Where Are They Now?
LARadio.com
LA Radio People - W
Compiled by Don Barrett

db@thevine.net


W

W, Jeffrey: KEZY, 1986. Jeff is working morning drive (Jeff and Anna in the Morning) at KDMX (Mix 102.9)-Dallas.
Wachs, Larry: KLSX, 1995-97. As part of the "Regular Guys" talk team, Larry was working at WKLS-Atlanta until the Spring of 2004 when they were let go following the accidental airing of explicit language during a "backwards porno." He's now with WNNX-Atlanta and simulcast on WROK-Macon.   

WADE, Bill: KHJ, 1963 and 1968-74; KBRT, 1980-81, pd. Born in Los Angeles on October 11, Bill spent his radio career in California.

Bill worked for KHJ in 1963, KDEO and KGB-San Diego. In 1966 he was working at KFRC-San Francisco.

He returned to KHJ, when it was "Boss Radio," in 1968. In 1973, Bill worked morning drive while waiting for Charlie Van Dyke to join the station. He had a different guest dj every morning with superstars of the day like Dionne Warwick, Diana Ross, the Carpenters, Glen Campbell and the Osmonds.

In 1969 Bill ran the Bill Wade Broadcast School of Radio and Television. In 1975 Bill was the gm of KSOM-Ontario. Last heard he was teaching at Lampson Business College in Mesa, Arizona.

Wagman, Rob: KBBY, 2003-04; KYSR, 2004; KFSH, 2012-14. In addition to his role at AllAccess Music Group, Rob joined "Star 98.7" in early summer 2004 and left a few months later. He was programming WIBT-Charlotte until early 2009. Following a stint as apd/md at WXRK in New York, Rob joined KFSH in late 2012 for afternoon drive.
Wagner, Dave: KMZT, 2001. Dave joined "K-Mozart" as pd in March 2001.

WAGNER, Gary: KLON, 1992-2001; KKJZ, 2009-14. Gary the "Wagman" hosts 'Nothin' But the Blues' on K-JAZZ. “I first became interested in radio as a profession in about 1965. An L.A. teenager in the '60's, I grew up with KFWB and KHJ as my radio paradigm. The local rock 'n roll station in my hometown, Ontario, was KASK. Along with a couple of friends with similar interests, I started my own ‘bootleg’ station, which we called KEG. One friend built a 15-watt radio transmitter based on plans he modified from an article in Popular Electronics magazine. I built a four-channel mixer, and hooked up a couple of turntables made from Sears record players. Another friend donated a mike. We went on the air from my bedroom. For a couple of months, all the kids in the neighborhood were listening. After the FCC agents left, we set up a big audio amplifier where the transmitter had been, put a huge speaker on the roof of my parents' house, and began ‘audiocasting.’ Some of the adults living nearby were, shall we say, less than thrilled. So I started hanging around at KASK. I got to know the djs there and they let me run the board sometimes when the engineer needed to do something else. Then one day about a year later on a Sunday morning, one of the jocks didn't show up for his show."

"At the early age of 17, they let me go on the air and I have never looked back since," Gary continued. "After a stint in Southern California radio (KYMS, KACE and KNAC) I got drafted. As part of my Vietnam tour I worked at a 50,000-watt AM propaganda station. Upon discharge, I followed a radio career spanning the continent, including 5 years in Chicago, where at WJKL in 1979 I interviewed the great Muddy Waters. Upon returning to California to escape those cold winters, I spent a decade as a real estate broker in San Luis Obispo and Ventura counties. But I returned to my first occupational love, radio, to host ‘Nothin' But The Blues’ on KLON in 1992.” Gary owns MaxPacific, a Macintosh computer training and consulting firm. He left KLON (now KKJX) in May 2001. He returned to the Jazz station in2009 where he hosts "Nothing But the Blues.

Wagner, Jack: KNX, 1947; KGIL, 1951-52; KHJ, 1952-57; KBIQ, 1957-58; KHJ, 1958-62; KHJ/fm, 1967-68; KNX, 1968. Jack died June 16, 1995. He was 69.
Wagner, Mike: KEZY, 1974; KIIS, 1976-82; KRLA, 1984-94. Mike works for a real estate firm in Kingman, Arizona.
Wagner, Shelly: KABC, 1979-2009. Shelly was the marketing head at KABC until the cluster downsized in early 2009. She now works for the Dodgers organization.

(Rob Wagman, Dan Weiner, Nancy Wilson, Mitchell Whitfiled, and Van Earl Wright)

Wahl, Dick: KPOP, 1959; KNX, 1960s. Richard died August 18, 2001. Born in Bellingham, Washington, he graduated from Bellingham High School, attended Western Washington University and graduated from the University of Washington. He was active in drama at all three schools. Dick worked in Seattle at radio stations KOMO and KIRO and later moved to Los Angeles where he spent the next 20 years working as a news reporter and correspondent for American Broadcasting. After retirement Richard taught journalism at California State College, Northridge, inspiring a new generation with his respect for the principles of broadcast news. Dick portrayed a newscaster in the 1978 motion picture Remember My Name. Others in the film included Geraldine Chaplin, Anthony Perkins and Moses Gunn.
Wailin, Jon R.W.: KZLA, 1979-80. Jon lives in San Leandro and is doing airborne traffic reports for KGO-San Francisco.
Waite, Charles: KNX, 1968-69. Charles died of a brain tumor at a young age.
Walcoff, Rich: KORJ, 1979; KRLA, 1979-83; KIKF, 1983. Since 1985, Rich has been broadcasting sports on KGO-San Francisco.
Wald, Ronnie: KGIL, 1981-83; KGOE, 1982; KFOX; KTIE, KPRO, KRLA, KMNY, KWRM. 2011 marks 30th year in LA sportscasting. Since 2003, he has been Internet streaming at: waldcast.com.
Walden, Mike: KNX, 1966-69; KFI, 1970-73. Mike lives in Tarzana with his wife Nancy and has four grown children.
Waldow, Mitch: KFWB, 1984. Mitch works at UPN/Channel 13.
Walker, Adrienne: KOST, 1993-95. Adrienne is co-host of the syndicated "World Chart Show."
Walker, Glynnis: KFI, 1996-99. Glynnis left WAIT-Chicago in early fall of 2002. She has written six books.
Walker, John Lee: KIIS, 1977. Unknown.
Walker, Mike: KABC, 2005-08. Mike hosted an entertainment weekend program on KABC until early 2008.

WALKER, Rhett: KRLA, 1967. Born in New Zealand (his mother was American, his father was British), Rhett came to the U.S. at the height of the musical "British Invasion." A number of stations during this period attempted to bring in English accented jocks. Despite the fact he was a New Zealander, his unique accent was good enough for Top 40/KRLA in 1967, where he replaced Casey Kasem. Rhett died December 18, 2012, in Victoria, Australia.

Rhett was also a popular dj at KOL-Seattle and KFXM-San Bernardino. Rhett arrived at KRLA in 1967 and left within the year. He returned to Australia in the late 1960s, where he stayed for the rest of his career.

He held several higher education degrees in music. Rhett had high profile stints on AM radio and played a central role in the establishment of fm radio in Australia as the format consultant and first general manager for FOX FM Melbourne.

When he left radio he became a professor of Business at Latrobe University in Victoria.

"He was a programming legend," according to Bruce Corneil, an Australian pop culture historian. "And he WAS a brilliant programmer. He did very little on air work after he came back to Australia. Rhett became a reclusive figure in later years, severing all ties with his former life in major market radio ending his days in rural obscurity, which is, apparently, just how he wanted it."  (Thanks to Bill Earl for the artwork, http://classicdjradioscrapbook.blogspot.com)

Walker, Sky: see Dave Skyler
Wall, Kevin: KFI, 2006-07; KABC, 2008. Kevin was a fill-in talk show host at KFI. He worked afternoon drive at KXNT-Las Vegas until November 2014.
Wallace, Gerry: KFI, 1990-93. Gerry is married to KFI's Terri-Rae Elmer.
Wallace, Rick: KFWB, 1967-68 and 1971-76; KABC, 1976-78; KPOL/KZLA, 1978-80; KMPC, 1980-82. Rick was news director at KPOL and KMPC. Rick lives on Vashon Island, Washington where he is working on getting a Low Power FM license for Voice of Vashon. He's also volunteer manager of Vashon Emergency Operations Center and president of non-profit VashonBePrepared.

     

(Glynnis Walker and Geoff Witcher)

Wallach, Paul, KIEV, 1976-93. Paul died May 26, 2002, of cancer.
Wallengren, Mark: KOST, 1985-2014. Mark has co-hosted the morning show with Kim Amidon and Kristin Cruz at KOST. In 2014, he began the program solo.
Wallin, Fred: KIEV, 1976; KGOE, 1978-79; KPRZ, 1981-82; KWNK, 1985; KFOX, 1982-87; KABC, 1988-89; KMPC, 1992-93; KIEV, 1995; KWNK, 1996; KIIS/AM, 1997. Fred hosts a sports talk show in Ventura. He is does Sports Overnight America for Sports Byline.
Walrond, Zoe: KPCC, 1991-94; KABC, 1996; KFWB, 1998-2006. Zoe is teaching news writing and reporting in the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication at Humboldt State University. 
Walsh, Chuck: KFWB, 1968-79; KABC, 1979-93. One report has Chuck living in the South Seas as a beachcomber.

WALSH, George: KNX, 1952-86. George died December 5, 2005, at the age of 88. He was a veteran with KNX from 1952-86. “When I was growing up in Cleveland in the 1930s, radio was magic. It was like being an astronaut today,” George told me when he was interviewed for Los Angeles Radio People.

After high school graduation he joined the local steel mill and worked church socials at night. World War II broke out and George enlisted in the Army Air Corps and served for four years. “I froze in Munich and decided that when I got out I wasn’t going to return to the Cleveland cold.”   

In 1946 George became pd of KSWS-Roswell, New Mexico and stayed five years. In 1952 he decided to return to school for more education and enrolled in the Don Martin School of Broadcasting in Hollywood. On May 26, 1952, KNX offered a part-time job of vacation relief at $100 a week. He stayed 34 years.   

George was the announcer on Gunsmoke for three decades (10 years on radio and 20 on television). “By 1986 I was ready to retire. I had had a prostate cancer operation and a heart pacemaker installed.” George lived in Monterey Park where he phoned stories into KNX for many years after his retirement.

