin now works middays at KBFF-Portland. After leaving Southern California, he worked for a year in Dubai in the UAE.

Johns, George: KMLT, 2005-10. George was a consultant to the Amaturo group, which included the JILL/fm stations in Thousand Oaks and Orange County.
Johnson, Ben Patrick: KABC, 1992-94. Ben was the image voice at KABC, Entertainment Tonight and Judge Joe Brown.
Johnson, Bruce: KFAC, 1969-71; KLAC, 1971-72; KHJ, 1972-75. Bruce owns stations in Palm Springs and Idaho.

       

(Shirley Jahad; Michael Josephson; and Josh Jacobs)

Johnson, Charlie: KMPC, 1967-69. Charlie has passed away.
Johnson, Chuck: KTYM, 1962. The former general manager at KTYM died July, 27, 2004, at the age of 66.
Johnson, Fred: KCSN, 2000-09. Fred was the gm at the Cal State Northridge station until the spring of 2009.
Johnson, Harry: KOST, 1977-82; KBIG, 1983-88. Harry went on to teaching broadcasting at Santa Monica City College, along with a voiceover career. He's now retired and living in Palm Springs.
Johnson, JJ: KDAY, 1974-91; KMPC; KJLH, 1992; KKBT, 1993-94; KACE, 1994-2000; KMLT, 2002-05; KKBT, 2006; KRBV, 2007. JJ worked weekends and fill-in at KRBV, "V-100." He does free-lance production work.
Johnson, Marques: KFWB, 2014. Marques joined morning drive at the launch of all-Sports format at KFWB, The Beast 980. Most recently he was a basketball analyst for Fox Sports Net. He was a forward in the National Basketball Association (NBA) from 1977–89, where was a five-time All-Star. He played with the Milwaukee Bucks, LA Clippers and Golden State Warriors. Marques played for UCLA and won a national championship in 1975.
Johnson, Mike: KLON, 1986-88; KMNY, 1988-91; KMPC, 1991-93; KKGO/KMZT/KGIL/KSUR, 1990-2012. Mike is operations director for the Saul Levine stations and all-nights at KKGO.
Johnson, Richard: KKLA, 2001-02. Richard reported the news at KKLA.
Johnson, Robin: Robin worked at Shadow Traffic.
Johnson, Ron: KPPC, 1971-73; KROQ, 1973. Ron runs Dr. Sounds Audio Prescriptions, a service provided to those who need to locate songs for film tv and commercials.
Johnson, Van: KROQ, 1986-91. Van is the manager of the Mosquito Abatement Department of the LA County Department of Works.
Johnson
, Wayne: KEZY, 1964-65; KBIG. 1965-66. Wayne is retired and living in in Port Angeles, Washington.

 

(James Janisse, Rollye James, Keith Jackson, and Bubba Jackson)

Joliffe, John: KTZN, 1997. Unknown.
Jolle, Frank: KNAC, 1970-71 and 1972-74; KHJ; KKDJ, 1971-72; KROQ; KYMS, 1972. Frank owns and operates an independent film company that produces movies for tv and theatrically released films. He also does a show on Money 105.5 Salem Broadcasting in Sacramento.
Jonathan, Peter: KHJ, 1963-65. Peter was last heard to be living in Buffalo.
Jones, Bill: KLIT, 1990-93. Bill works at Westwood One and has an active voiceover career.
Jones, Bob: KHJ/fm: 1966. Unknown.
Jones, Brooke: KUTE, 1986; KACE, 1990-92; KAJZ/KBJZ, 1992-94. Brooke worked morning drive at KUTE. Unknown.
Jones, Buster: KGFJ, 1971-76; KMPC, 1976; KUTE, 1977-85. Buster is working on a book.
Jones, Chuck: KDAY, 1965. Unknown.
Jones, Dana: KPPC/KROQ, 1973. Dana is a professional photographer, based in Palos Verdes Pennisula.
Jones, David K: KOST, 1982-85. David has an active voiceover career.
Jones, Fred: KNAC, 1971-73. Fred, the former program director at KNAC, died on December 4, 2009, after suffering a stroke. Beginning in 1974, Fred went on to quite the career as a studio owner, engineer, producer and noted audio industry figure. At KNAC he was known as “General Bird Dog.” During his career he received two Grammy Award nominations and won countless prestigious advertising awards, including 11 CLIOs, IBAs, Beldings, Addys, BPMEs and numerous others. Among the artists Fred worked with were Loggins & Messina, Manhattan Transfer, Rita Coolidge, The Chambers Bros., James Earl Jones, Roy Rogers, Don Dorsey, Robin Williams, Joan Rivers, Stan Freberg, Steve Allen, Ray Bradbury and Gary Owens. But besides the many industry friends he leaves behind, Fred’s lasting legacy is the many classic albums he engineered/produced with The Firesign Theatre.
Jones, Geno: KJLH, 1990-92. Geno is working in Florida radio.

