Where Are They Now?
LARadio.com
Los Angeles Radio People, C
Compiled by Don Barrett

db@thevine.net

C

C, Mickey: KIKF, 1999-2000. Mickey Czegledy co-hosted the morning show at Country KIKF and she is involved in voiceover projects.
Cabranes, Bill: KWNK, 1996. Bill works for Telemundo in San Jose.

CADELL, Dr. Ava: KLSX, 1995 and 2000. Born in Budapest Hungary, Ava enjoyed success as an actress before earning her doctorate in Human Behavior and one in Human Sexuality. She is the founder of Loveology University. In her private practice in L.A., she counsels some of Hollywood's elite on a myriad of communication and sexual issues. Ava has produced a video called the Power of Seduction and an audio book, Between the Sheets. Other books she has written include: 12 Steps to Everlasting Love, 52 Weeks of Sizzling Sex, The Stock Market Orgasm, and The Tantra Workbook. She hosted a weekend talk show at KLSX.

Cadena, Lee: KPWR, 1997-99. Lee hosted the Low Rider show at Power 106. After KPWR he created and hosted "The Love Pad" for "Q104.7. He runs Lee Cadena Management and Teena Marie, Chino XL and Boo Taa T.R.I.B.E. are part of his talent roster. Since 2006, he is the owner/publisher of the publication, Tidbits of the Santa Clarita Valley.
Cadman, Robert: KWVE, 1986-2005. Robert is in real estate in the San Clemente area.
Cadwell, Clyde: KFVD/KPOP, 1957-58. Clyde passed away in the 1960s, while still in is forties.
Cady, Bob: KWIZ, 1982-85. Since KWIZ, Bob has been New York, Fresno, Palm Springs, Cedar Rapids, Omaha and now Burlington, VT where he’s up to his ass in snow doing mornings and loving it.
Cagle, Gerry: KHJ, 1974-75, pd. At the end of 2002, Gerry left Network Magazine Group after 10 years and is now with musicbiz.com.
Calcotte, Gordon: KIEV, 1966. Unknown.
Calder, Bill: KHJ, 1962-64. Bill died of prostate cancer in 1990.
Cala, Joe: KFWB, 1983-2006; KNX, 2006-14. Joe broadcasts sports at all-News KNX. In 2013, he was inducted into the Southern California Sports Broadcasters Hall of Fame.
Calamar, Gary: KCRW, 1997-2014. Gary works weekends at KCRW. He's been nominated for four Grammy awards.

(Gary Cocker, Gary Calamar, Steve Counts, and Raul Campos)

Calderone, Tom: KLSX, 1996; KLYY, 1997-98. Tom is president of VH1.
Callaghan, Mike: KPPC 1970-73; KWST 1973-74; KKDJ/KIIS/KXTA 1974-2013. Mike was chief engineer at KIIS/KXTA until the summer of 2013.
Calococci, Tom: KKBT, 2005-06. Tom was appointed pd at "The BEAT" in late spring 2005 and left in the summer of 2006. After five years as operations manager at WPOW-Miami, he left in the spring of 2011. In the spring of 2013, Tom was appointed pd of Cox's AC Miami station WFLC (97.3 Coast/fm). He left the Miami cluster in February 2014.
Cameron, Lee: KDIS, 1997-2000; KCMG/KHHT, 2000-02. Lee has a voiceover career.
Cameron, Myles: KHTZ, 1985; KBZT, 1986. Myles is news anchor at KSFO-San Francisco.

CAMPAGNA, Vince: KFWB, 1969-97. Vince was a longtime newsman for KFWB and contributor to the history of Southern California radio.

He began his radio career in 1953 in the Army’s AFRS in Fairbanks, Alaska. “After the service I cut my teeth and paid my dues in several major markets.” Before joining KFWB Vince produced and directed tv programming as well as programming an L.A. tv station.

During his 44 years in broadcasting, Vince accumulated a library filled with awards for meritorious achievements including a dozen years as KFWB’s entertainment critic. Vince wrote a final memo on the day he retired in 1997: “What more can I say. So many years. There are a lot of names I leave behind. But none that I will forget. All that will stay with me...in my mind, in my heart, in my Soul, till the day I die. Love and God speed, Vince.”

A few days before his death, Vince fell ill and was hospitalized for tests. He required surgery and died a few hours later on December 6, 1997. He was 64. Vince’s co-workers remember him as a man of journalistic integrity, fun and friendship.

Campbell, Gary: KHTZ, 1983; KZLA, 1983-2001; KKGO, 2006-14. Gary currently does a country show for Dial-Global networks, and works part time at KKGO, GoCountry 105."

   

(Rich Capparela, Johnny Chiang, Jim Carson, Ross Crystal, and Vicki Cox)

Campbell, John: KHTZ, 1983-86; KBZT, 1986. John is a part-time actor.
Campbell, Lori: KYMS, 1989-91. Lori has returned to school and is working on a degree in music and archeology.
Campbell, Stan: KLAC, 1989-93. Stan is based in Niagara Falls with his own production company, ZIPSPOTS.com. He owns a travel media consultancy promotions company, Travel Radio Network. He also hosts a two-hour Canadian syndicated Country show, "The Canadian Trucking Radio Show" and in the US, the "American Driver Radio."
Campbell, Wendell: KGBS, 1965. Wendell is deceased.
Campos, Raul: KCRW, 1999-20014. Raul works evenings at KCRW.

CAMPOS, Tonya: KNX/fm, 1988; KCBS/fm, 1991-94; KZLA, 1994-2006; KKGO, 2007-14. Tonya is program director and evening personality at Country KKGO.

She started her radio career at the age of 14 at a small AM station in Visalia. Within five years she was the evening host at KFYE-Fresno. She followed that with jobs at KBOS-Fresno and KSDO-San Diego. She came to Los Angeles in 1987 and worked for the Transtar Radio Network.

In 1994, she joined Country KZLA and became music director and apd. When KZLA dropped Country, Tonya worked for Lofton reek Records before joining KKGO.


Candullo, Steve: KKBT, 2006-07. Steve took over the gm duties at the BEAT in October 2006 and was there for a year.
Canning, Lisa: KDAY, 1986-90; KJLH, 1990; KKBT, 1993-97. Lisa was the leggy announcer on ABC's Into the Night Starring Rick Dees. In late 1995 she became an entertainment reporter for Entertainment Tonight. In the spring of 2000, she married Harold Austin. Lisa was part of the debut season of Dancing with the Stars.

   

(Alan Chlowitz and Nancy Cole)

Capparela, Rich: KUSC, 1980-83; KFAC, 1987-89; KJOI, 1989-90; KKGO, 1990-91; KUSC, 1993-96; KKGO/KMZT, 1996-2007; KUSC, 2007-14. Rich worked morning drive at all-Classical "K-Mozart" until a format flip to Country in February 2007. A week later he was working afternoons at KUSC.
Cappucci, Francesca: KIQQ, 1984. Francesca is involved in entertainment projects in the Southland.
Caprita, Dave: KTWV, 2003-12. Dave worked weekends at "The WAVE."
Carbone, Steve: KMPC, 2005. Steve was doing sports updates at KMPC 1540/The Ticket. He hosts his website, RealitySteve.com.
Carey
, Chuck: KNOB, 1957-58 and 1960; KLON, 1981-84. In addition to his work on jazz stations KNOB and KLON, Chuck was un locutor de discos en español en Monterrey, Nuevo León, México, de 1961 a 1963. He's now retired after a long career of working in IT.
Carey
, Kathleen: KMGX, 1994; KZLA, KNX, 1994-98. Kathleen works at WTKR/TV-Norfolk, Virginia.

CARLIN, George. KDAY. “Before Carlin came along in the late ‘60s, comedy was the ‘Take my wife – please!’ kind of comedy,” said Bill Maher, in the year-end issue of Entertainment Weekly. “Carlin was one of the guys who said, ‘No, we’re going to take comedy out of the Catskills and we’re going to make it urban-based. We’re going to make it hip. We’re going to make it something that you don’t necessarily want to listen to with your kids.’”

“He was the only person I ever heard who talked about religion in the way that I thought about religion,” continued Maher. “Comedians have always made jokes about religion, but they weren’t subversive. But he said that religion was stupid and dangerous. And that was very powerful to me, that someone could say that publicly.”

When Charlie Rose reviewed those who had died in 2008 for his PBS show, he aired Carlin’s description of stand-up from a past appearance. “Stand-up is the only art form where the intended receiver of the art is present at the delivery and the art form can be altered according to their appreciation of it as you go. The audience gave me signals that gave me license to do more with my body, my face and my voice.”

When he was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Carlin requested his star be placed in front of the studios of KDAY, where he did a short stint teamed with Jack Burns as “The Wright Brothers” morning show. George died June 22, 2008, at the age of 71.

Carlisle, Dan: KWST, KROQ, 1979; KLOS, 1981-83 and 2004-05. Dan was part of the original group of Creem magazine in Detroit. He worked swing at KLOS until the end of 2005. Dan could be heard on weekends at 103.7 in San Francisco while it was Classic Hits until a format flip to Oldies in late spring of 2011.

CARLSON, Bill: KFAC, 1953-83. Born April 2, 1919, he grew up in Plum City, Wisconsin. While earning a journalism degree from the University of Wisconsin, he started his radio career at the campus station. After graduation he went to KMBC-Kansas City. World War II took five years of his life but he returned to the states speaking three languages, which contributed mightily to his hiring at KFAC because he could pronounce the composers and music titles flawlessly.

David Bernhart of Burbank remembered Bill Carlson. "In the mid-'50s, my late mother and Mr. Carlson began a pen-pal correspondence based on her interest in the Unity faith and his side duty on KFAC as voice of ‘The Unity Viewpoint.’ Then, on a couple of occasions in the late '60s, Mr. Carlson arranged for my mom, my sister and me to visit the station's Prudential Square studios. Though I was no more than ten and my sister no more than seven, we were ushered right into the booth to sit next to Mr. Carlson and watch him broadcast. And, as was almost bound to happen, I inadvertently said something while the mike was open. Rather than instantly throwing us all out into the parking lot, however, Mr. Carlson was as gracious as he could be and left it to my mother to chew me out in the car on the way home! In the decades since, it's become a source of pride for me to think that, thanks to Mr. Carlson, a ten-year-old boy's unintelligible yammering in the background is a moment probably unique in KFAC history. I will remember Bill Carlson always."

Bill died of cancer on December 15, 1999, at the age of 80.

Carlson, Doug: KFWB, 1970-71. After 39 years in Honolulu, where he reported for tv and newspaper outlets, he did corporate communications and congressional press secretary work and hosted a drive-time show on Hawaii Public Radio, Doug moved to Sacramento in 2012 and now is an information officer with the California Department of Water Resources.
Carlton, Russ: KMGG, 1984; KFI, 1984-85. Russ died November 5, 1985, of a brain tumor at the age of 38.

 

(Carey Curelop, Frank Chambers, Francesca Cappucci, and Chet Casselman)

Carlucci, Mike: KFI, 1984; KIKF, 1985-88 and 1992-93; KYSR, 1993-96; KBIG, 1996-98; KFWB, 1999-2002; KXTA, 2002-05. Mike was the P.A. announcer at Dodger Stadium for many years.
Carmody, Lyle: KMPC. Lyle was part of the news teams who experimented with doing traffic reporter from a motorcycle.
Carnegie, Jack: KKDJ, 1972. Unknown.
Carolla, Adam: KROQ, 1995-2005; KLSX, 2006-09. Adam replaced Howard Stern at KLSX on January 3, 2006 and left the FM Talk Station 2.20.09 with a format flip to AMP RADIO. He pioneered a new era of podcasting. His podcast boasts 350,000 downloads daily. Adam appeared on the 2012 edition of Celebrity Apprentice.
Carpenter, Craig: KEZY, 1977-81; KROQ, 1981-82; KNX/fm, 1983; KKHR, 1983-86; KMET, 1986; KEZY, 1987-88; KXMX, 1999-2000; KLAA, 2008. Craig hosts Friday Lunch Box Radio Show on 101.5FM KOCI/Newport Beach.
Carpenter, Scott: KLAC, 1984-87. Scott lives in Washington, DC and does voiceover work.
Carpenter, Scott: KNX/fm; KABC, 1988-89. Scott lives in Portland and is a stock broker.
Carper, Carol: KGFJ, 1978-84. Carol is editor of Urban Network Magazine.
Carr, Firpo: KTLK, 2005. The spiritual advisor to Michael Jackson started a weekend talk show at Progressive "K-TALK" in the late spring 2005.

CARRERO, Margaret: KNX, 2012-14.  Carrero joined the KNX news team in March 2012 from KMJ-Fresno.  

She began her radio career at Country music station KRAK in Sacramento. A few years later she transitioned to traffic reporting with Metro Networks / Westwood One. For the better part of her 15 years with Metro, Margaret produced content and traffic reports in the Sacramento / San Joaquin Valley region and delivered countless reports for just about every radio format from Chico to Merced.  She transferred to metro’s Fresno office in 2006 where she wrote news for the company’s wire service, while continuing to do traffic reports on radio and television.  In 2008, Margaret joined the KMJ news team in Fresno. 

Many of Margaret’s stories have aired on the CBS Radio network over the years.

Carroll, Bill: KFI, 2010-14. Bill, a Canadian, began a noon show at KFI on 2.22.10.

(J Cruz, "Papa Joe" Chevalier, Tom Calococci; and Brad "Martini" Chambers)

Carroll, Larry: KJLH, 1970-71; KIIS, 1971-72; XPRS, 1972; KFWB, 2001-08. Larry worked as an anchor at all-News KFWB until the fall of 2008 when the company went through downsizing.

CARROLL, Rick: KKDJ, 1973-75, pd; KEZY, 1975-78; KROQ, 1978-85, pd; KEZY, 1986-88, pd; KROQ, 1988-89. At age 14, Rick hitchhiked to KLIV-San Jose after school to hang out. By 1970 he was the pd of two San Francisco stations.