Walter, Lisa Ann: KFI, 2011-14. The actress, comedienne, writer and television series creator and executive producer started on KFI weekends in late spring of 2011. She left KFI in late summer of 2014.
Walton, Cynthia: KNOB; KFOX. Cynthia is a part-time actress and is married to former KWIZ dj Johnny Lewis (Reeder).
Wamsley, Bill: KLAC, 1971; KFOX, 1971-72. Bill retired in the summer of 2001. He's enjoying his two passions - flying and photography.
Waples, Alvin John: KGFJ, 1972-77; KJLH, 1984; KGFJ/KKTT, 1984; KACE. Alvin left WMMJ ("Magic 102.3")-Washington, DC in the early summer of 2010 when the entire staff was let go and the station automated.

WARD, Bill: KBLA/KBBQ, 1967-70; KLAC, 1972-79; KMPC, 1982-93; KLIT/KSCA, 1993-97.  Bill was a radio pioneer bringing Country music to prominence with the personality-driven KLAC. He also forged a place for NASCAR broadcasts. If it wasn’t for Bill, there might never have been an AAA format in this market. Bill died July 30, 2004, of an apparent heart attack. He was 65.

Born on January 29, 1939 in Italy, Texas and raised there as well, Bill’s childhood hero was Gene Autry. Forty-three years later Bill went to work for Gene as President of Golden West Broadcasters. Whotta’ arch to one's professional journey.

His first radio job at age 15 was in Waxahachie, a few miles from his hometown. He got an FCC 1st Class Radio License and did the all-night shift at WRR-Dallas while attending the University of Texas at Arlington in the late 1950s. Bill went to Gordon McLendon's WAKY-Louisville in 1959 to do the morning show and in 1962 moved to evenings at WPRO-Providence. His first programming job was at WPLO-Atlanta while doing mornings. Bill moved to KBOX-Dallas in late 1964 as morning man and became program director in 1966. KBOX switched format to Country music in January 1967. In March 1967, he joined KBLA as pd and changed the call letters to KBBQ and the format to Country music. He became station manager in 1970.  

Bill was hired by Metromedia in the late summer of 1971 to program KLAC and within a year was promoted to general manager. In 1979 he was promoted to exec/vp of Metromedia and moved to New York. By the spring of 1980 he was elevated to president.  

He left Metromedia in the spring of 1982 and moved back to Los Angeles as president of Golden West Broadcasters, where he became manager of KMPC, in addition to his duties as president of the company. In 1985, Bill bought KUTE for Golden West, and the station adopted a Soft AC format with the call letters KLIT. Bill orchestrated the format change of 101.9/fm to KSCA, Los Angeles' first AAA station.

Ward, Cameron: KALI, 1996-2000; KLOS, 1998-2009. Cameron is an Marriage Family Therapist in the San Fernando Valley.
Ward, Mike: KMPC. Mike is an anchor/reporter at news/talk KFBK-Sacramento.

 

(Richard Wahl, Lisa Ann Walter, and JoJo Wright) 

WARD, Paul: KGBS, 1967-69; KFI, 1969-70; KOST, 1970-71; KBIG, 1971-72; KOST, 1973. Paul went on to program KEZS-Sacramento, KFRC-San Francisco, and WROR-Boston. Paul passed away October 27, 2009. He was 68 years old.

“Except for radio he was a Street Car fan and has traveled the world collecting and taking pictures,” said his former wife, Ans. 

Paul was born in Oak Park, Illinois, and he grew up in San Francisco. “I think I got the radio bug when my mom came home with a Dictaphone machine around 1953, and I produced many fine radio shows on it, including ‘Dragnet’ and ‘The Cisco Kid,’” said Paul when interviewed for Los Angeles Radio People. After a year at Georgetown University, Paul announced to his family that he was abandoning law for radio and was thrown out of the house. His first radio job was at KBLA. “I am one of the few people in radio today, who can still show scars from changing 78rpm soft steel needles every second record.”

He jocked at KVFM, but wasn’t paid. He answered an ad in Broadcasting (“Great radio positions for men who loved to hunt and fish, and enjoyed skiing, which meant that it was a terrible place to have to live.”) and ended up in Show Low, Arizona, the city named by the turn of a card, for $125 a week. The job didn’t last long and Paul returned to the Bay Area and went back to school and worked part-time at KPEN (later K101).

His journey took him to Truckee, Santa Rosa and Hawaii and Australia and New Zealand. Following his Southern California stay, Paul moved on to Sacramento, KFRC-San Francisco and WROR-Boston and then became head of Audio Stimulation, Wolfman Jack’s company.

Paul owned Far West Communications and was doing five formats on CD, and a service called MASTERDISC, which provided hard to find bits on custom CD for about 400 stations around the world. He was marketed outside of the U.S. by Radio Express. He also spent about three months a year in South Africa, consulting three Urban AC stations. He was president/ceo at Far West until his death.

Ward, Rick: KDAY, 1962; KBLA, 1965; KIEV, 1973; XPRS/XERB, 1973-75; KALI. Rick lives in Little Rock, Arkansas and he is heard on RockitRadio.net.
Ward, William: KNX, 1958-62. William died December 13, 1996, at the age of 76.
Ware, Ciji: KABC, 1977-93. Ciji has written two historical novels, one titled Island of the Swans. She also does voiceover work.

WARFEL, Lynne: KFAC, 1983-86 and 1987-89. Classical music icon Carl Princi hired Lynn on the fact that she was an ex-actor and classically trained singer. "Thai’s all the credentials Carl  needed," said Lynn. "I wasn’t afraid to talk and I could pronounce (at least somewhat) German, French and Italian. His Italian was more than perfect if that were possible."
 

After KFAC, she filled in for Jim Svjeda at KUSC and then left for Scotland where she worked in Rock at Radio Forth in Edinburgh. "In 1991, WCAL in Northfield at St. Olaf College hired me back into the Classical world and soon after, in 1993, Minnesota Public Radio hired me. Currently I am a host on their national Classical service C-24 and you can even catch me in LA on KUSC EARLY Saturday and Sunday mornings. My background before radio was in theater."

Lynn graduated from Northwestern University with a degree in theater and music. She came to LA in 1978 where she did bit parts in various and sundry tv shows and films, (Rockford Files, Mommie Dearest, and Rich and Famous) and then attended and graduated from Fuller Seminary in Pasadena.  While at Fuller Carl hired her as KFAC’s first female announcer.  "I returned to KFAC with my husband, Tony Holt, until leaving for Scotland.

Warlin, Jim: KPSA, 1972; KEZM, 1973; KJOI, 1975-79; KNOB, 1980; KMPC, 1980-81. Jim owns an insurance brokerage firm and is the "Love Doctor" on KEZN-Palm Springs.

 

(Charlie Weir, Dave Williams, Jim Warlin, Donald West, and Rod West)

Warne, Steve: KLAC, 1993. Unknown.
Warren, Bob: KGBS, 1970-74. The former announcer for the Lawrence Welk Show and This Is Your Life. Bob May 21, 2013, in Bend, Oregon. He was 93.

WARWICK, Stan: KXLA, 1957; KMPC, 1957; KLAC, 1957-64; KGIL, 1964-92, gm. "Your whole life changes after a stroke. I'm lucky I can still walk and drive but I can't write." That's the way Stan started a  phone conversation in the spring of 1996 from his home on the Central California coast. He spent three decades with Buckley Communications, holding every job within KGIL (dj, newscaster, director of news, pd in 1967 and, finally, gm). He was the Announcer of the Year in 1961.

From 1969 until KGIL was sold, Stan was the vp of West Coast operations at Buckley Communications.

He was born in Tekoa, Washington and graduated from Washington State College with a degree in communications a few years after Edward R. Murrow went through the same program. Stan suffered two strokes in 1995. One side of his brain was affected. Every Thursday, five men in the Morro Bay area who have had recent strokes gathered for group physical and emotional therapy. “I am thankful that the stroke was not worse and that I am able to get around.”

Stan died November 2, 2004 after a number of years of failing health.

WASHBURNE, Jim: KRLA, 1961-63. In 1966, Jim fell asleep at the wheel of his car coming home from a weekend in Big Sur and died in the automobile accident.

Jim came to KRLA as the Pasadena outlet's pd and afternoon drive jock. Some of his best remembered on-air references included calling the L.A. basin the "Washbasin" and saying "..but isn't it quiet when the goldfish die?"

During his short two-year reign, Jim brought Emperor Bob Hudson to the station. In 1963, Jim left everything for San Francisco and KYA.

Wassil, Aly: KABC, 1972. Unknown.
Waters, Lou: KFWB, 1968. Lou was a news anchor at CNN.

 

(Johnny Wendell, Christian Wheel, and Rick Ward)

Watkins, Chick: KMPC, 1987-88; KGIL, 1998-2000. Chick worked at the Adult Standards format at Dial-Global for over a quarter of a century. He left in late spring of 2012 after a company downsizing.
Watson, Bill: KHJ, 1972-73; KIQQ, 1973-74; KMPC, 1975-78 and 1982-87. The former Drake-Chenault national pd used to split his time between Carlsbad and Rosarita Beach. "If you're looking for me, I'll be in the first row, dead center shady side at the Tijuana bullring every season Sunday at 4."
Watson, Rich: KUTE, 1982-87; KOCM, 1988-89; KJOI, 1989; KLIT, 1989-90; KIKF, 1990; KACD, 1992-98. Rich is the entertainment director at Knotts Berry Farm..
Watson, Tom: KKDJ, 1972; KJLL, 2009. Tom was the operations manager of Amaturo's JILL/fm stations until late 2009.

WAY, Art: XTRA, 1958-61. Art passed away on March 25, 2008 of a heart attack. He was 76. Art jocked at the flame-thrower Top 40 station from just below the border at XEAK (690 AM) in the 1950s and early ‘60s. Art was also a popular air personality at Crowell-Collier's KDWB-Minneapolis, sister-station to KFWB.  

During the infamous KFWB strike in August 1961, KFWB needed several KDWB jocks to substitute on KFWB, according to Dream House author Bill Earl. “Because Art had already been heard by Southern California listeners from his days on 690 AM, right before he joined KDWB earlier in 1961, it was a shocker the Way was passed over to be a KFWB substitute jock by KDWB brass. KDWB instead sent its two popular drive-timers Hal Murray (6 – 9 a.m.) and Bobby Dale (3 – 6 p.m.) to jock on Channel 98 during the KFWB strike, leaving the more "familiar" Art Way BACK in Minnesota.”

After leaving KDWB, Way was also heard on San Diego's 136/KGB, right before the 1964 flip to the "KGBeach Boys" Drake-format. Only Bill Wade made the "cut" from pre-Drake KGB, again passing over Art, who left KGB in April 1964 upon the start of the KGBeach Boys format. 