 

 

(Julie Jacobson, Ben Patrick Johnson, Jed the Fish, Kevin James, and Steve Jones)

Jones, Helen: KWRP. The long-time gm at KWRP has passed away.
Jones, Johnny: KDAY, 1974. Unknown.
Jones, Ken: KGFJ; KIIS, 1976; KIEV. Ken died in the early 1990s.
Jones, Phil: KLAX, 1999-2000. Phil left his pd slot at Spanish KLAX in the summer of 2000.
Jones, Sam: KPSA, 1971-72; KLAC; KJLH. Unknown.
Jones, Steve: KDLD, 2004-09. Steve, guitarist with the Sex Pistol, hosted Jonesy's Jukebox on Indie 103.1 until a format flip to Spanish in early 2009. Jonesy's Jukebox is now heard on IamRogue.com. He spent one season as a judge on The X Factor in 2011.
Jones, Tony: KTYM, 1974; KAGB, 1975; KACE, 1976, KJLH, 1972-84. Tony is retired from Northwest Airlines and government service.
Jordan, JJ: KHJ, 1975. In the mid-1990s JJ was hosting the syndicated show, "Lone Star Fishing."
Jordan, Steve: KTNQ, 1978. Steve is working in San Francisco radio.
Jordan, T. Michael: KMEN, 1967-68; KKDJ, 1973-74; KEZY, 1976-77. Tom is active in MIS work and lives in Illinois.
Joseph, Dave: KFWB, 2008; KSPN, 2011-13. Dave broadcasts hockey reports at KSPN. In early 2013, he was appointed PA voice for the LA Kings.

   

(JJ Jackson, Ron Johnson, and Ryan James)

Josephson, Michael: KNX, 1997-2011. The former law professor aired a daily commentary on all-News KNX dealing with passionate and inspirational essays on ethics in everyday life until the fall of 2011.
Joy, Bob: KWIZ, 1969-72; KDAY, 1972. Bob passed the bar examination and is practicing in Susanville.
Joy, Dick: KNX, late 40s-early 50s; KFAC, 1950s-70s. Dick died in 1996. He was living in Talent, Oregon.
Joyner
, Tom: KMAX, 1999; KKBT, 2006. Tom brought his syndicated show to KKBT, the BEAT, on June 19, 2006 and the show was dropped December 15, 2006.
Juggs, Billy: KLOS, 1977; KMET, 1977-85; KLSX, 1989-91. Billy works for NBC Asia.

JULIAN, Steve: KPCC, 2000-14. In the fall of 2000, Steve started hosting the "Morning Edition" at KPCC from five years at AirWatch America. He left KPCC in early 2004 and returned in the spring. Steve started his broadcasting career as a police dispatcher and served as a police officer in Baldwin Park. He also has studied massage and maintains a small clientele. Before two knee surgeries, Steve enjoyed hiking and racquetball; now he enjoys reminiscing. He's also actively involved in local theater productions, both as an actor and a playwright.

Julius, Myke: KKBT, 2006; KRVB, 2006-08. Mike joined evenings at KKBT, the BEAT, in the fall of 2006. KKBT changed calls to KRBV (V100) in late 2006. He left when Radio-One sold the station to Bonneville in the spring of 2008. Myke hosts Quiet Storm in San Diego at Urban AC XHRM (MAGIC 92.5).


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