His significant contribution to Los Angeles radio is that during the 1980s and 1990s, he was associated with the success of "New Music" radio. Rick was described in the LA Times as "a stocky, intense man with a wild growth of hair." At KROQ, he ran a station that had for years been beset by a myriad of legal and financial problems. KROQ had actually gone "dark" to try to straighten out its entanglements. Some called it the flagship station of "madhouse rock." At one point the debt-ridden station used room 1228 of the Pasadena Hilton as its studio. Rick said, "We've created the illusion that the station is non-structured. Actually, it's probably the tightest programmed format in the country, where the pd chooses all the songs by hand."

In 1983, as a "New Music" consultant, he worked with MTV. His company, Carroll Schwartz & Groves, scored the film Surf II, but the company was neither as glamorous nor as lucrative as Rick had imagined, and he returned to KROQ, launching the "Rock of the '80s" format.

In 1983, when KROQ's ratings dipped while KIIS began its strong ascent, the LA Times asked, "Has the fabled 'Rock of the '80s' already bitten the dust?" When he started, KROQ was the only station playing "New Wave" music. When Rick instituted some structure to the format and music selection, the jocks picketed and advertisers pulled out, resulting in a compromise. He described the new rock listener: "A KROQ listener may be carrying a skateboard or a briefcase."

Rick was plagued by a troubled personal life. He made two attempts at rehabilitation for a drug problem. Rick died on July 10, 1989, of complications of pneumonia at the age of 42. KROQ personality Richard Blade gave this on-air testimonial: "I've lost a friend. In fact, everyone lost a friend who loves music. You might not have known his name, but you surely felt his influence." In R&R's 1993 special edition of "Twenty Years of Excellence," Rick was cited as a "pioneer." Rick's contribution was noted thusly, "His balance of carefully researched music and anarchic on-air attitude has built a heritage any station would envy."

Carroll, Roger: KABC, 1948-58; KMPC, 1959-79. Roger is in semi-retirement and developing entertainment related projects.
Carroll, Tom: KPPC, 1964-65. Tom went on to work at KTMS-Santa Barbara in the late 1980s. He passed away at age 69 in 1999 from a heart attack.
Carruthers, Mike: KPSA/KLVE, 1972-75; KIQQ, 1979-80; KHTZ, 1981-85; KBIG, 1987-93. Mike is head of affiliate relations for Black Card Radio.
Carson, Deb: KFI, 2006-07; KLAC, 2010-12. Deb is heard providing sports updates at Fox Sports Radio, heard locally at KLAC.
Carson, Jim: KBLA, 1965-67; KBBQ, 1967; KIIS, 1973; KHJ, 1973, KIQQ, 1973-89; KEDG/KLIT, 1989-94; KRTH, 1994-2014. Jim works middays at "K-Earth."
Carson, Karen: KOST, 2009-11. Karen joined middays at KOST in the spring of 2009. She left in early 2011 and joined "Fresh" format in New York.

CARTER, "Big John": KEZY, 1969; KHJ, 1975; KEZY, 1976-79; KHJ, 1984-86. Johnny died August 24, 2005, following a long illness. He was 58. John was a veteran of KEZY and KHJ.

Born Johnny Yount, the Bill Wade School of Broadcasting graduate was known as "Spanky Elliott" at KACY-Oxnard and KEZY in the late 1960s. He got started at KNAK-Salt Lake City. Johnny's response to a request to track his career for Los Angeles Radio People resulted in a three-page letter. The following excerpts reflect on some of his stops: "1967: Ogden 1st Phone was the only thing I ever did that amounted to anything. 1967, KSTN: first crack at mornings. 1969, KEZY: Replaced, or more correctly, succeeded Emperor Hudson for a month. Too young! 1969, KYNO: My call to the Big Time. Named 'Big John Carter' over the phone by programming genius Bill Watson.

1970-71, KGB: Charlie Van Dyke hired me and was the reason I got the big jobs. If it weren't for him, no one would have ever heard of me. I quit unceremoniously when some of my friends got fired. My heroism got me nothing but a lot of bad press. 1972, KCBQ: Jack McCoy was talked into hiring me by some well-intentioned but foolish friends. I screwed up mornings for a couple of months. Jack was always nice to me. I can't imagine what I was thinking.  

1972, KFIG: My one and only turn at bat at FM “underground.” Lasted a month. 1973, KCPX-SLC: It was the one and only time I got a woman in trouble. Some sort of chastity record for a dj. 1974, KPOI: Hired to do mornings as Maxx Mahimahi, and I victimized the Islands with the notorious election day gag of 1974. I got fired for my trouble. 1975, KHJ: Charlie hired me again. After some months I began to feel extremely unwelcome and bailed. 1976, Eugene: I thought I'd try the small time, and I hated it. I hung around a few months and managed to meet the woman I married, a wonderful gal who nearly killed me a few years later. If she calls, I'm not in. 1976, KEZY: No boss was ever more of a radio person than Rick Carroll, God bless him. 1984 to 1986, KHJ "CAR RADIO." It was like going to a funeral every day." 1986-present: I'm on the beach. I have the distinct misfortune of sounding like and looking like Rush Limbaugh."  

He had been in critical care with an infection in his brain.

   

(Fred Crane, Chuck Cotton, Myles Cameron, and Mike Callaghan)

Carter, Chris: KLYY, 1997-99; KACD, 2000; KLSX, 2001-06; KLOS, 2006-12. Chris hosts America's longest running Beatles show, Breakfast with the Beatles on KLOS.
Carter, Christy: KROQ, 1996-2001; KMXN, 2002; KSPA, 2002. Christy works middays at Pop Standards KSPA-Inland Empire.
Carter, John: KMPC, KYSR; KCBS; KLIT, 1989-94; KFWB. Born John Carter Forshee in La Crosse, Wisconsin, and raised in Irvington, Texas, he lived in Burbank for the past 11 years. He spent 10 years in Dallas radio including KFJZ and six years in Houston. In 1989 he started with Unistar and in 1992 joined Shadow Broadcast services. John had various assignments including "Arrow 93" weekend sports anchor, KRLA news and traffic announcer and all-night KFWB traffic. John died of cancer on December 17, 1999. He was 52 and left a 22-year-old son.

CARTER, Les: KBCA, 1963-67; KPPC, 1968-71. KPPC/fm 106.7 in Pasadena only broadcast all day Sundays and on Wednesday evenings, sometimes broadcasting church services and sometimes as an fm simulcast. KPPC was the first FM ROCK radio station in Southern California beginning in November of 1967 (at midnight on Halloween with KBCA jazz deejay Les Carter moonlighting as "Sleepy Gross"). The stations' broadcast studios were in the basement of the Pasadena Presbyterian Church (the PPC in the call letters). It was known as "Underground Radio" (in spirit as well as in location). By April 1970, KPPC/fm had moved into new broadcast studios at 99 South Chester Avenue near futuristic Cal Tech with a state-of-the-art sound board custom designed by creative engineers Matt Rubin and Mike Callaghan. On April Fools Day 1970, Les began the eighteen amazing months of KPPC consciousness that would come to a sudden end "Sunday, Bloody Sunday" on October 24, 1971. Les, as pd, brought many amazing personalities to the airwaves at KPPC during 1970 and 1971 including: The Obscene Steven Clean (Steven Segal, nasty hip riffer); Dr. Demento (Barry Hansen, naughty roots musicologist); "The Incredible" Credibility Gap satirical news team extraordinaire featuring Richard Beebe (news voice extraordinaire), David L. Lander (played Squiggy on Laverne & Shirley), Michael McKean, and Harry Shearer (everything showbiz political satirist); Don Hall (film music producer); Mississippi Fats (Joe Rogers; Miss Outrageous Nevada (Susan Carter, wife of Les); Inor (Ron Middag, audio producer); and Johnny Otis (Blue Monday r&b pioneer).

An early version of the current National Public Radio hour "Le Show" hosted by the many voices of Harry Shearer was broadcast on KPPC in 1970 and 1971 called "Destination Music". The Persuasions added soul to the station sound with their A Capella KPPC IDs and promos. Deirdre O'Donoghue (humanitarian and Beatles host) started the KPPC Community Switchboard that gave out information on health issues and other data that hippies needed to know to survive. Les passed away August 26, 1996. (written by the late Ted Alvy)

Carter, Nick: KGBS, 1964. Nick hosted a jazz show on KGBS.
Cartter, Rich: KTBT, 1969; KUCI, 1969-73; KYMS, 1973-74. Rich was working at KBOX-Lompoc.
Caruso, Maryann: KLSX, 1997-98. Maryann is a public relations consultant in New York, working for Americas at Deutsche Bank.
Carver, Steve: CBS/LA, 2010-13. In late summer 2010, Steve became cluster market manager for CBS/LA. He left in late summer of 2013 for the CBS cluster job in Tampa.
Caryl, Joni: KHJ, 1984; KMGG, 1984-86; KBZT/KLSX, 1986; KNX/fm, 1987-88; KRTH, 1994-2002; KKJZ, 2003-07. Joni started in morning drive at the all-Jazz station, KKJZ, in late 2003 and left in the spring of 2007 following a management change.
Case, Dwight: KHJ, 1972-81. Dwight is president of Motivational Incentives Group.
Casey, Steve: KHJ, 1977-79. Steve consults radio stations in over 40 countries.

     

(Mimi Chen, Peter Cashman, and Paul Crouch)

Casey, Tom: KZLA, 1980-83. Tom owns Research Partnership in Sunnyvale.
Cashman, Peter: KLON, 1984-86. For many years before arriving at KLON, Peter worked in Australia radio. After leaving KLON, Peter worked at Casden Cable Company as the director of operations, sales, and marketing in Beverly Hills.
Cassandra: KROQ, 1983. Cassandra Peterson acts as the "Mistress of the Night."
Casselman, Chet: KMPC, 1957-60. Chet is retired and living in San Francisco. He is the founder and president of the Broadcast Legends of the Bay Area.
Cassidy, Paul: KFWB, 1968-71; KHJ, 1971-72; KLOS, 1972; KGBS/KTNQ, 1974-79; KWST, 1979-81. Since 1995, Paul has been president of Cordillera Communications headquartered in Plano, Texas. Cordillera is a group of 12 tv stations, primarily in the Western US., and represents 4 different networks.
Cassidy, Thomas: KFAC, 1947-87. Thomas spent four decades with KFAC, the Classical music radio station, as an announcer and left in 1987. He died November 6, 2012, at the age of 95. "Luncheon at the Music Center" debuted in March of 1965 hosted by Thomas until 1976 and the arrival of new host Martin Workman. Thomas also hosted the "Evening Concert" series sponsored by the Southern California Gas Company. A book on his life is nearing publication.
Castner, Michael: KFI, 2004-06. Michael hosted a radio show for The Wall Street Journal. He now is a talk radio host at KEX-Portland.
Castro, Daniel: KPCC, 1984-2000. As Sancho, Daniel hosted an eclectic weekend show until the Minnesota Public Radio Corporation took over KPCC and eliminated music in early 2000.
Cat, The: KNAC. The Cat lives in Bakersfield.
Cate, Ira D.: KMPC, 1955-60. Unknown.
Catena, Mike: KGOE, 1973-76. Mike worked at KCRW under the name Mike McKay. He owns an executive search firm in Phoenix.
Cates, Tim: XTRA/KLAC, 1997-2012. Tim started as intern and worked his way up to producer and co-host with Tony Bruno. Tim continues as Bruno's executive producer. The show is syndicated by Fox Sports Radio, heard in L.A. on KLAC. Technically Tim works for Directv Sports Group (the same company that owns Dan Patrick Show) as they own and operate the Tony Bruno Show. Tim also does traffic on the weekends for KFI
Catron, Bob: KFI, 1960s; KROQ, 1972. Bob was sports director at KFI. Unknown.

CECIL, Chuck: KFI, 1952-73; KGIL, 1973-86; KPRZ, 1986-88; KPCC, 1988-2000; KCSN, 2000-02; KLON/KKJZ, 2002-12. Born in 1923, Chuck grew up on a farm in Enid, Oklahoma playing 78 rpm records after school and doing daily chores. When he was 12, catastrophic dust storms sent many thousands of Midwesterners fleeing from their homes and farms. His family migrated to California. "We came out to California in a 1935 Chevrolet with a trailer behind and a mattress on top," he said. They landed in Los Angeles, where his three older sisters were working as actresses in films.

Chuck listened to some of the early Southern California radio personalities like Al Jarvis, while he was taking radio courses at Los Angeles City College. His first radio job was on KVEC-San Luis Obispo. He joined the Navy for three years, and when he was discharged as a carrier pilot, he enrolled in what was then the Broadcast Network School. One of his classmates was Dick Whittinghill who had just left the singing group, the Pied Pipers.

Following school, he got radio jobs in Klamath Falls, Oregon and Stockton before landing at KFI in 1956. It was at KFI that his syndicated series, "The Swingin' Years," was developed. At first it only aired for three hours on Saturday mornings. It evolved into a Saturday "Party Time," where his music was played in periods between live remotes of bands from the Ambassador's Coconut Grove, the Palladium and other venues playing Big Bands. The program ran from 1960 to 1968.

Over the years, Chuck has conducted and collected a Who's Who of interviews with band leaders and sidemen. His listeners have helped him out by providing rare records. "The Swingin' Years" continues to be the quintessential program of this musical niche. Chuck sends out more than 100 hours of taped shows to some 30 stations across the United States. He's also heard on the Armed Forces Radio Network.

 In the early 1990s, he rerecorded more than 2,000 hours of Big Band programs, because the old tapes were deteriorating. He has a library of 50,000 records and more than 300 interviews with greats like Louis Armstrong, Woody Herman and Benny Goodman. In the summer of 2012, at the age of 89, he received an Award of Appreciation from the NAB.

Asked if he planned a full retirement, he said, "No, I'll be on the air as long as someone is listening.”

Cervantez, Terry: KOST, 1999. Terry is working in Palm Springs.
Chachi: KBIG, 2000-09. Dave "Chachi" Denes was made program director of KBIG in early 2004. He left KBIG (now MY/fm) in early 2009 following a company downsizing and is now an executive with BenzTown.