Wayman, Ric: KUCI, 1978-79; KOCM, 1978. Ric, also known as Ric Stratton, is sales manager at KBCB/TV-Bellingham, Washington.
Wayman, Tom: KMPC, 1962-81. Unknown.
Wayne, Bill: KZLA, 1983. Unknown
Wayne, Bruce: KFI/KOST, 1968-86. Bruce died in a plane crash on June 4, 1986.

     

(Bill Watson, Jack Wagner, and Michael Wilbon)

Wayne, Darrell: KEZY, 1972-74; KAGB, 1975; KHNY, 1975; KROQ, 1976-81. "Insane Darrell Wayne" Wampler buried disco albums at the beach as part of a disco funeral. Darrell lives in Ventura, edited LARadio.com, works part time and fill-in at KVTA and owns KTHO-AM in South Lake Tahoe.
Wayne, David: KGER, KWVE. Dave hosts and produces the Saturday Morning Kids Show using the on-air name of 'K-Dave.'
Wayne, Sid: KBLA, 1965. Unknown.
Weatherly, Kevin: KROQ, 1993-2012; JACK/fm, 2005-12; KAMP, 2009-12. Kevin is senior vp of programming for CBS Radio and vp of programming for KROQ, JACK/fm, and AMP RADIO.  
Weaver, Beau: KHJ, 1975-76; KRTH, 1990-94. Beau is the voice of Entertainment Tonight.

WEAVER, Bill: KWIZ, 1964-90, vp/gm. Bill was responsible for the very successful Oldies all-Request format that dominated the Orange County ratings for many years as well "You Pick the Hits" and "Yes/No Radio" in San Jose, Seattle, Fresno, and San Francisco. He created one of the first male-female morning teams with Buddy & Fran in addition to an all-female FM air staff, and sales staff.

Born in Brooklyn New York in 1918, Bill 's family moved to Los Angeles in 1928. His first job at Ralphs grocery store, after graduating from Marshall High School. He served in the Navy during World War II, he attended Ventura Junior College. After attending radio school in Los Angeles, his first radio job was at KGFL-Roswell, New Mexico followed by KBST-Big Springs, Texas.

Unable to lose his New York accent, Bill returned to California, working for the Ventura Star Free Press. In 1951 he remarried and they opened an advertising agency in

Ventura called Weaver Saucier and Associates. A year later, Bill moved to Sacramento and joined the sales staff of KROY. Bill found the programming related to his sales so he then began creating the "weaver sound."

Bill left KROY and jumped crosstown to KXOA only to return with ownership in Sacramento Broadcasters and KROY. He also owned an ad agency in Sacramento called Media Scope. In 1964 he moved his family to Orange County and started rhw Voice of the Orange Empire, KWIZ AM & FM with a format consisting of "instant requests, and voting."

Weaver added additional stations KLOK-San Jose, KUUU-Seattle, KARM/KFIG AM & FM-Fresno - KLOK/fm-San Francisco. "My father very rarely if ever took vacations he loved what he did, and he looked forward to going into the station each day," wrote his daughter Patrice. "It was never work for him, it was a love. He ate, slept and lived radio. He was that rare person who gave so many people the chance in radio. It was always exciting to be around him." Bill passed away in January 1990. In 2013, he was inducted into the Bay Area Radio Museum.

Weaver, Bill: KPOL, 1967-70. Bill was the second CapCities general manager at KPOL. Unknown.
Weaver, Hank: KLAC, 1957-61. Hank was a sportscaster in the 50s and 60s and he was replaced at KLAC by Jim Healy. He was in an automobile accident in the early 1960s on his way home from a boxing match at Dodger Stadium. Hank was eventually taken to Stanford University Medical Center and died several weeks later.
Webb, Larry: KRLA, 1965-75. When Larry left his general manager post at KRLA, he joined the staff of FCC Commissioner Robert T. Lee.

WEBER, George: KMPC/KABC, 1993-95. George was murdered in his New York apartment March 20, 2009. For more than a decade after leaving 710/KMPC, George was the morning news anchor at news/talk, WABC-New York. He was 47. His blog provides some insight into George Weber: 

"As a kid growing up in Philadelphia, I was always fascinated by radio ...so much so I took over the basement of my parent’s home to set up a make-shift radio station. I even did a tv show but, in reality, I just created a set and talked into a tape recorder. 

In high school, after a grueling audition, pronouncing words like Versailles and not ‘ver-sallies’ and Grand Prix and not ‘pricks,’ I spent a few years at WCSD in Warminster, Pa. Unlike my basement set-up, this was a non-commercial fm radio station, one of only two licensed to schools in the United States. 

While still in high school, I talked my way into a job at a day-time only radio station in nearby Doylestown, PA – WBUX.  I remember going into the boss’ office, after three years at WBUX and asking for a raise. He whipped off his glasses, and while shaking them at me said ‘if you want to make more money, leave.’ 

I did. I spent two and a half great years at WAEB in Allentown, PA reporting and anchoring the news and making some great friends in the city where they're closing all the factories down, as Billy Joel sings to us. I still have my audition tape that I sent to Phil Boyce, the news director at KIMN in Denver, a legendary Top 40 radio station with a big commitment to news. I was hired as a street reporter and anchor in 1985 and to this day, KIMN [it’s pronounced KIM] remains one of my greatest career moves. I was offered jobs in Atlanta, Sacramento and imagine, Buffalo at about the same time. 

Sadly, two and a half years after my arrival, the music died. KIMN’s call letters vanished and it became a Country radio station - leaving many of us without jobs. Luckily, Kris Olinger, now a good friend, remembered how – while covering a fire – I walked a good 50 feet before realizing I was dragging my microphone on the ground behind me. She hired me at KOA in Denver, a 50-thousand watt clear channel radio station heard in 38 states at night. Originally, I was hired as a reporter, but ended my career there doing a highly rated night time talk show. That launched my talk career. 

  irst stop, KGO in San Francisco, where I split my time between talk and news - and never got to experience a big earthquake. I arrived a year too late for the ’89 quake. What didn’t go over so well here was    my weekend talk show, which the general manager thought was a little too racy. I was asked to stay on in the news department, but decided instead to go to KOGO, a newly re-formatted talk station in San Diego. Less than a year later, management decided it couldn’t afford the cost of running such an expensive format. I was fired, but spent the next six months [thanks to a nice severance deal] sitting on the beach. 

Unfortunately, I spent too much time relaxing and not enough time looking for a job, that I actually considered getting a roommate to share my loft in downtown San Diego. As luck would have it, I ended up picking up some cash doing weekends in Los Angeles at KMPC, which was attempting to do a hot-talk format. I actually had a blast doing shows there, but then an old friend came calling. 

They hadn’t forgotten about me in Denver and so – I was invited back by the same company at a brand new talk station, KTLK. Never before have I had so much fun doing a radio talk show. This was the kind of radio I liked, controversial, upbeat and a little edgy. Unfortunately, ‘Real Talk Radio’ as they called it was about to be blown-up for a new talk format. 

Just in time, the biggest radio station in the world called – wondering if I’d like to do news on WABC in New York. I said yes – and a few weeks later – I was living in the West Village and talking on the radio.

Weber, Pete: KRLA/KIIS/KPRZ, 1978-81. The former color commentator for the Los Angeles Kings is the play-by-play voice of NHL's Nashville Predators on Fox Sports Tennessee and WGFX ("The Zone").

 

(Zoe Walrond, Rick Williams, and Rich Walcoff) 

WEED, Gene: KFWB, 1958-68; KLAC, 1971. Born in 1935, Gene started in Texas radio when he was 17 years old and attended North Texas State University. He went on to work in Dallas, Omaha and Miami before joining KFWB.

The "Weedy One" worked weekends at KFWB at the age of 23 while assigned to Armed Forces Radio and Television Service in Hollywood. In early 1961, Gene was made assistant pd to Jim Hawthorne. He moved to afternoon drive in 1961. Except for a month during the infamous personality strike in 1961, Gene stayed with the station until the very end, on March 10, 1968, having worked every shift.

In 1966, he was voted top all-night dj in Billboard magazine's Radio Response Ratings. He created the nationally syndicated Shivaree tv rock show, which ran for three years and aired in more than 150 markets and seven countries overseas. He produced and directed over 200 of the mini-movies for recording artists such as Glen Campbell, The Fifth Dimension, Creedence Clearwater and Debbie Boone. He has produced and directed over 300 tv commercials and numerous industrial and sales presentations.

As senior vp of television at dick clark productions (dcp), Gene developed, produced and directed major television series, specials and annual events. Each year he produced and/or directed the Golden Globe Awards, The Academy of Country Music Awards, The Soap Opera Digest Awards and the Sea World/Busch Gardens Party. In the early 1990s, Gene produced and directed the Hot Country Nights series for NBC, which continues to air on The Nashville Network. His other specials include Farm Aid III and IV, The Golden Globes 50th Anniversary Special, The Lou Rawls Parade of Stars and Prime Time Country nightly on TNN. He also directed the three-hour LiveAid concert for ABC. His work as a producer/director earned him two first place awards for creative excellence at the International Film Festival in Chicago. A spokesman at dcp said, "Gene was one of the foundational posts here."

Fellow KFWB dj Jimmy O'Neill was "shocked" to learn of Gene's death. "I hadn't seen Gene for 30 years when we ran into each other about five years ago. I was struck by his kindness. He could not have been nicer." Gene died of lung cancer on August 5, 1999, at the age of 64.

   

(Gabriel Wisdom, Cynthia Walton, and Brian Whitman)

Weed, Steve: KIIS, 1977-80; KHTZ, 1980. Steve is station manager at KDND-Sacramento.
Weiner, Dan: KXTA, 2000-04; KTWV, 2004-07; KTWV/KNX/KRTH, 2007-09. Dan left his position as head of the CBS/LA cluster in March 2009 to join Fox Interactive Media. He's now vp/sales for the Western Region of Pandora.
Weiner, Len: KMPC, 1992-93. Len is program director for all-Sports WAXY AM&FM ("The Ticket") in Miami. 
Weintraub, Roberta: KMPC, 1981-82. The former Los Angeles school board member and president is an activist.
Weir, Charlie: KUSC, 1999-2001. Charlie worked all-night at Classical KUSC.
Weiss, Dave: KEZY, 1990-98; KXTA, 1998-2001; XTRA Sports/KLAC, 2001-12. Dave, on-air known as DC Williams, is the promotions and marketing director at all-Sports KLAC.
Weiss, Jonathan: KNX, 2006-07; KKJZ, 2006-07. Jonathan broadcasts traffic and he had a weekend shift at all-Jazz KKJZ.
Weissman, Sharon: KLON, 1982-94. Sharon runs the Richard and Karen Carpenter Performing Arts Center in Long Beach.
Welch, Clarence: KDAY, 1965. Unknown.
Welch, Cliff: KMPC. The fill-in pilot/reporter for KMPC died in 1999.
Weldon, Steve: KLAC, 1985-87. Steve works at WSM-Nashville.

WELLES, Dara: KNX/fm, 1976-79; KRTH, 1979-80, nd. Dara was born and raised in Milwaukee. "I attended Nicolet High School, where a girl a year behind me did pretty well in broadcasting. Her name was Oprah Winfrey."

Dara developed an interest in radio at the college station at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She was a music major and performed as a singer, but was always intrigued by the news department. She hung out and learned to edit copy.

"I moved to L.A. after graduation to be with my boyfriend. We broke up, but I got my first radio job at KNX/fm." From 1979 to 1987, Dara was an anchor and correspondent for NBC's youth radio network, "The Source." In the late 1980s, she was a host on NBC's syndicated advice radio net "TalkNet." She went on to host shows on WNYC and WABC-New York. The former WOR-NY newswoman is now with Cablevision and Sirius/XM Radio. 

Wells, Don: KMPC, 1961-72; KFWB, 1972-87. Don was part of the original broadcast team for the Angels. Don died October 3, 2002, in Switzerland after a long illness. He was 79.

WELLS, Jack: KABC, 1963-67. Jack was a talk show host at KABC for four years in the 1960s. He died June 27, 2010, from complications of a stroke at a Los Angeles nursing home. He was 86. He was a pioneering broadcaster who hosted Baltimore's first morning tv show. Jack created and hosted an LA tv show on KHJ/Channel 9, called The Age of Aquarius. Wells decided to go into radio during World War II, when he served in Europe as an Army radio operator with Chuck Thompson, who went on the become a legendary Baltimore Orioles announcer. Wells also did voiceovers and guest starred on shows such as Days of Our Lives, The Young and the Restless and General Hospital.

Wells, Pam: KACE, 1987-89. Pam works at "Majic 102"-Houston.
Wells, Paul: KMET, 1986; KNAC, 1986-88. Paul hosts a syndicated show, "Lobster's Rock Box."
Wells, Sandy: KABC, 1998-2014. Sandy works at Radiate Media.
Wells, Scott: KLON, 1983-2000. Scott left KLON in early 2000. Scott teaches foreign language and has been nominated for Disney's "Teacher of the Year" award.
Welsh, Pat: KROQ, 1979-84; KACD, 1995-96. Pat is a professional golfer.
Wendell, Bruce: KDAY, 1960; KBLA, 1967. The longtime Capitol Records executive and baseball fanatic in the mid-1990s joined Rotations promotion and marketing firm.

 

(Bruce Wayne, Bradley Wright, and Tom Watson)

Wendell, Johnny: KFI, 2002-04; KTLK, 2005-13. Johnny, also known as Johnny Angel when he writes for the LA Weekly, hosts "Southern California Live With Johnny Wendell" every Sunday at 4 p.m. plus fill-in on the Progressive station.
Wendi
: KIIS, 1990-96; KZLA, 1998-2001. The former Miller Genuine Draft poster girl moved to mornings at KZLA in the fall of 1999 and to middays in the Spring of 2000. She left the station in the fall of 2001. She's now at Country KSCS-Dallas.
Wennersten, Robert: KFAC, 1985-90; KKGO, 1991-96 and 1998-99. Robert was program director at Classical KKGO. He is now retired and living in St. Joseph, Missouri.
Werndl, Bill: XTRA, 1996-2001. Bill was part of XX Sports Radio 1090AM in San Diego until late 2008
Werth, Paul: KRHM; KVFM; KNOB, KNAC, KFAC. Paul was a knowledgeable, creative musical documentarian. On the KNOB his program was called "Werth Listening To." He brought Bing Crosby back to live performances with a concert at the Music Center. His career began in the 1950s in New York, where he produced concert performances for Harry Belafonte, the Weavers, Woody Guthrie, the Modern Jazz Quartet and Stan Getz. He moved in 1957 to the Southland where he produced concerts and theater shows for Dinah Washington, Herbie Mann and others. Paul produced many radio specials including "This Is Steve Allen" and "Johnny Green's World of Music." In 1972 Paul received a Billboard Air Personality award while working at KFAC. He wrote and directed the Leukemia Society radiothons for many years. Paul created an audio history of Harry Truman titled "A Journey to Independence." In 1992 he adapted and produced Neil Simon's Sunshine Boys as the first in a series of Mark Taper Forum Theater of the Air radio programs. Paul died on December 20, 1996, of cancer. He was 69.

 
   

(Chick Watkins, Chuck Walsh, Cameron Ward, and Hamilton Williams) 

WESHNER, Skip: KRHM, 1957-64 and 1966-71; KNAC, 1972-74; KPFK, 1981; KFAC, 1973-79 and 1983-84. Born August 10, 1927, Skip hosted KFAC’s “Man for All Music” show introducing many people to the music of Latin America, as well as people like But & Travis, Hoyt Axton, Gordon Lightfoot, Joni Mitchell. Many of these artists singled out their interviews with Skip as being one of the highlights of their career.

He was married to Lynne Taylor of The Rooftop Sings (Walk Right In), who died in 1979. Frank Blau, president of Blau Systems has reels and reels of “his amazing eclectic shows. He was a dear friend and a true presence in Los Angeles radio.”

Before he arrived in the Southland, Skip had a show on WBAI and WNCN in New York called “Accent on Sound.” This was the first "folk music" show heard in New York City.  Blind musician Josť Feliciano was probably first heard on Weshner's show. During the first session, Feliciano accidentally fell down the stairs of Weshner's duplex apartment.   Weshner often broadcast from Greenwich Village, including The Bitter End on Bleecker Street and the Cafe Feenjon on MacDougal Street. At the New York Hi-Fi Show at the New Yorker Hotel, around 1963, Weshner's live broadcast included the then relatively unknown Bob Dylan.

He died in 1995.

Wesley, Jim: KFI, 1973-80. Jim is president/ceo of Patterson Broadcasting and he is living in Atlanta.
West, Andy: KHJ, 1963. Andy died of cancer on April 3, 1975 in Reno. Andy gained national fame for his vivid description of the shooting and struggle with Sirhan Sirhan following the killing of Robert Kennedy at the Ambassador Hotel.
West, Bert: KNX, late 1950s; KRLA, 1980-84. Bert is retired and living in Palm Springs.
West, Charlie: KLOS, 1987-89, pd. Charlie died October 23, 2004.
West, Donald: KROQ, 1975-78. Donald has been practicing law in Orlando since the early 1980s.
West, Gene: KIQQ, 1972-73; KGFJ, 1975-76. Gene is a Secondary Assistant Principal for Los Angeles Unified School District.
West, Joe: KNX, 1992-95; KMPC/KTZN/KABC, 1994-98. Joe's HEREontheWeb program is heard on KNX. He lives in Palm Springs.
West, Mark: KIIS, 1979. Unknown.

WEST, Phyllis: KIIS, 1984-85; KLSX, 1985-87; KNAC, 1987. During the 1980s, Phyllis Weixelbaum West worked at KIIS, KLSX and KNAC. She died March 27, 2007, at the age of 44. Phyllis was born on Long Island and grew up in Atlanta and attended George State University. She started her broadcast career in 1980 at WRAS. Before arriving in the Southland she worked at WFOX-Gainesville, Georgia and WQXI-Atlanta. At KIIS she was  “Big Ron” O’Brien’s producer. In 1987 Phyllis was the co-host (with Fraser Smith) of WTBS’ Night Tracks. When she left L.A. she went on to do mornings at KAFE and KXFX-Santa Rosa, promotion director at KUFX-San Jose, KCDU-Salinas and Metro Networks at KGO-San Francisco. Phyllis was also morning host and promotion/marketing director at Alternative rocker KMBY-Monterey.  

Since 2003, Phyllis was working at WIMZ-Knoxville. Terry Gillingham, general manager for South Central Radio in Knoxville, said Phyllis had been ill since the summer of 2006. She was diagnosed with a rare form of muscular cancer. She stopped appearing on the air in September 2006 and sought treatment at Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. "It's a terrible loss," said Gillingham, who first worked with West at KMBY. "She was a very compelling and interesting woman. She was extremely intelligent and she loved to say things just to get a reaction. She had a much greater impact than any of us realized. People have called and told us how much she really touched them."

West, Randy: KMGG, 1983-87. Randy is the fill-in announcer on The Price Is Right and is the announcer on the traveling Price Is Right stage show.
West, Rick: KWIZ, 1976-78. Rick is vp of marketing and planning at a Southern California company.
West, Rod: KZLA, 1984-85; KIIS, 1985; KSUR, 2004-05. Rod worked morning drive at Oldies "K-Surf" until a format change in the Spring of 2005.

(Bob Warren and Bo Woods)

West, Roland: KNAC, 1983-85; KROQ, 1986. Roland now works in San Francisco for the Island Def Jam Music Group.
West, Scott: KIKF, 1984; KCRW 1996-99; KOLA, 1998-2000. Scott works all-nights at the Inland Empire Oldies station, KOLA.
West, Sonny: KWIZ, 1980-82. Sonny, who worked as Greg Panattoni at KWIZ, is the morning man at KyXy in San Diego.
Westgate, Murray: KPOL, 1963-69. Murray is an independent entrepreneur with business interests in the Far East.
Westheimer, Dr. Ruth: KFI, 1983-84. Dr. Ruth lectures on sexual issues.
Westman, Dick: KLAC, 1959-60. Unknown.
Westwood, Denise: KNAC, 1977-80; KROQ, 1980-82; KMET, 1982-86; KNX/fm, 1986-89; KEDG, 1989; KLIT, 1990; KLOS, 2000-14. Denise spent a decade during the 90s working in San Diego radio. Since 2000, she has been working weekends and fill-in at KLOS.
Wexler, Paul: KOST; KWST. Paul was the voice of God in the movie Ten Commandments. He died of leukemia in the mid-1980s.
Whatley, Susanne: KHJ, 1981-85; KFI, 1986-2001; KLAC, 2001-02; KFWB, 2002-09; KPCC, 2010-14. Susanne left her anchor chair at KFWB following a format flip in September 2009. She is a news anchor at KPCC.
Wheatley, Bill: KRLA, 1959; KFWB, 1965-66. Bill passed away in Broward County, Florida in the mid-1990s.
Wheel, Christian: KIIS, 1998-2005; KBIG, 2005-09; KRTH, 2010-14; KFWB, 2011-14. Christian worked weekends at MY/fm until a Clear Channel downsizing in the spring of 2009. He hosted Let's Talk Tech at KFWB until a format flip in September 2014. He did fill-in at K-EARTH until September 2014.