       

(Firpo Carr, Tom Cross, Kaci Christian, and Anna [Ginger] Chan)

Chaidez, Zeke: KDAY, 2009-11. Zeke was appointed pd/gm at the Urban Hip-Hop station in the fall of 2009.
Chase
, Eric: KIQQ, 1974-75; KHJ, 1975, KFI, 1975-81; KRTH, 2003. Eric worked swing at the Oldies station. 
Chambers, Brad: KLAC, 2002-05; XTRA, 2005-06. Brad left his post as pd at the Adult Standards station, Fabulous 690, when Spanish owners took over in 2006 and changed format. He owns MartiniInTheMorning.com.
Chambers, Frank: KTBT, 1969. Frank (Don Kirk) worked at KTBT, billed as the first Acid Rock station in Garden Grove. Other LARP at the time included Brent Kahlen, Larry Adams and Jim Foss. he works in radio and tv in
both radio & television in both Redding, CA and Medford, OR. "I'm also International Media Manager for Phoenix Voyage Humanitarian Initiative."
Chambers
, George: KUSC, 1971-74; KLVE, 1974; KABC, 1976-78. George owns KXIT-Dalhart, Texas.
Chambers, Lee: KWIZ, 1990-91; KEZY, 1991-92; KLAC, 1991-93; KYSR, 1992-98; KABC/KLOS/KSPN/KDIS, 2002-05. Lee is the multimedia services manager for the four ABC O&Os. He also works weekends at Oldies KOLA in the Inland Empire.
Champagne, Robert: KEZY/KXMX, 1999-2000. Robert did all-nights at KXMX, "Mix 95.9" until an ownership and format change in 2000. He's now working overnights and promotions as Corey Roberts at XHCR-San Diego.
Chan, Anna: KLIT, 1997. Anna is working weekends at KOLA. As Ginger Chan, she broadcasts traffic on various stations and the morning show at KTLA/Channel 5.
Chance, Jonathan: KABC, 1994-2000; KFWB, 2000-02. Jonathan is a field reporter for KFWB and KGO-San Francisco.
Chandler, Ben: KMPC, 1958-62. Ben has passed away.
Chandler, Bob: The former sports broadcaster died in January 1995.

CHANDLER, Bruce: KEZY, 1973-76; KIQQ, 1976-85. KRTH, 1985-86 and 1996-98 and 2002-14. Beginning in 1988, Bruce worked mornings at the Oldies channel at Dial-Global (formerly Westwood One). He left Dial-Global in late Spring 2012. He worked weekends at KRTH until September 2014.

Born in Englewood, New Jersey, Bruce moved with his family to Southern California when he was 7. He was given his first transistor radio in the early 1960s. "I think the fact I could take the radio station with me was important. KFXM was the station that influenced me in my early teens and then on March 10, 1962, KMEN went Rock and now the Inland Empire had two stations. I listened to Lyle Kilgore doing weekend news at KFXM and said, 'I want to do that.’" And he did.

Bruce started on KMEN in 1967 doing weekend news and then a year later he was a weekend jock. By October 1970, he was working the evening shift. A year later he crossed town to work afternoon drive on KFXM. "It was the first time someone went from KMEN to KFXM."

At KIQQ he did mornings with Tony St. James for five years. In the late 1970s, he moonlighted on KWOW-Pomona as Jeff Robins and syndicated a show for many years called, "Romancing the Oldies." In 1982, Bruce started a voiceover career that has continued with successful campaigns. He was the voice for the Fox/TV show, Front Page, and did the 1994 national Mazda campaign.

"I spent a few months at KRTH. I'll never forget, I got blown out the same day as the space shuttle blew up and in another way my career in local radio blew up." He has also narrated quite a few E! True Hollywood Stories, including episodes on Frank Sinatra, John Denver, Wayne Newton, The Monkees, Facts of Life Girls, Robert Downey Jr. and many more. He returned to KRTH in June of 2001 for part-time fill-in duties, where he continues.

Chandler, Ed: KMGG, 1983-1984. Last heard, Ed was working radio in Texas.
Chandler, Len: KRLA, 1968. The former resident songwriter-musician for the "Credibility Gap," is active in music circles.
Chaney, David: KMET, 1979; KLOS, 1979-81; KEZY, 1981; KNX/fm, 1983; KMET, 1985. David lives in the mountains near Lake Tahoe where he writes articles for outdoor sports publications. Would he return to the Southland? "Nope, I was anxious to get out. I loved the creative buzz, but I just didn't have the temperament. I'm where I belong, in the mountains."
Chanley, Andy: KLYY, 1997-99; KACD, 1999-2000; KSWD, 2008-14. Andy works at 100.3/fm The Sound.

   

(Michael Clarke,Trent Cobbs, Don Cox, and Tom Crann)

Chapman, Alan: KUSC, 1996-2014. Alan works at Classical KUSC.
Chappe, Jeanne: KNAC, 1974-75; KROQ, 1977-78; KGAB, 1979-80; KBBQ, 1981-83. Jeanne married LARP Zack Zenore and they lived in New Mexico. She has passed away.
Chappel, Bill: KGFJ, 1975-84; KJLH, 1984. Bill left radio for the world of computers.
CHARLES
, Chris: KBLA, 1965; KGBS, 1969-70. SEE The Magic Christian
Charles
, Jared: KCSN, 1990-97. The former pd at KCSN is now a licensed psychologist. In addition to working privately with individuals, couples and families, he works in nursing homes and assisted living facilities.  "I must say that my radio career was great in its day, but I now feel like I'm playing a much more meaningful role."
Chase: KLYY, 1997-99. Chase was working at "Y107" until early 1999.
Chase, Eric: KIQQ, 1974-75; KHJ, 1975; KFI, 1975-81; KRTH, 2003. Eric briefly worked swing at "K-Earth" during the summer of 2003. He does weekend shifts at KKRW in Houston and KZEP in San Antonio. Eric also does some Premium Choice voice tracking for Clear Channel. "I spend most of my time recording audio books these days,  plus the odd commercial.  My big news however, is that in 2012 I was inducted into the Texas Radio Hall of Fame (as Paul  Christy). I guess I really have been gone from LA too long, eh?"
Chastain, Jane: KBRT; KLTX, 1999-2000. Jane worked afternoon drive on Catholic KLTX.
Chatteron, Larry: KHJ, 1964-65; KFI, 1970s. Unknown.
Chavez, Julia: KFWB, 1980-86. Julia is with MetroNetworks in Las Vegas. On the weekends, she anchors the news for the Talk America Network.
Checkman, Chris: KXLU, 1988-2005. Chris hosts Blues Hotel, each Wednesday night at midnight.
Chen, Mimi: KSCA, 1994-97; KCSN, 2005-07; KSWD, 2009-14. Mimi works weekends at 100.3fm/The Sound.

CHENAULT, Gene. Gene was one-half of the iconic radio programming name Drake-Chenault Enterprises. He died February 23, 2010. Gene was 90.

Woody Goulart shares some memories of working with Gene. “Few people in real life get to meet actual heroes. But, I am one of the fortunate ones. I met Gene in Hollywood in 1973 under very tense circumstances. When Drake and Chenault came in to KIQQ [K-100/fm], everyone at that station was fired except for the bookkeeper and me. Eventually, I, too, heard the famous words nobody wants to hear. But, I remember being treated with courtesy and respect in my termination, even though to the Drake-Chenault people, I was “an outsider.” Gene Chenault personally ensured that I got severance pay. I share this memory today to dispel a decades-long prevailing myth that the Drake-Chenault people were ruthless and heavy-handed. 

“Gene Chenault will best be remembered for leading a broadcasting business revolution.  Of course, the legendary success in Los Angeles of 93/KHJ Boss Radio starting in 1965 is unforgettable. But, Chenault was one of the first broadcasters who believed that fm radio should become the rightful home of popular music programming in the United States. Starting in the 1970s, his company’s national radio programming consultancy boosted fm radio outlets in major markets to prominence, most notably in New York City on WOR/fm. Later, iconic Drake-Chenault syndicated radio formats such as Hit Parade, Solid Gold, Great American Country, and other brands enabled smaller market stations to attain high standards in music programming that otherwise would not have been affordable.”

Chenevey, Jim: KKHR/KNX/fm, 1984-88. Jim has worked at CBS radio news network in New York for over a quarter of century.

(Tim Cates, Joe Cala, John Clark, and Deb Carson)

CHERRY, Hugh: KFOX, 1960-68; KGBS, 1968-73; XPRS, 1974-75; KLAC, 1976. Born in 1922, Hugh's first radio job was WKAY-Glasgow, Kentucky, in 1946 for $40 a week. His first break came when he started in Nashville on WKDA. While still in the Midwest, he appeared on ABC/TV's Bourbon Street Beat in 1959. He was a longtime performer on NBC/TV's Midwest Hayride. Hugh was voted the #3 most popular country dj as published in Billboard in 1967.

When KGBS changed from Country to Hot 100 in October 1968, Hugh moved from dj to the news department, and then to all-nights. In 1970, he co-wrote and narrated a 36-hour documentary on the history of country music. Out of the Bill Wade studios, Hugh daily taped for XPRS a Country program, which was trucked to Tijuana for airing. When his daily on-air career ended, he became a college instructor and lecturer on country music. His is the voice on Johnny Cash's album, Folsom Prison. In 1977, Hugh joined R&R as the Country editor and, in the same year, was elected to the Country Music Disc Jockey Hall of Fame. During the 1980s, Hugh wrote and narrated many country radio specials, including "Country Report Countdown." He penned over 300 album liner notes. The avid bicyclist said in an R&R interview that survival was his greatest achievement. In 1996 he moved to Nashville.

Hugh died October 22, 1998, at the age of 76. 

Cherry, Marvin: KBCA, 1976-78. Unknown.
Chester, Lloyd: KFWB, 1968-69. Lloyd teamed with Jerry London in the 1970s to publish an entertainment magazine in Palm Springs. 
Chester the Arrester: KIIS, 1987-2006; KLIT, 1997-98. Chet Hearring worked at Dees Entertainment until early 2009.
Chevalier, "Papa Joe": KMPC, 2000. Armand "Papa Joe" Chevalier, a sports talk show host at KMPC, 1540/The Ticket, died June 3, 2011, from complications of a stroke. He was 62. Papa Joe, popular for expressing views that largely represented the average sports fan, suffered a stroke in late March that resulted in paralysis to his right side. His speech and cognitive processes were not affected. "You know how people say I've fallen and I can't get up? Well, I've fallen and I can't get up," Chevalier said April 7. He had been working in Las Vegas and the Sporting News Radio Network until 2005.
Chiang, Johnny: KNX, 1989-91; KFI, 1991-93; KOST, 1994-2000. Johnny is program director for the Cox cluster in Houston. in 2014, Johnny was inducted into the Texas Hall of Fame.
Childs, Kevin: KSRF, 1972-73; KLVE, 1973-75. Since leaving Southern California radio, Kevin served as the original pd at KWOD-Sacramento in the late 70's. He formed a business audio recording company known as Audio Service America. ASA was the original company that provided stylized marketing on-hold messages to the nation....combining messages with music. In 2001, prior to his semi-retirement in 2006, he became the station manager at KRCK in Palm Desert. Even though he is "retired," he still spends more than 50 hours each week running his audio company. For the past 15 years, he has been the telephone voice of Pioneer Electronics customer support. He lives in Albany, New York. 

     

(Jeanne Chappe, Chester the Arrester, and Jonathan Chance)

Childs, Randy: KLSX, 1988. Randy works for Mediabase Music Research division of Premiere Radio Networks.
Chin, Julie: KNX, 2006-14. Julie started as news director in early summer of 2006 from KGO-San Francisco.
Chiotakis, Seve, KCRW, 2012. Steve joined the Santa Monica station in early 2012 from the American Public Media's Marketplace Morning Report. He got his start in public media at WBHM-Birmingham.
Chlowitz, Allan: KNX/fm, 1972; KHJ, 1973; KRTH, 1974-85; KTWV, 1987-92; KRLA/KLSX, 1993-95. Allan lives in Palm Desert.
Choc, Mr.: KPWR, 1997-2005. Mr. Choc works the all-night shift at "Power 106."
Chodroff, Amy: KFWB, 1999-2000. Amy is living in Florida.
Christensen, Ken: KFI/KOST/KACE, 1992-95; KYSR/KXEZ/KIBB, 1995-2000; KFI/KOST/KYSR, 1999-2000; KXTA/KLAC/KFI, 2000-01. Ken left his post as head of Hispanic Broadcasting Corporation/LA in early 2003.
Christensen, Todd: KMPC, 1992. The former Raider tight end heads the Athletes for Youth Foundation.
Christian, Kaci: KFI, 2001-02. Kaci was working on-air for a Bakersfield tv station. 

CHRISTIAN, Magic: KBLA, 1965; KGBS, 1969-70. Chris Charles was the original ‘Magic Christian.” He passed away July 2, 2010 from cancer. He had been living in a boarding house in Iowa. He was 66. In the 1960s, Chuck worked as a Top 40 jock at KBLA and KGBS. He was born in Chicago and his family moved to the Southland when he was 13. “When I got to L.A. I listened to Bill Ballance on KFWB in the early 1960s and I wanted to be like him in every way,” Chris said when being interviewed for Los Angles Radio People.  When he was 14 he called every station in the phone book and KDWC in West Covina invited him to the station. “I got a weekly shift playing Arthur Lyman music and my mom had to take me to work and pick me up after my shift.” At 17 he began his career at KLAS-Las Vegas. “I was on my way! I was blessed with great pipes, good looks, a great sense of humor, gallons of testosterone and made big money playing poker.” His next stop was KUTY-Palmdale. “I got my first taste of concert promotion. The Beach Boys came up for a four-hour show for $500. I got the rest of the money.” Chris went on to work at KMEN-San Bernardino as Chuck Christensen, WCFL-Chicago, KYNO-Fresno, WMEX-Boston (he replaced Larry Lujack who was on his way to Chicago), KTAR-Phoenix and KCBQ-San Diego.

At KYNO, the md was Al Casey. “I married Al’s ex-wife and adopted his daughter. She works as Kelli Casey in Houston radio and I’m very proud of her.” Influenced by his experience with the Beach Boys concert, Chris did rock concerts, “happenings” and hootenannies. “I had briefcases full of sock-hop money...wrinkled 1, 5, 10 and 20-dollar bills.” In the early 1970s “The Magic Christian” moved to Canada and worked at two Rock stations. “I was paid the same as Prime Minister Trudeau.” At one of the Toronto stations, Rick Moranis was his board-op. Chris went on to working mornings at the Country format from the Jones Satellite operation out of Colorado. “Thirty years ago, Helen Gurley Brown looked me in the eyes and said, ‘You should write a book!’ If I ever get the time, I will. Folks have told me that if I did write one, it would make Howard Stern’s book and movie look like a warm-up act. I’ve been truly blessed all my life.”

Christian, Mark: KYMS, 1983-88; KPZE/KEZY, 1988-90; KKLA/KFSH, 2000-03; KWVE, 2003-05, KLAA, 2008. Mark is producer/technical director and on-air co-host of Wine Country Talk Radio on KLAA. He's also the engineer for the Academy of Radio & TV in Huntington Beach.

(Katie Clark, Rich Capparela, Frank Cody, and Marvin Collins)

CHRISTIAN, Roger: KRLA, 1960; KFWB, 1961-65; KBLA, 1965; KHJ, 1965-67; KBLA, 1967; KFWB, 1967-68; KGBS, 1969-71; KDAY, 1971; XPRS, 1971-72; KIQQ, 1973-74; KRTH, 1974-75; XPRS, 1978-79; KRLA, 1983-84; XPRS, 1985-86. There was a gentleness to Roger Christian that conveyed to his listeners an instant ease and a sense of warmth. Some thought he was aloof, but it was his busy schedule that kept him juggling ideas, thoughts and creativity. More often than not, he showed up for his shift after his first record had already been started.

Rochester, New York was where Roger started his radio career on WSAY. He worked as Mike Melody for a couple of years in Buffalo. His inspiration was Guy King on WWOL-Buffalo. Guy was actually Tom Clay.

During the summer of 1960, Roger started the noon-to-three shift at KRLA. In 1961 he worked the all-night slot as part of the strike breakers at KFWB. Roger was always active in music. In 1964 his Beatles Story album was in the top three on the charts and earned a Gold record in sales. He was one of the original KHJ "Boss Jocks" during the format's debut in April 1965, working the nine-to-noon slot.

Roger returned to KFWB and was on the air when the station went all-News in March of 1968. Someone who was present on the last day of KFWB saw Roger "in tears."

He was one of the original jocks (noon-3) when "K-100 FM" debuted. He wrote many of the surf songs popularized in the '60s by the Beach Boys and Jan and Dean. Many called him the Cole Porter of the teens. He wrote Dead Man's Curve and Little Old Lady From Pasadena. During one particular week while on KFWB, songs that Roger had written were #6, #7 and #8. Because of the payola scandals of the late 1950s and early 1960s, he couldn't play any of his songs until they hit the Top 5. Roger appeared in 17 movies, including The Carpetbaggers. In 1975, Roger and Jim Pewter launched Rock Shoppe with the 6-hour radio special, "The Beach Years." He was also a music consultant to the movie industry and in 1975 worked on Return to Macon County. He produced a Denver group called the Moonrakers that eventually became Sugarloaf.

At his funeral in June 1991, Roger's brother told KRLA historian, Bill Earl, that Roger had committed suicide. Roger's show close seems somehow prophetic: "That's all she wrote - sleep warm - later, lover."

Christopher, Brian: KIBB, 1997. Unknown.
Christopher, Jimmy "the Saint": KNAC, 1978-87. Jimmy works for KRLD AM & FM in Dallas.
Christopher, Mark: SEE Joe Daniels
Christy, Bill: KRTH, 1982. Unknown.
Christy, Bob: KMLT: 2006-07. Bob was the general manager at the Amaturo trimulcast stations until 2007.

CHU-LIN, Sam: KFWB, 60s. Sam, one of the first Asian Americans appearing on network television, had been reporter since the 1960s, working for KFWB, KTLA/Channel 5 and since 1995, KTTV. He worked for CBS in the 1970s.

Chu Lin's Asian heritage was important to him, calling journalism "a chance to use your roots for a positive purpose." Chu Lin once persuaded ABC's Nightline to produce a program titled "Asian American - When Your Neighbor Looks Like the Enemy" and helped booked guests and find historical footage. He also won a National Headliner Award for the television documentary "Chu Lin is an Old American Name."

Chulo, Bobby: KPWR, 1999. Bobby hosted a weekend show at "Power 106."
Church III, George: KFWB, KLAC. George was involved in producing in-flight airline programming for Billboard magazine in the mid and late 1970s. He later joined RKO-General in a similar capacity.

   

(Eric Chase, Dwight Case w/wife Virginia, Conway & Steckler, and Alan Colmes)

Ciliano, Paul: KEZY, 1991-92; KLIT, 1992; KYSR, 1992; KTWV, 2011-13. Paul was operations manager at WSB/fm ("B98.5") and WSRV (97.1 The River) in Atlanta until February 2009. He's now music director at KTWV, "the WAVE."

CIPRIANO, Joe: KHTZ, 1980-83; KKHR, 1983-85; KIIS, 1985-90. Joe joined "K-Hits" from WRQX ("Q107")-Washington, DC, where he held down afternoon drive during that station's rise "from #18 to #1 in less than a year." While at KHTZ, he began his voiceover career doing movie trailers for Fast Times At Ridgemont High, Porkys, Revenge of the Nerds and other teen movies. While doing middays at KKHR he was known as Dave Donovan.

From 1995 to 2001 he co-hosted (along with Adrienne Walker) the "World Chart Show," produced by Tom Rounds, heard on over 200 stations around the world.

His on-camera career includes national commercials for Prego Spaghetti Sauce and a co-starring role in NBC’s Knight and Daye.

Today, Joe has a busy voiceover career and is the promo voice of both the Fox, CBS, ESPN International and others. He is the image voice of many radio and tv stations around the country. Joe is also the voice associated with many live television events such as The Emmy Awards, Grammy Awards and more.  In 2012 he received the Don LaFontaine Legacy Award presented by Promax BDA.  The national award was created to honor one individual who exhibits character, longevity, talent, professionalism and the passion for giving back within the broadcast and voice over industry. Joe was also the executive producer of the Primetime Voices for Charity in 2013 as a fundraiser for Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA.  He produced the album, Twas the Night before Christmas and other Classic Children's Stories, the lead single features 31 voice over artists and was played on radio stations all over the country.

Cisco, Frank: KIKF, 1994-98. Frank works in the admissions office at the Academy of Radio and TV/Video Broadcasting in Huntington Beach.
Clapper, Richard: KFOX, 1981; KWIZ, 1982-89; KOLA, 1994-2013. Since 1994, Rick had been working part-time at KOLA in the Inland Empire until late 2013. He is now director of Publications/Graphics & Branding Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona.
Clark, Brian: KLAA, 2007-08. Brian is the chief engineer at 830AM, KLAA.
Clark, Carolyn: KBIG, 1989-95. Unknown.

CLARK, Dick: Dick Clark, his syndicated show heard on KBIG and K-EARTH over the years, died April 18, 2012, at the age of 82 of an apparent heart attack. He was the image of KOST for many years, but he will be remembered most as the longtime tv host and powerhouse producer who changed the way we listened to pop music with American Bandstand, and whose trademark Rockin' Eve became a fixture of New Year's celebrations.

Dick sufffered a serious stroke in 2004 but returned to the airwaves to appear on the New Year’s Eve show.

Born in Mount Vernon, New York on November 30, 1929, Richard Wagstaff Clark began his lifelong career in show business began before he was even out of high school. He started working in the mailroom of WRUN, a radio station in upstate New York run by his father and uncle. It wasn't long before the teenager was on the air, filling in for the weatherman and the announcer, according to a story at ABC News.

Clark pursued his passion at Syracuse University, working as a disc jockey at the student-run radio station while studying for his degree in business. After graduating in 1951, Clark went back to his family's radio station, but within a year, a bigger city and bigger shows were calling.

Clark landed a gig as a dj at WFIL in Philadelphia in 1952, spinning records for a show he called Dick Clark's Caravan of Music. There he broke into the big time, hosting Bandstand, an afternoon dance show for teenagers. Within five years, the whole country was watching. ABC took the show national, and American Bandstand was born.

American Bandstand's formula was simple. Clean-cut boys and girls danced to the hottest hits and the newest singles. In between, Clark chatted with the teens, who helped "rate-a-record," turning songs into sensations. Everyone showed up on American Bandstand: from Elvis Presley to Jerry Lee Lewis, Chuck Berry to Chubby Checker.

When Dick Clark moved to Hollywood in 1963, American Bandstand moved with him. He started Dick Clark Productions, and began cranking out one hit show after another; his name became synonymous with everything from the $25,000 Pyramid to TV's Bloopers & Practical Jokes to the American Music Awards. In 1972, Dick Clark became synonymous with one of the biggest nights of the year.

Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve on ABC became a Dec. 31 tradition, with Clark hosting the festivities for more than three decades, introducing the entertainment acts and, of course, counting down to midnight as the ball dropped in New York's Times Square.

The Museum of Broadcast Communications has done the math, and figures that Dick Clark Productions has turned out more than 7,500 hours of television programming, including more than 30 series and 250 specials, as well as more than 20 movies for theatre and tv. 

Now, America's Oldest Teenager is gone, leaving his indelible mark on generations of fans, and helping change rock 'n' roll and tv forever. His signature sign-off was always "For now, Dick Clark… so long," said with a salute. Today, generations of Americans are saluting back. (Source: ABC News and photo from Getty Images)

Clark, Don: KGIL, 1973-75. Unknown.
Clark, Gary: KNX, 1978-88. Gary, a 10-year veteran of KNX, died August 12, 2000, following a short but painful bout with cancer. Gary was born in Wewoka, Oklahoma and moved to Texas when he was 10. His father was in the oil business. It was in Bryson, Texas, when Gary contracted polio and was paralyzed from the waist down. "Gary overcame the greatest obstacle," said colleague Jim Williams, "and nothing ever slowed him down. He never let his polio bother him." Gary was affectionately known by his friends as "Stix," because of his crutches. His specialized car license plate sported the same word. He covered major fires, floods and riots, working in Santa Barbara radio at KDB and KTMS. He was a stringer at KNX for many years before starting at the CBS station in the late 1970s. Many of his colleagues were shocked when they learned that he was crippled and covered complicated stories on crutches. Gary was retired and living in Tollhouse, just east of Fresno. He was 61.

   

(Lynda Clayton, Craig Carpenter, Ken Christensen, and Dan Carlisle)

Clark, Gloria: KFWB, 1959-63. Gloria died suddenly in 1963 of a cerebral hemorrhage.
Clark, Jay: KRLA/KHTZ, 1988-89; KLSX, 1996-97. Jay was vp of non-music program for Sirius Satellite Radio. Jay is retired and living on his boat in South Florida.
Clark, Jerry: Jerry is a past president of the Greater Los Angeles Press Club and was the executive director of the Southern California Sports Broadcasters.
Clark, John: KBLA, 1967; KNAC, 1972-76; KWST, 1977; KROQ, 1977-1979; KNX, 1988-1991; KFWB, 1999-2000. He was a popular weather personality at KHJ/TV from 1983-1988. John uses his real name, Andrew Amador, and is the host of Best Deals on KTLA/Channel 5.
Clark, Katie: KNX, 2004-08. Katie worked at Dial Global's Bright AC format until late 2008.
Clark, Marcia: KFI. Marcia gained fame as one of the prosecutors in the OJ Simpson trial. She's a high-powered attorney turned book author and correspondent. Her newest novel is Guilt By Degrees.
Clark, Mel: KBIG, 1971-74. Unknown.
Clark, Michael: KFI, 1996-2012; KXTA, 2001-03. Michael is assistant news director at KFI.
Clark, Richard: KBLA, 1966. Richard died in early 1994.
Clark, Steve: KEZY, 1977-79; KUTE, 1981-83; KMPC/fm, 1986; KTWV, 1988-2004; KCBS/Mega, 1998-2002. Steve is currently an executive in the field of venture capital, residing in Beverly Hills.
Clark, Wally: KIIS/KPRZ, 1982-86. Wally is living in Los Angeles and is consulting on various projects.
Claus, Chris: KFWB, 1988-92; KFWB/KTWV, 1992-96. Chris left his gm post at WHPT/WOGL-Philadelphia in the fall of 2000. He is gm at WWWL-New Orleans.

CLAY, Tom: KDAY, 1960-62; KBLA, 1965; KDAY, 1966-67; KGBS, 1971; KPPC, 1971-72; KIQQ, 1973; KWIZ, 1975; KZLA, 1979-80; KPRZ, 1980-85; KMPC, 1988-89. Tom died November 26, 1995, at the age of 66.

Beginning in the 1950s as Guy King in Buffalo, Tom truly has been one of the most interesting personalities in radio. In Detroit he worked for WJBK, CKLW, WWWW, WQTE and WTAK. He was frequently in trouble. In the early 1960s Tom replaced the legendary Alan Freed at KDAY, and announced that Elvis Presley was a close friend and was in town. "I told the audience that I had just spoken to him and he, because of our friendship, agreed to take phone calls from the fans. I gave explicit instructions to the audience not to try to hold him on the phone, so more people could have a chance to talk with him. 'Just say, Hi Elvis. I love you.' I gave out the number of our competitor, KFWB. I thought if I could impress KFWB with how many listeners I had, they would hire me. The promotion tied up the phone lines at KFWB for two days, and they couldn't make outgoing calls. They planned to sue KDAY for lost revenue, but a public apology was accepted. Needless to say, I was never hired by KFWB."

Tom was a critic of the historic payola scandal.  In 1960, he wrote in his own newsletter, "So now distributors and manufacturers are complaining that they have to wine and dine and romance deejays - get them tickets to shows, etc. Don't we even deserve this? Is this also forbidden? If taking a deejay to dinner is romancing us, then they have a lot to learn about love."  Between his on-air jobs in Los Angeles, he played Oldies on WCBS-New York and worked at KDEO-San Diego. In 1971 Tom wrote and recorded a compelling voice version/sound collage of What the World Needs Now Is Love that hit #1, staying on Billboard charts for seven weeks. Tom's son, Ron, also became a successful dj and died of cancer at age 41, leaving a wife and two kids.  Cancer struck Tom in late 1995 and he died the day before Thanksgiving. He was 66.  Near the end, Tom enthused: “I loved radio so much. About an hour before my shift was to end, I would pray that the all-night person wouldn’t come in so I could work another six hours.”