 

(Kevin Weatherly, Rich Watson, and Bill Wright)

Wheeler, Mark: KMDY, 1986-89; KNJO, 1989-96; KSCA, 1996-97; KRTH, 1997-2002. Mark reports traffic for a number of Southland radio stations including KRTH and KRLA and news at KLON/KKJZ.
Whelihan, Kelly: KFWB, 1992-2009. Kelly was a news editor at all-News KFWB until mid-2009.
Whitcomb, Ian: KIEV, 1977-80; KROQ, 1980-84; KCRW, 1986-91; KPCC, 1991-96. Ian, who burst on the music scene in 1965 with the Top 10 hit, You Turn Me On, has a show on Sirius/XM Satellite radio.
White, Brian: KREL, 1970-71; KDAY, 1976-77; KIIS, 1977. Brian is operations director and afternoon jock at Oldies WKOO-Jacksonville, North Carolina.
White, Dave: KCBS, 1993-96. Dave is working in Detroit radio.
White, Jack: KJLH, 1965-67. Last heard, Jack was living in Colorado.
White, Jamie: KYSR, 1998-2006. Jamie was part of the morning team of "Jamie, Frosty & Frank" at "Star 98.7" until September 15, 1999, when Danny Bonaduce joined her for a two-person team. Danny left in the summer of 2005 and she was teamed with Mike Roberts (Stench) and Jack Heine until late 2006. She's now working mornings at "Alice" in Denver.
White, Wood: KDAY, 1987. Unknown.
Whitesides, Barbara: KPOL, 1978; KNNS; KFI, 1980-93; KFWB, 1996. Barbara is teaching at Palomar College, near San Diego.
Whitfield, Mitchell: KMPC, 2003-05. Mitchell was part of the morning show at all-Sports 1540 The Ticket.
Whitlock, Mark: KFI, 1990. The African American talk show host whereabouts is unknown.
Whitman, Brian: KIIS, 1994-2005; KABC, 2000-05; KLSX, 2005-08; KRLA, 2012-14. Brian partnered with Tim Conway, Jr. at KLSX for the Conway & Whitman nightly show until leaving in March 2008. Brian's comedy bits appear on various morning shows. He's now co-anchor of the morning show at KRLA 870AM.
Whitman, Don: KXLA, 1957. Unknown.

 

(Mark Wallengren, Janine Wolf, and Ciji Ware)

Whitney, April: KROQ, 1980-92; KEZY, 1993-97. Spril has an event production company and has returned to school to work on her Masters in psychology. She would like to be a radio psychologist.
Whittaker, Debbii: KGFJ, 1993-94. Debbii changed her air name in 2001 to Toni Terrell. After stops in Colorado and Texas, she is now the apd and an air talent at WHRP-Huntsville, Alabama.
Whittaker, Gary: KBBQ. Gary works at KHMO-Hannibal, Missouri.

WHITTINGHILL, Dick: KIEV, KGFJ, KMPC, 1950-79. For three decades on KMPC, every morning Southern Californians were "Whittinghilled." In the 1950s and 1960s, KMPC was "The Station of the Stars" - the personification of MOR radio - and Dick Whittinghill was the #1 star in the galaxy. He died January 24, 2001, following complications from colon surgery. He was 87.

In the 1940s, Dick was a singer with The Pied Pipers, a vocal ensemble from the Big Band years that sang with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra. He was born March 5, 1913, and began his radio career in his hometown at KPFA-Helena, Montana, making a stop in Denver before arriving in the Southland to work at KIEV and at KGFJ. He then had an incredible quarter of a century with Gene Autry's KMPC, beginning in 1950. His old morning rival Bob Crane said it best: "Whittinghill has likability." He was described as steady, honest and faithful to his audience. Crane continued, "Whit's a flag-waver. He likes golf and booze. He says so on the air and he's completely honest and likable."

On his 25th anniversary, Dick commented: "What I'm doing is basically the same format that I've used since 1954. We'll go with an instrumental, a boy vocal, then a girl vocal, up tempo...you just can't play the same type of music constantly." What he did do constantly was an hourly "Story Record," in which Dick told a joke that was punctuated by the lyrics from a song. His engineer, Hal Bender, did bg and voices for Dick. Part of his morning ritual was his breakfast break during a half-hour newscast, when he would leave the station and walk two blocks down Sunset Boulevard to Norm's, where a plate was already prepared with a hamburger patty and tomato slices. His morning team included traffic reporter Paul "Panther" Pierce, Herb Green, Dave DeSoto, John McElhinney and news director Tom Wayman. In 1957, Dick was co-chairman of the high-profile Southern California Heart Fund drive. Dick never made any bones about why he loved radio.

In an LA Times profile, he said he enjoyed the money and did the morning show because "it's more money and I can get away early for golf every day." He hung out daily at the Lakeside Golf Club in Toluca Lake. "The disc jockey," he once said, "is the lowest rung on the show business ladder. There's no talent required for this whatsoever. Believe me. I should know, I've been doing it long enough." In a 1978 interview, Dick said, "I don't believe in ratings and surveys. The way you know you're doing well is to look at your log; if you have a bunch of commercials in there, you know you'll be back the next day." He valued the friendships with his sponsors and advertisers: "I play golf with some of the fellows. Cadillac has been with me about the longest." Dick made a commitment to never tease the sponsors. His show had something for everyone. He had a number of trademark features that his audience could always count on: soap opera lampoons of "Helen Trump," "On This Day in History," and he ended the show with a minute or so of an instrumental.

When he retired from the morning show on KMPC in 1979, he said, "You keep saying to yourself that it has to happen sometime but when you finally make up your mind, it becomes kind of scary. I'm perfectly reconciled to the fact that I've been here long enough and have nothing more to prove." In 1976, he wrote his best-selling autobiography (with Don Page) Did You Whittinghill This Morning? He was immortalized in the Hollywood Wax Museum. In 1982, Dick went to KPRZ and got to sleep in by working afternoon drive. The "Music of Your Life" format was eventually abandoned and the station was renamed KIIS/AM. "The real tragedy was not my leaving the air but rather the city's loss of one more good music station." Dick was featured in hundreds of tv shows and movies. Whittinghill summed up his journey: "I just stumble through life."

Whittington, Dick: KNOB, 1960-62; KLAC, 1960-63; KGIL, 1965-79 and 1985; KABC, 1966-68; KFI, 1975-77; KIEV, 1982 and 1988; KHJ, 1983; KABC, 1989-90; KMPC 1990-91; KNJO, 1994-95. Dick is living on the Central California Coast and writing a novel.

   

(April Winchell, Jamie White, Cliff Winston, William F. Williams, and Mike Walker)

Wickstrom, John: KWOW, 1974. Unknown.
Wiggins, E.Z.: KACE, 1977-2000. E.Z. worked evenings at KACE until an ownership change in 2000.

WILBRAHAM, Craig: KKBT, 1991-99. Craig passed away August 15, 2010, at the age of 63.  Craig was vp/gm at KKBT (92.3/fm, ‘The BEAT’) for much of the 90s. In 2000, Craig worked for Premiere Traffic Network. Most recently he was the western sales manager for XM Satellite until the company merged with Sirius. 

Born and raised in Detroit, he served his country as a Marine in Vietnam. Upon returning from the war he completed his bachelor degree at Oakland University and went on to a successful career in broadcast management. Craig got his start in 1977 as an Account Executive for Christal Radio in Detroit and was promoted to run their Chicago operation shortly thereafter. He then spent time as the general manager for FM-100 in Chicago before moving on to Barnstable Broadcasting in Boston as a vp.

Wilbo [as his friends knew him] took special pleasure in witnessing the success and growth of the many appreciative individuals he mentored and tutored over the years.

Wilberding, Jason: KTWV, 2000-04; SBS, 2004-08. Jason joined Spanish Broadcasting System as vp/DOS in late Spring 2004 and became vp of sales at English/Spanish KXOL. In 2009, he joined Premiere Networks as vp of sales.  
Wilbon, Michael: KSPN, 2007-09. Michael hosts PTI (Pardon the Interruption) with Tony Kornheiser at ESPN.

WILCOX, Brent: KCRW, 1980s. Brent died unexpectedly in Girdwood, Alaska on February 20, 2012. He was 55.

Brent was born in Pasadena, and grew up in Rancho Santa Fe. He attended La Jolla Country Day School, The Choate School in Wallingford, Connecticut and graduated with honors from the film school at UCLA. He loved to write and he loved music but most of all he loved sharing his special perspectives and special musical selections on public radio.

Brent’s passion for public radio led to over 30 years on air and fans worldwide. His first show was in Los Angeles on KCRW with his show FRGK (Funny Rock God Knows), then moving to Cambria, California, he took his fans to “Dreamland” in San Luis Obispo. For the last 11 years, Brent shared his love for world music, progressive and alternative rock, avant-garde, and experimental music with his extended family at Girdwood’s independent radio station KEUL. His radio show “Smoke and Mirrors” aired every Sunday from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. He was also the station’s Jazz music director.

He moved to Alaska and started working at Alyeska Resort in 2001 as a doorman. He was quickly tapped to be a reservationist where he moved up the ranks over the years. Brent was promoted to Revenue Manager in the fall of 2009 where he has been a critical part of the hotel’s pricing and forecasting team.

Adept with technology platforms and complex hospitality booking systems, Brent worked hand-in-hand with a variety of hotel departments in establishing sound practices and policies for hotel rates, packages and overall guest service.

Wilcox, Margaret Kerry: KKLA, 1992-2004. Margaret hosted a number of weekend shows at Christian KKLA.
Wilde, Rita: KEZY, 1978-82; KLOS, 1983-2009; KSWD, 2011-14. Rita left her post as program director at KLOS in early 2009. She now works evenings at 100.3/The Sound.
Wilder, Chuck: XTRA, 1971; KIEV, 1971-2000; KRLA, 2001; KPLS, 2001-03; KSPA, 2005-07. Chuck produced the George Putnam Show, heard at KSPA and Cable Radio Network, for decades. Chuck hosts the CRN show solo.
Wildman, Diane: KMET, 1973. She went on to KPFK.

WILEY, Marcellus: KSPN, 2011-14. The former NFL star and ESPN analyst joined Max Kellerman to form the “Max & Marcellus” show to air weekdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Their show launched 1.24.11.  

A native of Southern California, Wiley attended St. Monica High in Santa Monica, where he was an academically and athletically honored student. Wiley, like his co-host Kellerman, is a graduate of Columbia University.  

A 10-year NFL veteran, Wiley played for four teams during his career, including Buffalo Bills (1997-2000), San Diego Chargers (2001-03), Dallas Cowboys (2004) and Jacksonville Jaguars (2005-06).  Wiley was also voted to the Pro Bowl and was named one of Pro Football Weekly’s Top 50 Players in the NFL.