   

(Lee Chambers, George Crofford, and Tony Coles)

Clayton, Lynda: KMET, 1984-86; KLOS, 1986-90. Lynda worked at KSSJ-Sacramento until the summer of 2010. She now has an active voiceover career.
Claypool, Les: KRHM, 1957-65. Les is retired.
Clean, Steven: KPPC, 1971; KMET, 1973-75. Steve is living in Minneapolis.
Cleary, Joseph: KLOS, 1971. Unknown.

CLENARD, Val: KRKD; KMPC, 1955-72. Val was host of Lucky Lager Dance Time, and music director for the Gavin newsletter. In 1972, Golden West Broadcasting made Val news director of KMPC. Val went on to be a news reporter for KNXT/Channel 2. He retired to Las Vegas in the late 1980s. He was born on Valentines Day in 1928 and thus the name Val. He died December 2, 1996, at age 68.

Clever, Dick: KFWB, 1968-69. Between 1970 and 1996 Dick worked as investigative reporter, political writer and editor at the Seattle Post Intelligencer, Minneapolis Star and Seattle Times. He now operates a business providing investigative services for complex civil litigation and criminal defense work.

CLEWER, Brian: KRHM, 1962; KFAC, 1969-72 and 1974-81. The transplanted Englishman returned to an early love in the travel business. He died April 16, 2008. He was 79. Brian was the host of ‘Cynic’s Corner’ on KRHM and KFAC for over three decades. The transplanted Englishman arrived in the States in the early 1960s. The former advertising man treated his long-running show strictly as an avocation. His principal work was in the travel business. He owned the Continental Travel Shop in Santa Monica, formerly located in the Ambassador Hotel. The Continental Shop specialized in British foods and gifts, and later sold videos. Brian also developed a successful sideline as a travel agent, taking groups to Latin America and Japan as well as operating charter flights to the UK. At one time he was America’s largest ticketing agency for Laker Airways, the pioneer of budget transatlantic air travel. During the turbulent times at KFAC in the early 1970s, Clewer took over Classics West and the station’s Listeners’ Guild, shortly after both were founded in early 1971. He was best known for his promotion of British comedy and music.

Clifford, Chuck: KYMS, 1969; KPWR, 1987-88; KLAC, 1988-93. Chuck worked the Country format at Westwood One until early 2006. He moved to Crescent City where he was operations manager for the three Bicoastal Media stations - KCRE/fm, KPOD/fm, and AM1240. He also hosted the morning show on our Country station. He's now living in La Quinta where he converted a spare bedroom into a recording studio for both music and vocal production. "I work just enough to not interfere with golf or family activities (LOL). I was born in Lynwood and grew up in the Valley so it is kind of like coming home."
Clifton, Charles: KRKD, 1965. Charles was noted for race recreations from Santa Anita Park. Unknown.

 

(Mike Carlucci, Andy Chanley, Mr. Choc, and Colin Cowherd)

Cloud, David: KPFK; KCRW. David was best remembered as a radio pioneer who raised the level of public awareness of classic music at KPFK (in the early 1970s he was pd) and KCRW. He arrived in the Southland in 1961 after finishing graduate work at the University of Alabama. In 1981 he left radio join the staff at UCLA to train students in audio technology. David died August 27, 1998, at the age of 60.
Clyde, Buddy: KWIZ, 1965-66 and 1967-73 and 1974. Unknown.
Cobbs, Trent, KLON, 1998-2002/KKJZ, 2002-07. Trent hosted an all-night Saturday jazz show at KKJZ (formerly KLON) until the spring of 2007 when there was a management change.

COBURN, Bob: KMET, 1975-79; KLOS, 1980-94; KLSX, 1995; KZLA, 1996; KCBS, 1996-2001; KLOS, 2003-12. Born in 1948, Bob is nationally known for being the voice of "Rockline" and he owns the production company. Billboard magazine recognized "Rockline" as the best syndicated show for five years.

In 1972 Bob worked for Ron Jacobs at KGB-San Diego. Bob worked afternoon drive at KMET where he was also md. “This time was the highlight of my career!” Bob joined KLOS in the summer of 1980, from WMET-Chicago, where he was pd. In 1981, he was named assistant pd to Tommy Hadges. In 1985, Bob was the worldwide host for Live Aid, and in the 90s, anchored Roger Waters’ The Wall in Berlin and The Freddy Mercury Aids Awareness Tribute in London. Bob was the voice for NiteTrax on WTBS and he was heard on Radio Luxembourg for four years.. He also served as the Rock reporter for KABC/Channel 7.  

Bob left KLOS as part of an overall housecleaning in late 1994. Bob told the LA Times: "In a nutshell, they wanted to take the station in a different direction, and we were not part of that direction. We were perceived as part of the past, part of the old. I'd like people to know we're not dead and buried. After all, it's the only thing I know how to do. I'm completely unqualified for anything else."

In 1994, Bob started afternoon drive at the "classic rock" station, KLSX, and a few months later left with a format change to Talk and "Real Radio." In the summer of 1996 he hosted "A Very Special Evening With Crosby Stills & Nash" for the Global Network. At the same time he joined KZLA for weekends and moved to afternoons in the summer of 1996. By the end of 1996, Bob had joined “Arrow 93” in afternoon drive. In the spring of 1997 he returned as host of “Rockline.” On June 19, 2001, Bob left his afternoon drive slot at KCBS/fm and worked in San Francisco for a year before taking ownership of “Rockline.”

Coburn, Kiris: KDAY, 1989-93; KGER, 1991-97; KKLA, 1997-2003. Kiris worked at Christian KKLA until the summer of 2003. He's now in production at Premiere Radio Networks.
Cocker, Gary: KIQQ, 1975; KTNQ, 1978; KFI, 1978. Gary died June 24, 2009 of pancreatic cancer. He was 59.
Cody, Frank: KLOS, 1977-79; KMET, 1986-87; KTWV, 1987. Frank is a filmmaker living in northern New Mexico. He's been working on Internet content with Emmy winner Christopher Lowell, shooting all kinds of film and video. Frank is still involved in syndicated radio.
Coffey, Jay: KIQQ, 1977-85; KHJ, 1985-86; KRTH, 1986-2005; KKGO, 2010. Jay worked afternoons at KFRC-San Francisco until a late October 2008 format change. He joined Country KKGO in late October 2010 and left in early December 2010. He's doing voiceover work and was at the Country format at Dial-Global until the operation was moved out of state. He went on to apd and midday jock at The Walrus in San Diego until October 2014.
Cohen, Marc: KABC, 1996-2007. Marc hosted a weekend computer show at KABC until the end of 2007. He is a financial advisor with Wachovia. He's the managing director of the Westlake office.

 

 

(Larry Carroll, Joni Caryl, and Steve Candullo)

Cohen, Sherman: KGBS, 1970; XPRS, 1971-72; KRLA, 1976-77; KIIS, 1977-80; KRLA, 1980-82. The former program director at KRLA died of multiple-myeloma cancer on September 8, 2003. He was 53.
Cohen, Stacey: Stacey works for Metro Traffic Networks and is heard on KNX, among other stations.
Cole, Bob: KRLA, 1959-60. Bob passed away March 5,1998.
Cole, Bob: KBCA, 1978; KUTE, 1986; KMPC/KLIT, 1988-94. Unknown.
Cole, Nadia: KLAC, 1966. The widow of Nat "King" Cole worked the overnight shift at KLAC.
Cole, Nancy: KNX; KFWB/KTWV; KABC/KMPC; KXTA; KCTD/KMPC, 2000-02. Nancy left her post as gm at all-Sports KMPC in early 2002. She's teaching at UCLA and involved in starting a business, NewsForHire, a publishing business. She also publishes a quarterly newspaper for The Los Angeles Equestrian Center.
Coleman, Jay: KZLA, 1981. Born Jay Fritz, he has been doing weather at KNBC/Channel 4 for years.
Coleman, Pat: KBLA, 1976. Last heard Pat was working in construction in Montana.
Coles, Tony: KXEZ/KIBB, 1996-97; KBIG, 1998-99. Tony was vp/programming and operations for the six-station Clear Channel cluster in Chicago. In early 2013 he was promoted to svp of programming for the West region of Clear Channel.
Collette, Pat: KNOB, 1961-65. Unknown.

COLLIE, Biff: KLAC, 1959; KFOX, 1960-63; KBCA, 1973; KLAC. Aside from Dick Haynes, Biff was probably the best-known of all country jocks in Southern California during the 1950s and 1960s.

Born Hiram Abiff Collie in San Antonio on November 25, 1926, he got his announcing start "broadcasting" between movies at the local drive-in theater at age 13. He was Houston's first country dj. Biff started on KLAC in the late 1950s and moved to KFOX on May 2, 1960. He later returned to KLAC.

Biff married Shirley Caddell, who went from publicist for many C&W record labels to cutting a single in 1960 as Shirley Collie. Biff worked at KFOX when Billboard reported that Biff was the #1 Country dj. He moved to Nashville in 1969 and held various record jobs. He produced the first syndicated radio show, "Inside Nashville" that ran on stations across the country for many years.

In 1973 he syndicated "Inside Nashville" while he was the national promotion director for Country product at UA Records. Biff emceed a live album recording by Tex Williams at the Mint Hotel in Las Vegas. In 1976, he edited a book listing Country music radio stations across the country and sold it at truck stops. He was R&R's first Nashville editor and was inducted into the Country Hall of Fame in 1978.

During his career, he helped establish the Academy of Country Music.

Before his death in Brentwood, Tennessee on February 19, 1992, Biff earned the Ernest Tubb Humanitarian Award for his contributions.

(Mike Carruthers, Dwight Case, Steve Clark, and Alfredo Cruz)

COLLINS, Al "Jazzbeaux": KMET, 1968; KFI, 1969-71; KGBS, 1970. Born and raised in Rochester, Al was a high school swimmer from Far Rockaway, New York. He drove to Florida because he heard swimming scholarships were more easily available at Miami University. His big chance came when someone was needed to sign on and sign off for a college professor on the University radio station. He dropped out of college to start his professional career at a bluegrass station in Logan, West Virginia for $18 a week.

Later, there was WIND-Chicago where "Jazzbeaux" was created.

After a short stint in the military and a stop in Salt Lake City, he was hired for the overnight shift at WIND. In the 1950s, Al originated the "Purple Grotto" (an imaginary candle-lit cave, a hipster’s haven) on WNEW-New York, which stirred the imagination. According to Radio Digest, Al was paid $600 a week at WNEW. One New York columnist said "Al was New York as velvet egg cream." He would speak in his oft-heard beatnik lingo with Harrison, his 176-year-old Tasmanian owl that had been fitted with purple contact lenses to shield his bright orange eyes. (He loved purple, once had a Porsche covered with purple velveteen topped with a faucet.) Al described the "Grotto" as being three mythical stories beneath the studio, portraying all of its accouterments as though they were real, thereby giving the whole idea a semblance of existence. His trademarks became his characteristic mustache, goatee, brightly colored jumpsuits (he owned 150 of them) and gnome hat. He took his nickname from a once-popular brand of necktie called the "Jazz Beau" adding the "x" to the end because he thought it "made for a nice ending."

In 1960, he left WINS-New York for KSFO-San Francisco. He hosted a morning show on KGO/TV-San Francisco in the early 1960s. Al was host of tv’s The Tonight Show for a few weeks after Steve Allen abruptly quit the program. On that show he popularized the saying, "I don’t got to show you no stinkin’ badges," which he had borrowed from Treasure of Sierre Madre. In 1968, Al participated in the automated taping of "underground" music for KMET, along with Tom Donahue and B. Mitch Reed. In 1972 he went to WTAE-Pittsburgh and then KMPX-San Francisco.

Al gained national attention when Steve Allen recorded his jazzy versions of Aesop’s Fables (Be Bop’s Fables). With Allen playing piano, Al recorded a successful single, Little Red Riding Hood, and Cinderella. He also made up Grimm’s Fairy Tales for Hip Kids and jazzy, beatnik nursery rhymes. Mad Magazine once did a cartoon spread on him and his imaginary characters in the 1960s. Al went back to WNEW before returning to the Bay Area on KGO in 1977. In 1981 he was again on WNEW with a show called "Collins on a Cloud." In a Billboard interview, he described his love affair with the after-midnight listener: "I feel we are on a one-to-one basis after midnight. I am talking to them and I like to hear them talk back."

He hosted a jazz weekend show on the San Francisco Peninsula, at KCSM-San Mateo until two weeks before his death on September 29, 1997 in Mill Valley following a long battle with prostate cancer. He was 78.

Collins, Jesse: KKBT, 1994-99. Jesse worked at "the Beat."

     

(Sherman Cohen)

Collins, Joe: KMET, 1973-75. Joe lives in Fresno and sells radio/tv time and hosts a jazz show on KOKO. 
Collins, Larry: KOCM, 1987; KJOI, 1987-88. The former gm at KWXY-Palm Springs passed away in 2006.
Collins, Marvin: KCBH, 1954-57; KPOL, 1957-65; KRLA, 1965-76; KFI, 1976-2000. Retired from KFI after being chief engineer for 20 years. Marvin is now retired for ten years and still enjoying retirement while doing part time technical work for KBLA AM Santa Monica/Los Angeles.

COLLINS, Robert L.: KFI, 1969. Bob left KFI and went on to do mornings at legendary station, WGN-Chicago. On Tuesday, February 8, 2000, Bob was killed in a freak private-plane crash. Two small planes collided over Zion, which is about 45 miles north of downtown Chicago, near the Illinois-Wisconsin line. One of the planes was sent into the roof of a hospital. Windows blew out of the top floor of Midwestern Regional Medical Center and crumpled. Besides Collins, two others were killed in the collision.