After the NFL, Wiley turned to broadcasting as an NFL commentator for ESPN. He has appeared on ESPN programs such as First Take, NFL Live, SportsCenter and ESPNEWS and served as contributing analyst for ESPN’s Super Bowl coverage. In addition, Marcellus co-hosts Winners Bracket, with Michelle Beadle, on ABC.  

“I feel like I've just been signed to the Dream Team and we have home court advantage throughout the Olympics,” said Wiley. “L.A., get ready - your son is back!” 

“I am excited to team Max and Marcellus together,” said Mike Thompson, KSPN pd. “Marcellus will bring a unique and well-rounded perspective that very few broadcasters could provide – as a scholar, professional athlete and native Southern Californian. Max and Marcellus’ humor and insider knowledge, on both a local and national level, will engage and connect with our fans.” 

In 2012, he appeared on Millionaire Matchmaker.

Wilkinson, Bud: KSUR, 2003. Bud hosted "Broadway's Biggest Hits" on "K-Surf." His show is syndicated around the county.
Willard, Mark: KMPC, 2003-07; KSPN, 2008-14. Mark was part of the morning sports show at KMPC 1540/The Ticket until the spring of 2007 when the station was sold to Radio Korea.He left the midday show with Mychal Thompson at KSPN in late summer of 2014.

WILLES, Ray: KGIL, 1966; KBIG/KBRT, 1968-77.  Ray was pd at KOIL-Omaha, worked at WHK-Cleveland, KISN-Portland, and KDEO-San Diego before arriving in Southern California in 1966 to work at KGIL. In the mid-70s he teamed with Gary Gray in morning drive at KBIG. Ray went on to a very active VO career and he was the voice of the Barbara Walters Specials for well over a decade. He retired in 1999, but his voice was heard periodically over the years on commercials. “I first met Ray when I was 15 years old,” said KRTH’s Shotgun Tom Kelly.

“Ray was one of my mentors. He used to cut voice tracks on Saturday afternoons and let me run the board at KDEO while he was in the production room. Ray was always good to me and we became great friends. Ray was one of the first people to call me and congratulate me when I got the job at K-Earth 101 in 1997. Ray will be missed by many of his colleagues and friends in the Los Angeles community.Ray died February 23, 2010 at the age of 74.

Williams, Brad LaRay: KACE, 1981-87; KKGO/KKJZ/KJQI/KNNS, 1989-97; KKJZ, 2007-11. Brad works mornings at all-Jazz, KKJZ.
Williams, Charlie: KFOX, 1960-72. Charlie moved to Nashville and built a home on a lake. He managed Bobby Bare and hosted a talk show on WSIX. Charlie passed away in 1995.

(Dr. Ruth Westheimer, Don Wells, Bill Werndl, and Randy West)

Williams, Dave: KRTH, 1973; KABC, 2000-01; KNX, 2002; KFWB, 2002-03; KNX, 2004-08; KABC, 2009-10. Dave was the morning drive co-news anchor at all-News KNX until late 2008. He went on to afternoon news anchor at KABC and left in the summer of 2010. He's now a news anchor at KLIF-Dallas.
Williams, DC: KEZY, 1994. SEE Dave Weiss.
Williams, Dudley: KGIL, 1966-70. Unknown.

WILLIAMS, Eric: KFWB, 1972-2009. Eric, veteran of all-News KFWB from 1972 until his retirement in 2009, passed away June 11, 2014. He was diagnosed with stomach cancer in 2010 and apparently it had spread to his brain. He was 69.

Eric was unemployed for a year before joining KFWB, but went on to celebrate over three decades with the all-News operation. 

Born in Marblehead, Massachusetts, Eric grew up in Salem. “My father worked at WBZ-Boston for 20 years and he would take me to the station to watch him work.” 

Eric studied journalism at El Camino Junior College and San Jose State. At San Jose State he could waive an internship if he secured a full-time job. He walked into KXRX-San Jose in 1966 and was offered a job as a news reporter. A year later he joined San Jose’s KNTV/TV, where he worked in the news department for five years. 

“In 1970 I got caught in the recession and the station laid off half of the 18 person news team.” Eric would leave the Bay Area and land in Southern California. At KFWB, Eric covered several national disasters and commercial airliner crashes. “During the MidEast War I wrote hours and hours of copy.”

Williams, Gary: KKGO, 1994-97. Gary left radio and became a movie actor in Bruno, starring Sasha Baron Cohen and Inspector Morse, starring John Thaw. He is a full-time writer, a television host, and he's developing a pilot for a talk show on the paranormal. Gary lives in Los Angeles.
Williams, Hamilton: KCBH, 1966; KFAC. Hamilton died June 30, 2006. He was 83.
Williams, Hugh: KFWB, KGFJ. Hugh earned an Emmy for his work on AM Los Angeles at KABC/tv. Hugh died August 6, 1994. He was 63.
Williams, J. Otis: KKJZ, 2006, J. Otis works weekends at the all-Jazz station.
Williams, Jeff: KABC, 1974-76; KTNQ, 1978-79; KFWB, 1982-84; KIIS, 1984-87; KTNQ/KLVE, 1993-2006. Jeff is head of research at the Spanish stations.
Williams, Johnny: KRLA, 1965; KHJ, 1965-74. Johnny lives in Hawaii and hosts premiere radio Web site, 440int.com.

(Darrell Wayne, Mike Wagner, Pam Wells, and Jamie Worlds)

Williams, Keith: KLSX, 1998. Unknown.
Williams, Larry: KUTE, 1973-76. Unknown.
Williams, Laurie: KSCA, 1994-97. Laurie is working for a radio syndication company.
Williams, Morgan: KGFJ; KBCA; KRLA; KFI/KOST; KBIG, 1984-98. Morgan worked at KBIG for 13 years and passed away in her Mid-Wilshire home after a short but difficult battle with lung cancer on July 17, 1999. Born Morgan Hendricks on February 29, she was first heard in the 1950s as Margi, sidekick to Hunter Hancock at KGFJ. "Hunter thought his name was so unusual and not many women were named Morgan, so I became Margi," Morgan told me when I interviewed her for my book, Los Angeles Radio People. A graduate of William and Mary University, Morgan worked in media across the country. In the 1960s, she was a news reporter at KABC/Channel 7, and KHJ/Channel 9 (now called KCAL-TV). In the '70s she had a long stint with KFI radio covering news and public affairs. In the '80s and '90s, she was public affairs director at KBIG, where she was known for her unique and intimately styled weekly long-form interviews on "The Big Picture." Morgan married the lead singer of the Platters, Tony Williams. Her love affair with radio began with a love for her grandfather. "When I was three or four I would sit at my grandfather’s feet and listen to the radio news with him. I would say ‘Papa Charlie what does the man mean?’ And he would answer me like a grownup. He said if I was old enough to ask the questions, I was entitled to an answer. He never told me to hush." Morgan ended my interview with the following that seems somewhat appropriate: "I have truly been blessed in this life." She was 67.

   

(Ian Whitcomb, Rita Wilde, Gary Williams, and Debbii Whittaker)

Williams, Rick: KACE, 1970-71; KNAC, 1977, KSCA, 1994. Rick is the A&R supervisor at DCC Compact Discs in L.A.
Williams, Travis: KACE, 1970-71; KTBT/KORJ/KDIG, 1971-76; KOCM, 1974 and 1976-77. Since 1996, Travis has been a regulatory affairs analyst with the County of Los Angeles.
Williams, Verne: KABC, KFWB, KFI. Verne was one of the original anchors when KFWB went all-News. Born in New York, he grew up in Texas and Massachusetts. He started out on WESX-Salem, Massachusetts and later spent two decades with WBZ-Boston. Verne’s son Eric has been with KFWB for 25 years. When Verne left the Southland in 1971 he moved to Sacramento and San Francisco. While he was in the Bay Area Verne was the executive assistant to the mayor of San Francisco. Verne passed away in 1992.
Williams, Vince: KFWB, 1968-70. Unknown.

WILLIAMS, Warren: KNX/fm, 1987-88; KLSX, 1991-96, pd. Warren died February 21, 2010, of a heart attack. He was 54. "It could have been an aneurism in the heart, but the doctors aren’t sure because there wasn’t any particular stress with Warren,” said his wife, Kim. 

Warren arrived for his first visit in the Southland from KSRR/KKHT-Houston for morning drive at KNX/fm. He left in 1988 to program WOFX-Cincinnati and returned to the Southland in 1991 to be assistant pd at KLSX, later becoming pd in 1994.

Born June 13, 1955, in Nyack, New York, Warren graduated from Penn State University with a B.A. in speech communication. While doing post-graduate work, he produced Coach Joe Paterno’s pre-game show that aired on the 80-station Penn State Football Network. In 1981 he programmed KATT-Oklahoma City and three years later became pd of KDKB-Phoenix, which is where Kim and Warren met. Warren had an active production company that was responsible for the writing and production of all radio advertising for Fox Sports in the mid-90s and he created the national radio launch campaign for the conversion of Prime Sports to Fox Sports Net. He worked for Larry Kahn with Sports Radio Network and was the voice and did the production.  He was also the voice talent for Sinclair Broadcast Group for many of their Fox TV stations around the country. 

Williams, William F.: KDAY, 1960; KBLA, 1965-67; KBBQ, 1966-67; KRLA, 1968-69; KPPC, 1971-72. Since 1984 William has been living and writing in the mountains.

WILLIS, Scott: KLON, 1992-2002/KKJZ, 2002-07. Scott hosted "Mostly Bop" weekend show at the Jazz station and he was music director until the spring of 2007 when there was a management change.

Scott Willis has over a quarter of a century experience as a broadcaster in commercial, non-commercial, and Internet radio working as a program director, music director, producer and host. He is currently music director of several online radio channels and can be heard hosting jazz programs as part of the in-flight entertainment for domestic and international airlines as well. Twice nominated as jazz personality of the year by Gavin magazine, he has been an industry panelist and moderator at numerous jazz conferences including Jazz Times, Jazz Week, and the International Association of Jazz Education.

Scott has also been heard on the air as a contributor to NPR's Morning Edition, News & Notes, and at NPRMusic.org, and has been the senior producer and host for several national broadcasts including the annual Playboy Jazz Festival and the prestigious Monterey Jazz Festival. Over the years, his interest in the history and stories behind the music he loves has led him to create a number of unique programs, including most recently "Talkin' Jazz with Scott Willis," a syndicated jazz feature program launched in the Spring of 2007 and carried on over 30 stations nationwide during its time in production.

As a music supervisor, Scott has worked on independent film and television commercials for several production companies. He continues to be called on as a consultant for jazz documentaries, film soundtracks, reissue recordings, and archival holdings.