Bob’s gm at WGN, Steve Carver said that Bob was successful and respected because "he created a one-to-one relationship with each of us. He was a trusted friend and a great communicator, someone who related to us without an ounce of pretension. We will remember Bob as part rebel and part teddy bear - a thoughtful voice who was always involved in his community."

He recently signed a new five-year, multimillion-dollar deal with the station. As the city's top morning radio personality after replacing the irreplaceable Wally Phillips in 1986, Collins was the only radio figure in Chicago to have a double-digit share of the radio audience in the highly competitive talk radio scene. With a 10.4 share of the radio audience, he had almost twice the number of listeners as his closest competitors, according to Jim Kirk of the Chicago Tribune. He was 57.

Collins, Roger: KFI, 1978-83; KUTE, 1983-87; KLIT, 1989-90. Roger is the general manager of KZGL ("Eagle 103.7/fm) in Flagstaff, Arizona. He's working under his birth name, Paul Lancaster.
Colmes, Alan: KTLK, 2007-08; KGIL, 2008. The co-host of Hannity & Colmes has a syndicated show carried in the evenings by 1260AM, KGIL.
Comb, Bill: XTRA, 1967; KKDJ, 1971-72. Bill works in real estate in Victorville.
Compton, Chris: KRLA, 1964; KPFK, 1969-72; KTPI, 1991-2005. Chris works morning drive at Antelope Valley's KTPI.

COMPTON, Paul: KIEV; KHJ, 1962-65; KMPC, 1965-68; KGIL, 1969-71; KFI, 1971-75; KRLA, 1975-76. Frank Sinatra's favorite disc jockey and the host of "Sinatra, Compton and Strings," Paul died April 17, 1996, at the age of 79.

During his time on KGIL, Don Page of the LA Times awarded him the 1969 MOR radio dj of the year honor. On June 12, 1971, Paul departed KGIL. At his farewell he said, "I hated to leave that beautiful club. They were so great to me. They gave me complete freedom in the selection and sequencing of my music." Page was an enormous fan of Paul's, describing his style as "the original Mr. Cool, a voice like aged Scotch and the ever-present shades." Don said that Paul was the "acknowledged expert on the musical life and times of Frank Sinatra. Each considers the other the leader of the clan."

During Paul's stay at KFI, Page said, "Paul Compton is the best disc jockey in the business. No one has better presence than Compton." Paul was on the air the day before Bill Drake launched "Boss Radio" on KHJ. It is rumored that he had an opportunity to be a "Boss Jock" but declined.

Born Paul Compton Abbot in Ontario, he grew up in Long Beach and majored in journalism at Los Angeles City College and San Diego State. Paul had a brief career as a club jazz singer.

Condylis, Paul: KNX, 1960; KHJ, 1963. Unknown.

CONFER, Noel: XEAK ("Mighty 690"), 1956-61. Noel, a Top 40 jock at the “Mighty 690” at XEAK, died June 14, 2009, in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He was 78.

Born in Baxter Springs, Kansas in 1931, he moved to Tulsa at age 11. After a stint in the army and studies at Tulsa University, Noel worked as a radio actor at KAKC-Tulsa. He did summer stock theatre in Michigan and became an equity actor in Hollywood in the early 1950s. From Tulsa’s first Top 40 station, Noel joined mornings at XEAK, a station perhaps better known as “The Mighty 690.”

In 1961, he became nd/dj/pd at KDEO-San Diego. Three years later he worked as pd and afternooner at KSON-San Diego. During the 1970s, Noel programmed KOZN-San Diego. In 1980 it was back to KSON. “During my quarter of a century in San Diego, I freelanced tv spots and acted at San Diego’s Old Globe Theatre,” said Noel in an interview. In 1982, he moved to the desert south of Palm Springs and became pd and morning man at KROP.

In 1996, Noel retired after 50 years on air. He married in 1953 and had three sons. His wife died in 1969 and he spent many years raising his sons and tending to his horses.

Coniff, Jim: KKOP; KAPP. Unknown what the son of Ray Coniff is doing.
Conin, Al: KMPC, 1983-92. Al is a former Angel broadcaster who job as voice of the Angels ended October 4, 1992. He has called some San Diego Padres games on radio and tv.
Conlee, Don: KEZY, 1985-86. See Don Allen.

 

(Doug Cox, Julie Chin, King Cotton and Jay Coffey)

Conlee, Jim: KTNQ, 1979; KHTZ, 1979-80; KKHR, 1983; KMGG, 1985. Jim is the ops manager at the Main Line Broadcasting-Richmond cluster. He's also the pd of “Big Oldies 107.3” WBBT and its fm simulcast partner, WARV, Petersburg. Jim also works morning drive at “Big Oldies.”

CONLEY, Dave: KTNQ, 1976-77; KHJ, 1978-79. Dave died August 28, 2005. He was 63. Dave was living in In 2003, LARadio reported that Dave Conley had died. A year later, Dave resurfaced, very much alive, living in a hotel in Rosarita Beach, Mexico. Dave, former 10Q and KHJ Top 40 jock, lived a very fast life so the reports of his death did come as a shock to his close friends. This summer, Dave did die in a Rosarita Beach hotel room. (Conley photo from 1975)

From LARadio in 2003: Every time Dave Conley would burn out his welcome at a radio station, he would disappear for a while and then like Jay Gatsby, reappear. Dave would reappear in some new, distant market. When I got the note from KROQ’s Boyd R. Britton (Doc on the ROQ) that Dave passed away this summer, I thought it was another of those mysterious disappearances that Dave was so famous for.   

Dave and I were in the same Bill Ogden FCC 1st Class License school in Burbank in 1965. We spent more time in Don’s hamburger joint next-door drinking beer than we did cramming for the test to secure a First Phone. We both passed the examination and we ended up in the same market, he at KSEE-Santa Maria and I at KNEZ-Lompoc. We drank, caroused and drank some more as we started our radio journey. It was an exciting time, far more than the market would allow. He went on to be an incredible Top 40 jock.   

“I used to share a house with Dave back in 1973,” wrote Boyd. “He pulled 25 shares on KCBQ-San Diego in afternoon drive. He'd also been at WMYQ-Miami, and was dj/pd/consultant for stations like KACY-Oxnard/Pt. Hueneme and KAFY-Bakersfield  with music and contest savvy that repeatedly rescued their ratings. His compelling voice and ‘non-jock’ delivery scored again at “B-100”-San Diego and he joined the ‘Ten-Q Crew’ as a key player on Jimi Foxx's ‘Last of the AM Top 40s, KTNQ,” emailed Boyd.   

I hadn’t talked with Dave since one of our gatherings on the Central California Coast in the mid-1960s. In the early 1990s when I was researching my first book, Los Angeles Radio People, trying to track Dave down took me to one station after another. Someone heard him in San Antonio in the mid-1980s. I found him, but missed him by a few months. The pd thought that he had headed west. The trail got warm in Portland but by the time I had found his station he was gone and so was anyone who was there when he was there.    

And so it went with the ultimate radio nomad, setting up camp, only to tear it down at a moment’s notice and move on. You never knew how long Dave would stay at a radio station, but while he was there it was a real treat. At KACY, he called himself “The Clean Living Kid,” which represented, at best, wishful thinking on his part. In 1997 someone passed on Dave’s number in Texas. With apprehension and some excitement I called. “Hey, Barrett, we sure snowed them at Ogden’s didn’t we?” he said with that unmistakable voice. I asked him what was going on? He told me that a hooker was dancing on his kitchen table. I didn’t disbelieve him.    

“A fanatic sports lover, Dave was also a closet intellectual with a Master's degree,” remembered Boyd. “Dave boasted of doing his thesis on Eliot's Wasteland in a single LSD trip, and was trained as a Czech linguist by the Army Security Agency. From before the time I knew him, Conley was also a chronic alcoholic, which, unchecked, cost him his career and ultimately his life," said Boyd.    

The final curtain has come down on the original midday jock from the debut of "the new 10Q, KTNQ." 

Connors, Al: KHJ, 1979-80; KORG, 1980; KRTH, 1986-93. Al is programming WOMG/Oldies 103 and NewsTalk 1320 WIS-Columbia, South Carolina.
Conrad, Rod: KOCM/KSRF, 1988. Last heard he was working in Denver.
Conrad, Sean: KHJ, 1973. Sean was sm at KDON-Salinas and last heard he was living in Santa Cruz.
Contreras, Chuck: KSRF, 1993; KLSX, 1993; KSCA 1994-95. Chuck works at Paramount Pictures as the engineer in charge of television production engineering. He has a voiceover and communications tower business. Chuck is also a consultant for radio stations. 
Conway, Jr., Tim: KLSX, 1997-2009; KFI, 2009-14. Tim left the FM Talk Station on 2.20.09 with a format flip to AMP RADIO. He hosts evenings for KFI.
Cook, Charlie: KHJ, 1981-82; KLAC, 1982-83; KKGO, 2009-10. Charlie is operations manager for Cumulus/Nashville and pd of WSM-WKDF-Nashville. Charlie was inducted into the Country Hall of Fame in 2011.
Cook, Del: KGFJ; KLON, 1988-90. Del died in 1991.
Cook, Geri: KRLA, KIEV, KGIL. Geri, L.A.'s original Bargain Lady, died on March 19, 2008. She was 83.

(Adam Carolla, Cassandra (Elvira), Rich Cartter, Marc Cohen, and Dennis Cruz)

COOK, Ira: KFAC; KABC, 1948; KMPC, 1949-71; KVFM, 1972. Ira started his Los Angeles career at Classical KFAC, but his success and long-term longevity came at KMPC. He began at KMTR in 1938 as a record librarian and sometime announcer. He had just graduated from Stanford with a degree in basic medical science.

His love affair with radio started at age 8 on a visit to a local station with his father. Ira was born and raised in Duluth, Minnesota. “During World War II I was at the Battle of the Bulge and we lost 10-15 guys in my platoon.” After World War II service, Ira hooked up with Frank Bull to broadcast the fights and wrestling from the Olympic Auditorium. He went on to host Lucky Lager Dance Time on KFAC. He also had a fascination with being a songwriter.

In a 1957 Newsweek story connected with a payola probe, Ira made the following comment about being a dj: "It's safer than stealing, more legal than gambling, easier than loafing, and it beats working!" He made a career out of his association with Hawaiian music. He played one Hawaiian song an hour and brought Don Ho to the Mainland at the height of Ho's career. “In college I became intrigued with Hawaiian music and I went to the Islands for 12 years straight.”

Another popular feature was "Star of the Day," in which Ira featured one track from one artist every half-hour. Between 1960 and 1972, Ira hosted over 3,000 AFRTS programs "It was really fascinating getting letters from servicemen in Iceland asking about Hawaiian music. It seemed to be as popular there as country music."

He had an extraordinary relationship with sponsors. Wallichs Music City sponsored his program for 20 years and Felix Chevrolet for 10. In 1968 Ira appeared in the Gene Barry tv series, Incident in Berlin. About the same time, he was broadcasting a show called "Lunch With the Stars," from Universal Pictures' lot, each day at noon.

Ira retired in the early 1980s. “The music really turned bad. I don’t know how I could exist. Since retiring, I haven’t had a dull day.” He loved golf  and shot 6 holes-in-one at the Los Robles course. “At Simi Valley I shot a hole-in-one on a 170 yard hole. “The very next week I’m playing with Red Skelton, Art Gilmore and AFTRA’s Claude McKeen and I shot another one on the very same hole.”

Ira died May 15, 2007. He was 90.

Cook, Jay: KIIS, 1979-80. Jay was the former KIIS gm from 1979 to 1980. He started his radio career at WHBQ in Memphis and spent 14 years at WFIL-Philadelphia as pd. When he left the Southland, Jay took executive positions with KSD-St. Louis, WIQI-Tampa, and WUSA-Tampa. Jay retired in 1994 and passed away at his home in Palm Harbor, Florida, following a battle with cancer on April 2, 1999. He was 61.
Cook, John: KIIS, 1996-97. John is pd at WNUW-Philadelphia.
Cook, Jonathan: KLSX, 1995. Unknown.
Cook, Lonnie: KTYM, 1962-65; KAPP, 1965; KFOX, 1965; KBCA, 1968. Lonnie is the executive director of the Doo Wop Hall of Fame.
Cook, Lou: KABC, 1943-89. Lou was a longtime KABC announcer. He was one of the original hosts of the popular Sunday night program, "Religion on the Line." Lou passed away in 1993.
Cook, Paul: KYSR, 2000-01. Paul has written a book, Cooked in LA, about his experiences with radio in L.A. and his battles with alcoholism.
Cooke, Dave: KHJ, 1977-78; KABC/KMPC/KTZN/KDIS, 1996-98; KFWB, 1998-2000. Dave left his pd post at KPLX in Dallas in early 2007.
Cooley, Brian: KKBT, 1991-94. Brian is director of CNET Radio in San Francisco.
Cooper, Bill: KRLA, KFWB, 1986-2002 and 2006-09; KNX, 2009-12. The former news reporter at KFWB was the communications director for Ed Royce, congressman from the 40th district until the end of 2005. Bill rejoined KFWB until a format flip in early fall of 2009. He moved to sister station, KNX.
Cooper, Bob: KABC, 1958. Unknown.
Cooper, Brandt: KMPC/fm, 1988. Unknown.
Cooper, Ken: KFI, 1983-84; KZLA/KLAC, 1989-93; KYMS, 1994-95. Ken does a syndicated show for Super Radio called Retro Country USA. He also has a full service production company in Tampa.
Cooper
, Kim: KIKF; KYMS. Kim is with AirWatch America broadcasting traffic for several stations.

       

(Jerry Clark, Chris Carter, Joe Collins, Buddy Clyde, and Jane Chastain)

Cooper, Sam: KMET, 1972. Unknown.
Coppola, Mark: KLOS, 1977. Mark is at WAXQ-New York.
Copps, John: KCRW, 1971-77; KSRF, 1977-96. John is retired and spends his time fishing and riding motorcycles.
Corbett, Kat: KLYY, 1998-99; KROQ, 1999-2014. Kat is working middays at KROQ.