Wills, Maury: KABC. Maury, a former star with the LA Dodgers and host of SportsTalk at KABC, lives in the South Bay. He has a role in the Legends program within the Dodger organization.

   

(Beau Weaver, "Sweet Dick" Whittington, and Roberta Weintraub)

Wilson, Andy: KRHM, 1966; KPPC, 1966-68. Unknown.
Wilson, Bob: KDAY, 1969-72. The former owner of R&R was involved for a time with the syndication of Wolfman Jack.

WILSON, George: KIQQ, 1980-85. Born George Wilson Crowell on July 18, 1929, in Katonah, New York, he made his marketing presence felt with the Bartell chain. George, starting out as a professional baseball player, became a sports announcer and then a disc jockey in the 1950’s. He died April 10, 2013 of complications from a heart attack two weeks earlier.

George was pd of WOKY-Milwaukee. In the early 1970s he was gm of WDRQ-Detroit. In a multi-part interview in Billboard in 1975, George, as the executive vp of Bartell Media's radio division commented: "Chuck Blore was always kind of like my hero. He used to have phenomenally great ideas and I would just find out what he was going to do next week, then I'd do it."

George has since moved to Albuquerque.  As a broadcast executive with Bartell Broadcasting and the Starr group of stations he was twice honored as National Program Director and named by his peers as Radio Executive of the Year. George served as station manager, President and board member of major radio broadcast groups. He served on the Nominating Committee of the "Hit Parade" Hall of Fame and opearted "George Wilson's Memory Tunes" website.

Wilson, Marina: KOCM, 1988; KIKF, 1990-92; KEZY, 1992-96; KLIT, 1992-94; KOST, 1995-96; KACD, 1996; KZLA, 1996-2001; KFSH, 2000-03; KRTH, 2006; KOLA, 2003-10; KTWV, 2010-14; KMZT, 2014. Marina worked weekends at KOLA in the Inland Empire until July 2010 when she joined weekends at "The WAVE." She is now doing full-in at K-MOZART.
Wilson, Mark: KLYY, 1999. Mark started mornings at "Y107" in the spring of 1999 and left in late 1999 following a format switch to Spanish.
Wilson, Nancy: KTWV, 1987-95; KLON, 1997. Nancy is living in Pasadena and doing voiceover and sudying acting at Actors Improv Studio- teacher, Bill Applebaum.
Wilson, Scotty: KNAC, 1984-88; KIIS, 1993-94. Scotty has been working for Hard Radio.

WILSON, Warren: KABC, 1965-68; KFWB, 1968-70. Warren was a longtime reporter for KTLA/Channel 5. He retired in 2005, after 21 years at KTLA.

He is well known for brokering the surrenders of some 22 fugitives during his many years on the beat. During his tenure at KTLA, Wilson’s scoops included interviewing Rodney King in 1991, just days after King was beaten by L.A. police officers in a videotaped incident that helped spark riots in the city the following year. In March 1993 alone, two suspects involved in unrelated incidents contacted Wilson to arrange their surrenders. One was a 14-year-old boy wanted for questioning in a murder case who told Wilson that he reached out to the reporter because of his “reputation for honesty.”

He joined KTLA in September of 1984 as a part-time field reporter for the station’s Prime News. Prior to coming to KTLA/WB, he held various senior journalist positions for 15 years with KNBC and NBC Television News. He received fifteen Emmy nominations. In 2005 Wilson received two Associated Press Television-Radio Association Awards for Best Live Coverage of a News Event and Best Spot News Story. His citations include: Most Responsible Reporter in Southern California from former Los Angeles Police Department Chief Daryl Gates, and he has received commendations from various community organizations, state legislature, county supervisors, the City Council of Los Angeles, Mayor Tom Bradley, schools and many women’s organizations. He won a Peabody Award as part of team coverage of the Rodney King beating case, and in 2002 was honored as broadcast journalist of the year by the Society of Professional Journalists.

His extensive education has earned him a L.L.B. Degree from West Los Angeles School of Law; a B. A. degree in Political Science from the California State University and an A. A. Degree in Journalism from East Los Angeles College. He has majored in News Film at Columbia University’s Special School of Telecommunications in New York and in Political Science at UCLA. He taught Radio/TV News Writing at California State University, Los Angeles.

WIMAN, Al: KFWB, 1959-66; KLAC, 1966-69. Al had three incredible journeys reporting news in Southern California. He was at KFWB during the Chuck Blore/Jim Hawthorne rock years, the Joe Pyne talk era at KLAC and the early stages of the successful KABC/Channel 7 Eyewitness News. While at KFWB in 1964, Al narrated The Beatles' Story album for Capitol Records. 

"I was at the Charles Manson murder site with my cameraman and sound engineer. We found the bloody clothes on a hillside six minutes and 20 seconds away from Sharon Tate's house. We got in the news van and traveled down Benedict Canyon. I was undressing in the station wagon and when I put on new clothes we stopped the station wagon. We hiked down the hillside and found the bloody clothes. The detectives were flabbergasted. We filmed it but didn't touch the pile of clothes," said Al when being interviewed for Los Angeles Radio People. He was referenced in the Manson book and tv movie, Helter Skelter.

Al joined KFWB doing traffic reports while he was in the Navy. Civilians were running Armed Forces Radio and were jealous of Al's involvement with KFWB so they shipped him out on the U.S.S. Topeka, a guided missile cruiser. "I took music on the ship along with a jingle package. We must have been the only ship with a set of jingles."

Al grew up in Laurel, Mississippi, and was the medicine and science editor for KMOV/TV-St. Louis for decades. When a photo of Al was requested from KMOV/TV, the marketing manager Mary Westermeyer wrote the following unsolicited words about Al: "Al is extremely humble and will never pat himself on the back. He's an outstanding reporter, St. Louisan, husband and father, but foremost he's an incredible human being. Al personally gives back to the community more than any other talent with the station. He has an impeccable reputation within the St. Louis medical community. Al has a terrific wit, caring attitude and he's adored in the community." Al has moved to KSDK/TV in St. Louis.

Winchell, April: KFI, 2000-02; KABC, 2003-04. April left KFI at the end of 2002 and she appears frequently with Marc Germain on TalkRadioOne.com.
Windsor, Natalie: KMGX, 1990. Natalie covers the country music beat for AP Radio Network.
Winesett, Barry: KRLA, 1984-92. Barry is doing post-production for several syndicated radio shows including The Dr. Demento Show.
Wingert, Wally: KTWV, 1987-2001. Wally is a national voiceover talent.
Winnaman, John: KLOS, 1974-79. The gm of the AOR station died on the baseball field during a KLOS promotional game.

 

(Bob Wilson, Denise Westwood, Chuck Wilder, and Darrell Winrich)

Winrich, Darrell: KABC, 1968-85. Darrell is retired and splits his time between Coeur d'Alene, Idaho and Dana Point. 
Winslow, Harlan: KMET, 1975-76; KMPC/fm/KEDG, 1988-89. Harlan is semi-retired and living in Northern California.
Winslow, Michael: KODJ, 1989. Michael is sound effects actor in the Police Academy series.
Winston, Cliff: KJLH, 1986-90; KKBT, 1990-93; KJLH, 1993-2006; KKBT/KRBV, 2006-08. Cliff worked mornings at KRBV (V-100) until Radio-One sold the station to Bonneville in April 2008.
Winston, Kari Johnson: KBIG, 1978-82 and 1985-95. Kari is president of Bonneville's Washington, DC radio division.
Winston, Robert: Robert is vp/gm at Metro Networks/Shadow Broadcast Services. The former national sales manager at KFI went on to KFWB and eventually he became vp of sales for AM/FM, Inc.
Winter, Pat: KFWB, 1971-75. Pat was a writer, editor and broadcast reporter for KFWB.
Wisdom
, Gabriel: XHIS/XHRS, 1972; KLSX, 1999-2009. Since 1997, he has hosted or co-hosted Financial Wisdom with Gabriel Wisdom heard nationally on the affiliates of The Business Talk Radio Network. He owns American Money Management.

(Jeff Wyatt, Len Weiner, Sandy Wells, and Gene West)

Wisk, Al: KMPC, 1978-79. The former LA Ram broadcaster is an attorney practicing in Dallas.
Witcher, Geoff: KGIL, 1969-70; KABC, 1975-83; KMPC, 1992-94; KABC, 1995-97; KIIS/KXTA, 1998-99; KFWB, 2000-02; KLAC, 2001; KNX, 2012-13. Geoff is a longtime radio sports figure and was part of the Angels post-game game show. He now is one of the sports anchors at all-News, KNX.
Witherspoon, Jimmy: KMET. The blues singer died of natural causes on September 18, 1997. He was 74.
Wittenberg, Dave: KLYY, 1999. Dave worked evenings at "Y107" with Harrison until late 1999 when the station changed to Spanish.
Wolf, Janine: KHJ, 1980-84; KHTZ, 1985; KNX/fm, 1988-89; KODJ, 1989-90; KBIG, 1993-97; KZLA, 1998-99; KBIG, 2000-01. Janine works middays at KIJZ-Portland.
Wolfe, Gerald: KLSX, 1998-99. Gerald was part of the weekend "Ken and Jerry's Countdown Deli" show.
Wolfson, George: KXEZ, 1995. The former general manager at KXEZ. George passed away in 1998.
Wolt, Ken: KTNQ/KLVE, 1985-92. Ken is president of Radio/TV travel, an incentive travel company specializing in sales incentive plans for the broadcast industry, and is headquartered in Incline Village, Nevada (Lake Tahoe).
Wong, Al: KYPA, 1996. The former general manager of KYPA. Unknown.

   

(April Whitney, David Wayne, Dave Wagner, Marina Wilson, and George Weber)

WOOD, Jim: KBLA, 1965; KGFJ, 1966-67; KRLA, 1967-68; KGFJ, 1970-72; KROQ, 1972; KGFJ, 1978-79; XPRS, 1982-83. Tyler, Texas-born "Big Jim Wood" spent time on black-formatted stations and was referred to as a blue-eyed soul personality on KGFJ. At KRLA he was known as "The Vanilla Gorilla." The latter off-air reference was dubbed during his KGFJ days when Jim was one of two white jocks on the r&b station.

He was given the Billboard Leading Soul Music Air Personality award at the first annual ceremony in 1970 and for the next three years. He worked at KILT-Houston and WIBG-Philadelphia. Jim died at the age of 58 in 1990.

At the time of his death he was a security guard and was suffering from emphysema. One of his friends remembered, "Jim was in the hospital and got a cough drop stuck in his throat and he choked to death."

Wood, Jim: KPOL/KZLA, 1979-80. In 1995, Jim created Fan Club Management Services, a company that manages the fan clubs of recording artists and other "fan sensitive" groups.
Woods, Bo: KRTH, 2002-06. Bo worked swing at Oldies "K-Earth" and left in early 2006. In late 2014, Bo joined KORA in Bryan-College Station, Texas as program director and morning personality. 
Woods, David: KPOL, 1965-70. Unknown.
Woods, George: KJOI, 1973. George is no longer in radio. Unknown.
Woods, J. Thomas: KWIZ, 1971. Tom ran for the California Assembly and won two terms (1994-98). He is now a retired Assemblyman living in Upland. 

WOODS, Steve: KDAY, 1974-85, pd; KJLH, 1985-89, pd; KACE, 1989-90, pd; KBIG, 1993-96. Steve did of a heart attack on Decmeber 9, 2002. He was 51.

At KDAY Steve was color man for the high school games of the week. Steve hosted the “KOOL Jazz Festival.” A 1989 LA Times story quoted Steve: "The identity of black radio is based on playing music by black djs." 

At his memorial, KJLH's Cliff Winston remembered “Steve Woods never got the kudos. Colleague Antoinette Russell added, “Steve introduced Parliament and Earth, Wind and Fire to the Southland. And he should be remembered for raising the pay scale for black jocks.” 

Over 100 family friends and radio colleagues joined together at the Christ The Good Shepard Episcopal Church in Los Angeles to remember a friend. Jim Maddox, who hired Steve at KDAY in the 1970s, said that Steve “stood out. He was so personable, but serious. Steve was a star on AM radio.”  

Born Clarence Steven Woods in Los Angeles on February 1, 1951, he explored his showmanship at Hollywood High School, as well as his athleticism. He was an outstanding member of the track team and varsity football program. After graduating from Hollywood High, he worked in the mailroom at KHJ in the early 1970s. He went on to jock in Lubbock and Dallas before joining KDAY in 1974. Later, he was named pd, a position he also held at KJLH and KACE.    

Antoinette guessed that if Steve had not pursued radio, he would have been chief of police. He did serve as a reserve Los Angeles police officer and paramedic during the 1980s. The versatile performer also owned a pistachio farm near Las Vegas.  

Woods, Tom: KPOL, 1965-69; KFWB, 1969-86. Tom was at California State University, Los Angeles from 1989-2005 where he was editor of Business Forum, a refereed business journal produced by the campus' College of Business and Economics. He is retired and lives in Lucerne Valley.

WOODMAN, Steve: KFWB, 1965; KDAY, 1968. Steve, a veteran radio and television personality described as "a living performance," died in his sleep March 13, 1990. He was 62.

Steve never got into the starting line-up at "Channel 98" and always worked weekends. At KDAY he did morning drive as Woody Stevens.  Woodman was known across Canada as Dr. Bundolo on the popular CBC radio comedy program of the same name. In Vancouver, he was well known as the afternoon host on radio station CKWX.  

Gene Kern, a longtime friend and colleague of Woodman in the 1970s, said his original satires and voice impressions were outstanding. "He was the most memorable and talented performer I ever worked with," Kern recalled. "The guy was a living performance, and was 10 or 15 years ahead of his time."

In the early days of his career in the 1960's, comedian Rich Little contacted Woodman at a Montreal radio station to get advice on doing impressions, said Kern. Among Woodman's funniest routines, he said, was a continuing character he voiced on his radio program named Miss Juggs, the station coffee girl.   "Sometimes he would scold her and she would burst into tears, lighting up the telephone switchboard with calls from listeners asking him to leave her alone.” The comedy program, taped before live audiences and broadcast across Canada, ran from 1972 to 1981. Woodman was involved with the show until 1974.

Woodman had also previously worked in Edmonton, Montreal, Toronto, New York and Los Angeles. He also managed rock and roll bands and played host to various children's tv shows. Woodman's career ended when he suffered a major head injury - causing him to lose his speech -- in a 1974 car accident while he was driving home after a telethon. A colleague said Woodman never recovered. "He was in a coma for a long time. His car just rolled down the bank. But a cassette tape of his friends was played again and again in the hospital and one day he woke up.  After a couple of major operations, Woodman was able to resume some activities such as golf.  

Steve started at CKUA in Edmonton and actually taught Robert Goulet how to be a disc jockey. Steve became #1 in Montreal at CFCF, did a morning show in Toronto CKEY with Keith Rich.   Woodman and Rich subsequently did the after noon radio show on WNBC-New York ... starting the same day Johnny Carson did.    Then went to Los Angeles, where he did a couple of movies, some radio and tv and was the first Ronald MacDonald in Los Angeles, opening toy stores and MacDonald restaurants. (Artwork courtesy of Bill Earl)

Woodruf, Fred: KLON, 1975-78. Unknown.

 

(Johnny Williams, Rick Wallace, EZ Wiggins, and Mitch Waldow)

Woodside, Larry: KROQ, 1980-81; KLOS. Larry is a car salesman.
Woodson, Valerie: KRLA, 1975-76; KTNQ, 1977-79. Unknown.
Woolery, Chuck: KLSX, 1996. Chuck hosted tv's Love Connection for 11 years.
Workman, Martin: KFAC, 1976-87. Martin hosted "Luncheon at the Music Center." He has performed as a professional violinist, a singer of light opera and oratorio and as an actor. Martin holds degrees in economics, sociology and a doctorate in abnormal psychology. In 1979 he suffered a heart attack but was back on the air after two months of rest. Martin died in 1990.
Worlds, Jamie: KOST, 1990; KACE, 1990-91; KKBT, 1992-93; KTWV, 1994-2003. Jamie was a weekender at "the Wave" until early summer 2003. She's working on multiple tv and film projects.

WORTHINGTON, Cal: KXLA, 1950-59. They don’t make them like Calvin Coolidge (Cal) Worthington anymore. For decades he broke through the clutter of commercials to become a personality, an icon who sold cars to the masses and would make the deal no matter what it took. We saw him stand on his head, trot out live animals of various sizes and shapes, and then like lemmings, we would go see Cal.

Cal died September 8, 2013, at the age of 92. An era passed with the passing of Cal.  The ultimate showman, some might call huckster, had an uncanny knack for being welcomed into our homes. He seemed like the ‘aw shucks’ kind of uncle that we loved to have around. When he said he could get anyone into one of his cars, we believed him.

He had a life before the car business. He was a Country music deejay for most of the 1950s at 1110/KXLA. “I remember listening to Tennessee Ernie Ford, Cliffie Stone, Jim Hawthorne and Squeekin' Deacon while growing up in Southern California as a kid, but wasn't aware of Cal being on KXLA until I helped produce the thirty year anniversary weekend at KRLA in 1989,” remembered Gary Marshall, former production whiz at KRLA and K-EARTH. “Cal participated in our re-creation as the last voice heard on the old Country format (KXLA) before the switch to KRLA and rock jock Jimmy O'Neill.”

Cal used to sign off his Country show with: "Well, until we see you at Worthington Dodge today or get back with you on KXLA, we're gonna have to pick a wildwood flower bouquet."

 

WORTHINGTON, Diane: KABC, 1989-95. Long considered an expert on California and contemporary American cuisine, Diane Rossen Worthington is the author of 20 cookbooks, an award-winning radio show host, food and travel writer, nationally syndicated columnist for Tribune Media Services, food and travel correspondent on the syndicated Blue Lifestyle radio show and former Editor-in-Chief of Epicurus.com. and food consultant. She has appeared frequently as a media food expert on television and radio shows, including The Today Show, Fox and Friends, The Television Food Network, CNN, and NPR. She twice won the prestigious International James Beard Award for "California Foods with Diane Worthington," the talk show she hosted which aired every Saturday morning on KABC. Diane Rossen Worthington lives in Los Angeles.

.

   

(Mark Wheeler, Wendi, and Fred Wallin)

Worthington, Rod: KDAY. In the early 1970s Rod broadcast traffic conditions from a Cesna 150. His plane was dubbed "The KDAY Sky Potato."
Wright, Bill: KPFK, 1976-78; KWIZ, 1978-89; KYMS, 1990-91; KBIG, 1992-96; KWVE, 1998-99. Bill is a producer for Ambassador Advertising Agency (now in Irvine). He's also active in voiceovers.
Wright, Bradley: KYSR, 2003-06. Bradley worked afternoons at "Star 98.7fm." He exited the station in the spring of 2006. He works the Hot AC format at Dial-Global and he has an active voiceover career.

WRIGHT, Charleye: KLAC, 1969-70; KIIS, 1970-75; KPOL, 1975-76; KIIS, 1981-90; KKBT, 1990-93; KNX, 1995-98. Charleye reported sports as "The Coach" alongside Rick Dees on KIIS for much of the eighties.

Born in Inglewood in 1937, Charleye graduated from Lynwood High and Compton College. He graduated with an M.A. from Baylor University with plans to enter the ministry. He got into broadcasting while in college.

Charleye taught high school English for two years and worked in Waco and Dallas radio, then moved to Dick Clark's KPRO-Riverside before arriving at KLAC. He was Les Crane's newsman in afternoon drive. At KIIS, he worked under programmer Chuck Blore, who was attempting features such as mini-dramas and a series of mind-sputtering aphorisms called "Kissettes." Chuck encouraged his newsmen to converse with the audience instead of reading to them. "The time with Blore was a great benefit to me. He encouraged the personality approach. He taught me to look for the human aspect of the news."

In 1982, Charleye won a third Golden Mike award. He had undergone dialysis three times per week for five years when the treatments began to fail. He was gradually deteriorating, to the point he became incoherent, could not speak plain English and couldn't remember the names of his wife and children. A successful transplant left him with one perfect kidney and two old ones that function less than ten percent of normal. His father died of the same ailment. "My father got it too young to take advantage of kidney transplants.” In the summer of 1990, he left Dees for the successful “House Party” morning drive show with John London at KKBT, where he continued to perform as "The Coach."

Charleye died October 27, 1998, at the age of 61. 

Wright, Jo Jo: KEZY, 1988; KIIS, 1997-2014. Jo Jo works evenings at KIIS/fm.
Wright, Van Earl: KFWB, 1997; KXTA, 2004-05. Van Earl worked morning drive at XTRA Sports 1150. In early 2008, he was the voice of the new American Gladiators on NBC.
Wyatt
, Jeff: KPWR, 1986-91; KIIS, 1991-94; KACD, 1996-97; KCMG, 1998. Jeff left his post at Red Zebra in Washington, DC in the summer of 2007. He's co-hosting a syndicated program, Afternoon Gumbo.
Wyatt, Marques: KKBT, 1994-95. Marques was a club dj at the Deep at 1650 in Hollywood.


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