CORDIC, Rege: KNX, 1966; KRLA, 1981-82. Rege was most successful for a long run at KDKA-Pittsburgh (once commanded 85% share of the audience). He died of brain cancer and had been suffering from colon and prostate cancer, on April 16, 1999. He was 73.

Rege came to the Southland to replace Bob Crane at KNX when Crane left radio to star in Hogan’s Heroes. Rege also worked morning drive at KRLA before turning to an acting career.

In his later years, Cordic became well-known for his bit-acting in popular tv shows such as Gunsmoke and Ironside and for the baritone voice in countless commercials, but in Pittsburgh he will be forever known as a radio "personality" before the industry became saturated with them. His show became an icon in Pittsburgh, starting at WWSW in the mid-1940s and then moving to KDKA in 1954. Rege and his colleagues invented a cast of characters who would drop by the studio to harass the host.

Over the years, however, Cordic began to burn out. He moved to California in 1966, where the idea was to re-make the show for the Los Angeles morning drive market. He was on the air for a year and a half before the station switched to all-News. The Pittsburgh flavor of his show just didn't jibe with listeners in California. "I heard him out there when I made trips," said a colleague. "The problem was it wasn't Pittsburgh. He was a Pittsburgh character.

Rege was born in Hazelwood, PA. As a boy, he spent a lot of time at the P&LE Railroad Station, where his father worked. He credited his father with turning him into "a railroad freak." He attended Pitt Tech and New York University. After two years in the Navy, he returned to the station and in 1948 launched his own half-hour program. It was an immediate success.

Cordic fell in love with the California lifestyle after serving in the Navy there and never returned to Pittsburgh permanently after 1966. But even after he left, he was known to a generation of Pittsburghers for hosting Sunday afternoon movies on WTAE/TV. He would fly in from Los Angeles to tape the segments, and later he did the tapings at a studio in Las Vegas. He tried regular acting for about 10 years, landing small tv roles. "I enjoyed it but I didn't think I was getting anywhere," he once said. "Usually, I died before the first commercial."

He switched to voice acting, using his famous baritone in many voice-overs in tv spots for such companies as Pennzoil, Roy Rogers, Plymouth, Hires Root Beer, Spray 'N Wash and Greyhound. He was also the voice of KABC/Channel 7 for promotions and documentaries. In his later years, Cordic admitted he was never as popular in California as he had been in Pittsburgh. But it didn't bother him. "We announcers sort of function in our own little world," he said in a 1985 interview. "I'm kind of anonymous, but it's a pleasant kind of anonymity. I rather enjoy it." Mr. Cordic divorced in 1980 but remained close with his four children, all of whom live in California. Mr. Cordic's many voices will live on. At the Senator John Heinz Pittsburgh Regional History Center, there's an exhibit of a 1950s suburban kitchen with the radio tuned to Cordic's morning show.

Cordier, Dale: KRLA. Dale broadcast traffic for many years in the Southland, heard on KRLA and USA Radio News. Born July 1, 1952, in Pennsylvania, he graduated from Burbank High School in 1970 and served in the U.S. Army. Dale died August 28, 2001, at the age of 49.
Corn Dogg: KKBT; 1540/KMPC; KJLH, 2008. Cornelius "Corn Dogg" Edwards is known as Cornelius Prince on KJLH.
Cornell, Skip: KIQQ, 1975. Unknown.
Corrales, Jay: KRLA, 1994-2000. Jay was on the production staff at KABC.
Cory, Bob: KNOB, 1966; KEZY. Unknown.
Cosgrove, Joe: KPOL, 1957-63. After KPOL, Joe was the founding general manager of KTHO-South Lake Tahoe. "The station turned a profit the first year of operation," said Cosgrove. A year later he worked for Senator Barry Goldwater in his run for the Presidency. He became friends with Ronald Reagan and later produced a special video program featuring him. He worked for three Fortune 500 companies, including Harvey Aluminum, Martin Marietta and General Automation. Joe went on to be gm at KMIR/TV in Palm Springs. Joe produced various projects including a segment for a Bob Hope Christmas Special in 1993, Jack LaLanne’s first work out video, and also created and produced Jack’s Big Swim for fitness when Jack towed 70 people in 70 boats with his hands and feet shackled at Long Beach by the Queen Mary to celebrate his70th birthday. Joe's currently writing a series of innovative books and the first: Walt Dreamers Me, released in May 2013.

(Mark "the Shark" Christian, Steve Casey, "Chachi", and Lonnie Cook)

Cotton, Chuck: KMPC, 1967-71. Chuck is gm at KSSK/KIKI/KUCD/KNDD/KHVH-Honolulu.
Cotton, King: KIEV, 1992; KWIZ, 1992-93. He is an actor, a session singer, does commercial voiceovers and compiles CD reissue paks.
Counts, Steve: KABC/KNX, 2001-04; KRLA, 2004-14. Steve is a news anchor for 870/KRLA and KTIE.

COURTNEY, David: David broadcast traffic and news from the traffic services for many years. He was also an actor and the P.A. announcer for the Los Angeles Kings (24 years), Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (19 years) and the Los Angeles Clippers (5 years). David died November 29, 2012. He was 56.

From his Facebook page: "The heartwarming - and ongoing - story of a Boy and his Microphone! I had the great fortune of being raised around the television business. My father, Alan, was a vp of NBC at 30 Rock in the 50's & 60's, and president of MGM's Television Division through the 70's. Through this I met so many great performers and influences - Steve Allen, Jackie Gleason (called me when I was a sick child... that'll cure you fast), Gene Rayburn, Gary Owens, Bob Newhart, MTM and so many others.

Then there are the personalities in sports I have worked around and with since I was a teen, starting with Bob Miller and Chick Hearn. Sat next to them in a press box for a few years and see if you don't learn something. Of course, John Ramsey taught me everything I know about P.A. announcing and I have been blessed to sit behind four of the microphones he manned for so many years. Growing up, I wanted to be Johnny Olson and, fortunately, I was given a voice to work with. Still waiting for my game show break but in the meantime, happy that I found my niche announcing for sports teams and events. Along with my daily work on the radio, I got the occasional movie [Tooth Fairy, Angels in the Outfield, 61* and Home Improvement] and commercial voiceover.

All ALMOST as great as finding the love of my life - Janet. We were married October 16, 2010, in front of family and friends at Lake Mission Viejo where we live. It was the first [and last] marriage for both of us and definitely worth the wait!"

Coussey, Russell: KJLH, 1995. Unknown.
Cowan, Brian: KIKF, 1995. Unknown.
Cowgill, Jim: KNOB, 1955-57; KFOX, 1957-59. After stints in the U.S. Army and stations in San Luis Obispo during the 1960s, Jim was with Voice of America from 1971-2001. He retired from Voice of America in 2001 as Director, Broadcast Support Division. In 2004, Jim moved to Saint Simons Island, Georgia.
Cowherd, Colin, KSPN, 2006-14. Colin leads the Herd in morning drive at KSPN.
Cox, Chris: KEZY, 1991-99. Chris is the operations director for the six Cumulus stations in the Ventura/Oxnard/Santa Barbara cluster.
Cox, Courtland: KLYY, 1998. Courtland is a writer, "WebRIOT," MTV.
Cox, Daryl: KGFJ, 1990. Unknown.
Cox, Don: KHJ, 1977-78. Don died in his sleep on September 14, 2003. He was 55.

 

(Kathleen Carey, Ray Crockett, and Michael Castner)

Cox, Doug: KRLA, 1968-69; KPPC, 1970-71. Doug is currently the Director of Corporate Culture for Seminole Gaming, one of the great powers in the world of casinos and gaming. "The Seminole Tribe of Florida is the owner of Seminole Gaming and the 'Hard Rock' brand around the world. This is one exciting and successful business," said Doug.
Cox, Tony: KFWB, 1969-84. Tony has hosted entertainment tv shows.
Cox, Vicki: KFWB, 1989-2005; KNX, 2005-08; KRLA, 2011-12. Vicki joined KNX as an afternoon news anchor in early 2005 and left in the fall of 2008 following a company downsizing. She is now heard delivering news at KCRW.
Coyle, Jim: KWKW, 1956-58; KALI, 1958-68. Jim was gm at KALI and left the station in 1968 in a contract dispute, which he won. He then bought the Spanish language station KCTY-Salinas and owned it until 1984. Jim was also part owner of KRAY-Fremont. He died February 19, 1991, in Salinas.
Craig, Steve: KEZY, 1978; KGGI, 1986-90; KROQ, 1988-89.  Since the early 1990s, Steve has been doing middays at Atlanta’s Modern Rock “99X.”

CRAMER, Doug: KGIL, 1949-53; KFI, 1953-76; KHOF, 1961-85; KKLA, 1994-2005. Doug died on February 14, 2013, of respiratory problems, according to his colleague, Greg Crawford. “Doug had Alzheimer's. He spent the last two years of his life in Hemet,” wrote Crawford. “Doug was one of my dearest and oldest friends, helping me get into the radio business back in the 60's. Most of his career, at least as long as I had known him, he worked two jobs having very view days off.”  

Doug started his radio career in 1949, just three months out of high school, joining KGIL as a record librarian. He also hosted a show called “Teen Time,” which featured early 50s hits. Doug joined the Air Force during the Korean conflict only to return to KGIL two years later. In 1953, he moved to KFI. It was here that Doug discovered that he worked best when he was doing two jobs at the same time.  

“KCKC-San Bernardino had a Sunday evening show called ‘The Wax Museum.’ It was a horror show; rather it was a nostalgia epic that spotlighted records of the 20s through the 40s with artist interviews. This show lasted 5 years,’” said Doug when he was interviewed for Los Angeles Radio People

In 1961 he joined Faith Center at KHOF, which was eventually led by Dr. Gene Scott when he became pastor in 1975. For years, Doug was the announcer heard on Dr. Scott’s worldwide broadcasts. In 1976, Doug was part of Harry O’Connor Creative Programs to sell talk radio features. In 1994, he became a weekend announcer at KKLA. Doug was active in the Pacific Pioneer Broadcasters.

Cramer, Jim: KLAC, 2002; KFI, 2004-05; KNX, 2006. Jim's syndicated financial talk show aired for only a few months in 2006 at KNX.
Crandall, Brad: KFI, 1974. Brad passed away in the early 1990s.

CRANE, Bob: KNX, 1956-65; KMPC, 1972-73. Bob is best known for his starring role as Col. Robert Hogan in Hogan's Heroes. He played the rakishly handsome leader of a merry band of World War II Allied airmen in a German POW camp for six years beginning in 1965.

His nine-year radio career on KNX was like a late-night tv variety show, only on radio. He was brash, irreverent, quick-witted and the master of the innocent insult. Initially, his contract forbade him to do tv. He loved to act and spent a number of years in dinner theater. When his tv exclusion clause expired, Carl Reiner put Bob on The Dick Van Dyke Show. He played Dave Kelsy on the Donna Reed series. His morning competition was KMPC's Dick Whittinghill, with whom he developed a feud that raged for nine years; they were contemptuous of each other.

When Bob returned to Southland radio briefly on KMPC, he said, "I want to go out like Nelson Eddy, you know, die while I'm working."

His tv show was in an era when contracts did not allow series stars to get rich from residuals. After a quickly canceled 1975 sitcom, The Bob Crane Show, and some tv guest shots, Crane had settled into the nomadic limbo of Sun Belt dinner theater.

In June of 1978 he left for Scottsdale to appear in a dinner theater production of a play called Beginners Luck, which he had performed many times in many towns. On June 29, 1978, Crane was beaten to death as he slept in a Scottsdale, Arizona apartment. According to a coroner's report, his face, bloodied and swollen from beatings, was unrecognizable. He had an electric cord tied around his neck in a bow. In 1994 a Phoenix jury acquitted a man accused of killing Bob. The accused had been a longtime friend of Crane’s. In 1997, Bob Crane, Jr., donated a sizeable collection of his father’s airchecks to the Museum of TV & Radio. One promotion vinyl album that KNX put out featured Bob and another jock turned tv star, Pat Buttram.

Crane, Charlie: KLAC, 1970. Unknown.

(Charlie Cook, Alan Chapman, Tony Cox, Jay Curtis, and Sean Conrad)

Crane, David: KLAC, 1965-69. David bought a radio station in St. Augustine, Florida. Unknown.
Crane, Frank: The advertising and radio executive was the former president of the Southern California Broadcasters Association and a campaign manager for the March of Dimes. A colleague remarked: "Frank was always promoting." He died of cancer in July 1992, at the age of 77.

CRANE, Fred: KFAC, 1947-87. Fred, a veteran personality at Classical KFAC over four decades, died August 21, 2008. He was 90. Born March 22, 1918, Fred came to Los Angeles in the late 1930s from New Orleans to become an actor. He auditioned for and won the role of one of the Tarleton boys in the classic film, Gone With the Wind. In fact, Fred give the opening line in the first scene of the film. After his cinematic debut, Fred became a radio announcer for KFAC, where he held forth for well over 40 years as the morning drive time announcer until being dismissed on New Year's Day 1987. Fred successfully sued the station for $1 million for punitive damages and reinstatement of his job when he was replaced by younger announcers.

Occasionally Fred continued to be hired as an actor. He was cast in soap operas like General Hospital and other tv shows including Peyton Place, 77 Sunset Strip and he was the voice of Alpha Control on Lost in Space. In his later years, Fred ran a bed and breakfast inn in Atlanta with a Gone With the Wind motif. 

CRANE, Les: KLAC, 1969-70. Les was a Talk show host at KLAC in the late 1960s and ‘70s. Born Les Stein, he started his radio career at KONO-San Antonio in 1958 and later worked at WPEN-Philadelphia. He became very popular in San Francisco radio as Johnny Raven. In 1961, Les was working at KGO and KYA and was awarded the Gavin PD of the Year award.  He died July 13, 2008. He was 74.

In 1965, Les was the host of an unusual late night ABC/TV talk show that lasted only 14 weeks. His identity gimmick was going into his studio audience with a shotgun microphone. He also sat perched on a high chair above his guests. At the time, Les was called the “bad boy of late night television,” one of the first of many unsuccessful challengers to Johnny Carson. Les was married to Tina Louise of Gilligan’s Island. He recorded the hit talking single, Desiderata, that was awarded a Grammy for “Best Spoken Word.” Les went on to an enormously successful career in computer software called The Software Toolworks, creators of the three-dimensional color chess series, Chessmaster, and the best-selling educational series, 'Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing.' 

Crann, Tom: KUSC, 1991-92 and 1994-95. Tom is with Minnesota Public Radio and is a regional host for "All Things Considered."
Crawford, Dick: KFAC, 1948-83. Dick passed away in the early 1990s.
Crawford, Jean: KCBH. Jean owned KMGM (later KCBH) in Beverly Hills. The station was sold in the mid-1960s and turned into KJOI. Jean died in September 1991 at the age of 84.

CREAGH, David: KLON, 1981-85, gm. David was the executive responsible for turning KLON, the Long Beach State radio station, into a jazz outlet. He died December 16, 2011, following a short illness associated with treatment of a cancer diagnosed in November. He was 60. Before his arrival at KLON, he produced All Things Considered for NPR. He left the Southland in the mid-1980s to program a new public radio station in Baltimore, WJHU.

“Dave was in the vanguard of public radio pioneers who laid the foundations for a vital communications network,” said John Dimsdale, Washington bureau chief for American Public Media’s Marketplace and a former colleague at NPR from a Current.org obituary. “Over his career, he established high standards for engineering, journalism, production and station management. We are all in his debt.” 

Creagh became one of the network’s first employees, hired on Jan. 2, 1969, as it moved to begin operations in April 1971. He was initially the technical director of ATC and became its executive producer during NPR’s formative years in the 1970s. In the 1980s he managed the CPB-supported Satellite Program Development Fund (SPDF), which provided seed money for programs to be distributed over the new Public Radio Satellite System. 

“As a young, station-based reporter in the ’70s, everything about NPR was intimidating — except Dave Creagh. He was encouraging,” said John Stark, now gm of KNAU in Flagstaff. Dave Creagh’s legacy is everywhere in the public radio system.” 

In the mid-’90s, when funding for the field was at risk, Creagh helped launch and later served as senior vp of the non-profit Alliance for Public Broadcasting, which developed discount perks for station members. 

Creagh was born September 25, 1951, in Washington, DC. He graduated from the University of Maryland in 1972.

Cridland, Diane: KABC, 1992-94. Diane is station manager at KSRO-Santa Rosa.

 

(Stan Campbell, Lee Cameron, and Lisa Canning)

CROCKER, Frankie: KGFJ, 1968-72; KUTE, 1979-80. Frankie died of cancer on October 21, 2000. He was 63.

He had his major success in New York, returning to WBLS three times. Frankie came to the Southland to duplicate his success with the "New York disco sound." For many years he was vp of entertainment and programming of Inner City Broadcasting. In the mid-1980s, Frankie was hosting NBC/TV's Friday Night Videos and was one of the original VH-1 veejays. In 1987, Frankie became a consultant to WRXR-Chicago and also programmed WGCI-Chicago. He was on-air at WWRL-New York and WMCA-New York. In early 1994 he was hosting the "Quiet Storm" show via satellite to WBLS from his home in Coldwater Canyon. In late 1995 Frankie rode back to New York as "the Sheriff" and rejoined WBLS for the fourth time.

One of America's premiere radio personalities, Frankie exuded a cool combination of charm and style, intellect and humor, making him one of the top rated djs of our time. Honored in the prestigious Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland. Also an actor, he has appeared in the films: Cleopatra Jones, Death Drug, 5 On The Blackhand Side, Darktown Strutters and Behind Closed Walls. Frankie got his start on WUFO in Buffalo while attending The University of Buffalo as a pre-law student. He did everything from jazz, his first love, to r&b, gospel, hosted several different ethnic community programs. Frankie also served as the stations news director while holding down a part-time dj shift. He also worked at KGCI and WNUA-Chicago, and WKKS-St. Louis.

Frankie was one of the all-time favorite Masters of Ceremonies and promoters at the world famous Apollo Theater in New York City where he is ensconced on their "Wall of Fame," along with other great stars. One of the fabulous stories about Frankie was, upon returning to the Big Apple, he entered New York City's hottest nightclub, "Studio 54," wearing a tuxedo and riding on a white horse. That night he reclaimed the New York "radio crown." The crowd went wild, and the press loved it! It was stunts like these that added to his legendary status. Billboard Magazine has given Frankie numerous awards for "Program Director of the Year," and "Air Personality of the Year."

Crockett, Ray: KXTA, 2004-05. The 15-year NFL cornerback who won two Super Bowl rings with the Denver Broncos joined XTRA Sports for a Talk show in late Spring 2004 and left a year later. He now lives in Southlake, Texas, a suburb of Dallas.
Crofford, George: KPOL, 1957-72. When George left KPOL he became a tennis instructor. He died October 31, 1994.
Cronan, Stu: KBCA, 1968. Unknown.

CROOK, Ed: KWKW, 1953-55; KDWC, 1957-60; KGRB, 1960-65; KWOW, 1965-69. Ed worked on-air as Dave Gilmore. He also spent time at KPRO-Riverside (1955-57).

Ed moved to Lake Tahoe in 1974 and founded KRLT/fm. He was general manager of KPTL/KKBC Carson City/Reno in the early 1980s, followed by a stint as gm at KROI AM&FM. 

Ed has been at KTHO-Lake Tahoe since 2001 and is heard hourly nights and weekends announcing the local weather forecast.

 

 

(Zeke Chaidez, Corn Dogg, and Karen Carson)

Cross, Lee: KGFJ, 1968. Lee is Roland Bynum. It was the name Arnold Schorr selected for him when he came to L.A. from Montgomery. After a stint in Charlotte, he returned to L.A. and used his birth name.
Cross, Tom: KGFJ, 1968-74. Tom is a motivational speaker, consultant, counselor and business coach.

CROSSWHITE, Paul: KJOI; KNX/fm; KWST, 1970s; KFWB; KEZY, 1980; KNX; KRTH, 1985-88; KFI, KTWV, 1990-2001. Paul worked morning drive at "the Wave" until the Fall of 2001. He died August 17, 2012, following a long illness.Paul had been in the hospital for much of the month prior to his death. He was battling a health problems that he had been fighting for several years.

Paul did news during most of his tenure in Southern California radio and has received Golden Mike Awards for documentary, feature and best newscast. He did news during the glory years of KNX/fm. During the Gulf War, he won the Associated Press Award for best newscast.

When he moved to "the WAVE," he gave up news to become a deejay, originally in the evenings and, later, mornings after the female morning drive team collapsed. In the summer 1995 WAVE Newsletter, Paul talked of his morning assignment: "There's something almost magical about the music we play on 'the WAVE.' From the moment I became morning host, I felt that soothing effect. It can elevate one's mood - even before the sun comes up - into something really positive and good-feeling." Paul left KTWV in the spring of 2001.

Crouch, Paul: KREL, 1965-71; KHOF, 1972-73. Paul is the founder and one of the leaders of Trinity Broadcasting Network since 1973.
Crowe, Deanna: KFI; KLAC, 1982; KMPC, 1982-83; KHTZ, 1985; KTWV, 1987. Deanna briefly hosted one of the tv home shopping networks.
Crowe, Jim: KLSX, 1990. Since 1991, Jim has worked as a promotion manager for Mercury/Polygram Records.
Crowell, George: KHJ, 1959; KPOL, 1960s. George has passed away.
Crowley, Mort: KHJ, 1963. The funny morning man arrived in Southern California from WKNR-Detroit, WLS-Chicago and KXOK-St. Louis. Mort has passed away.
Crozier, Michael: KFI, 2002-14. Michael Crozier is part of the news operation at KFI. In the summer of 2014, he became a fill-in weekend talk show host.
Crummey, Joe: KFI, 1988; KMPC, 1994; KFI, 1994-95; KMPC, 1995-96; KLSX, 1996; KMPC/KTZN, 1996-97; KABC, 1997-2000 and 2002-04. Joe left KFYI-Phoenix in the spring of 2007. He went on to mid-mornings at WABC-New York and left in December 2011.
Cruz, Alfredo: KLON, 1995-2002/KKJZ, 2002-03. Alfredo left the Long Beach all-Jazz station in late 2003. He's living in the Inland Empire.

CRUZ, David: KFI/KTLK, 2012-14. David joined Clear Channel's two talk stations following pressure from alliance's pushing for greater on-air diversity. He hosts the afternoon drive show at Progressive KTLK and for a time in 2012 a weekend show at KFI.

Prior to joining CCM&E, Cruz was with KNBC/Channel 4 where he anchored one of the highest-rated daily news programs.

As a broadcaster, Cruz has been nationally-recognized for his groundbreaking news reports including his National Emmy-award winning MSNBC report on Latino Immigrants, “The New Americans” as well as his work on CNN as anchor/moderator of the nation’s first nationally syndicated bilingual talk radio program, “La Voz de Texas” (“The Voice of Texas”).

Cruz began his broadcast career with the Spanish International Network as news director, KWEX/TV, the first Spanish language television station in the United States. Since then, he has also worked for CBS, ABC and NBC affiliates and O&O’s. Among his assignments, Cruz has covered everything from conflicts in foreign countries, travels by Presidents and Popes to raging wildfires and floods in California.

Cruz has received numerous awards including the 2005 Golden Eagle, one of the highest honors bestowed by the media industry in Hollywood for professional achievement. He also received the Liberty Award, the highest distinction given to journalists for news coverage and community involvement in Education by the Latin Voters of America. Cruz is also a twice-recipient of the National Media Award by LULAC, America’s oldest and largest civil rights organizations for Latinos and a multiple Emmy-award winner at NBC TV for investigative stories on child predators, and consumer dangers.

 

(Wally Clark, Rick Cummings, R.J. Curtis, Joe Crummey, and Michael Crozier)

Cruz, Dennis: KKBT, 1991-99; KCMG, 1999-2000. Dennis worked at KIFR-San Francisco with John London until the spring of 2006.
Cruz, J: KPWR, 2011. J joined "Power 106" for nights from 'HOT 97.5,' KVEG-Las Vegas in late summer 2011.
Cruz, Kristin: KOST, 2008-14. Kristin was the co-host of the KOST morning show until May 2014. She started in October 2008.
Cruz, Rick: KKTR, 1998. Rick is with AirWatch Traffic Services.
Cruz, Suzy: SEE Suzanne Ansilio
Crystal, Ross: KFWB, 2001-14. Ross is an entertainment reporter.
Cuervo, Dan: KIIS, 1996-97. Sean Lynch, aka, Dan Cuervo works at Priority Records.
Cuett, Peter: KJOI, 1987-88. Unknown.
Culver, Howard: KLAC, 1965-69; KGIL, 1969-74. The former newsman started as a radio actor acting in the drama, "Straight Arrow." He had a recurring role as "Howie" on CBS/TV's Gunsmoke. Howard traveled to Hong Kong and contracted spinal meningitis. He died August 4, 1984, at the age of 66.
Cummings, Brian: KIIS, 1975-76. Brian went on to a voiceover career.
Cummings, Rick: KPWR, 1991-96. Rick is executive vp of programming for 25-station Emmis chain, concentrated in seven markets, including New York, Chicago, L.A., Phoenix, Denver, St. Louis and Indianapolis.
Cunha, Joanne: KFWB, KABC, KNX. Joanne was an account exec/sales manager at a number of all-News/Talk stations. She died December 5, 2010, at age 60.
Cunningham, Darby: KPPC, 1986. Unknown.
Cunningham, Keith: KACD, 1999-2000. Keith is head of his own consultancy company called Media Positioning. 

   

(Magic Christian, Bill Cooper, Chuck Clifford, and Roger Collins)

Curelop, Carey: KLOS, 1989-91; KQLZ, 1991-92; KLOS, 1992-97. Carey is program director at KZOK-Seattle.
Curran, Jim: KIIS/AM, 1978; KGOE, 1978-81; KSBR, 1997-2005. Jim worked at AirWatch traffic service until November 30, 2007 when there was a restructuring at the traffic/news facility. He's now an AE with Balboa Capital Corporation in Irvine.
Currier, Cam: KRLA, 1970-72; KROQ, 1972-74; KGIL, 1979-81; KIEV/KRLA, 1981-2005. Cam is doing occasional engineering at the ABC Radio Networks and freelancing at GreenStone Media. He's also doing media consulting for the San Gabriel Valley Council of Governments.
Curtis, Benson: KRHM, 1957-65; KBCA, 1973-76. Benson was the owner of KRHM and hosted "Strictly from Dixie" for many years. He has since passed away. A blogger wrote: "I practically grew up on Strictly From Dixie. Loved that show, and loved the version of Panama that he kicked off with. I was shocked and saddened one day to hear a clearly angry Benson Curtis announce that it was the last show as the station had kicked him off the air. That was the end of a very special bit of radio." 
Curtis, Craig: KPCC, 2005-13. Craig stepped down from his post as the pd at KPCC in early 2013.
Curtis, Jay: KBIG, 1999-2000. Jay worked swing at KBIG.

CURTIS, Mac: KLAC, 1971; KBBQ, 1971; KFI, 1973-74. Born in Fort Worth on January 16, 1939, Mac began playing guitar at the age of 12, entering local talent competitions. In high school he formed a band and in 1955 they were offered a deal with King Records. Their debut single, If I Had Me a Woman was heard by Alan Freed and the group was invited them to play on Freed's 1956 Christmas radio special.

Curtis returned to his hometown to finish school in 1957, and then became a dj in Seoul, Korea. Upon his return from the service in 1960, he continued work as a dj in the South and released a few albums. His 1968 release, The Sunshine Man, hit #35 on the U.S. Country albums chart. 

His rockabilly career took off in the 1980s and 1990s. He was later elected to the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

He died on September 16, 2013, following injuries received in a car accident.

Curtis, RJ.: KDUO, 1978-80; KLAC/KZLA, 1980-87 and 1993-96 and 2000-06. RJ is the Country music editor for AllAccess.com.
Curtis, Fred: KPOL, 1955-65. Fred is retired and living in Glendale.
Cutting, Dick: KFWB, 1968-70. Dick has passed away.


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