Where Are They Now?
LARadio.com
LARP - D
Compiled by Don Barrett

db@thevine.net
 

D

D, Gary: KDAY, 1986-90. Gary Lynn Dillard started as an intern at KDAY and worked his way up to dj. He passed away in 1994.
D, Johnnie: KBBT, 1995-99. During the daily cacophony that surrounds us as we drive throughout the Southland, no matter the radio station we listen to, we hear a constant hum of traffic reports, traffic jams and the occasional freeway closures. We hear about traffic accidents and Sigalerts and always think these wrecks involve strangers. On May 10, 1999, at 4 a.m. a drunk driver got on the 91 freeway going the wrong way and ran head-on into Johnnie (Nichols), KKBT’s Street Team Supervisor, and killed him. Stacy Cunningham, "the Beat’s" promotion field manager said, "Johnnie was the very best person you could ever meet…ever! He was the best worker all around. He had integrity. He was honest, optimistic and everyone loved being around him." Johnnie’s dream was to be an actor and he was juggling two jobs to pursue his dream. In addition to the KKBT job he worked at UPS during the all-night hours and still managed to pick up his daughter every afternoon after school. He grew up in Carson. "Johnnie and I started at the radio station on the same day in 1995. He was just the best," said Stacy. He was 31.

DAGGY, Kimberlea: KUSC, 2001-12. Kimberlea worked middays at Classical KUSC until late summer 2012. From the KUSC website: "Her love of Classical music shines throughout her eclectic weekday program weekday afternoons and Saturday afternoons following The Opera Show. She created the highly popular choral music program, Soul Music, which she hosts Sunday mornings from 6-9. Kimberlea also explores composers’ lives in-depth in quarterly specials, such as the celebrations of the 200th birthdays of Chopin and Schumann in 2010, and Liszt's bicentinnial in 2011. In addition to soothing souls throughout Southern California on the air, Kimberlea gives pre-performance talks and writes program notes for a variety of organizations in Classical KUSC’s listening area, including Los Angeles Opera, the Ojai Music Festival and the Segerstrom Center for the Arts.

Along with her colleague Duff Murphy, Kimberlea hosted live broadcasts of Los Angeles Opera on Classical KUSC. She plays piano and frequently sings with the choir at the Parish of St. Matthew in Pacific Palisades, where her husband, Roger, is organist. Kimberlea and Roger have passed their love of music to their children, Max and Celia, who both sing, and Celia also plays violin.

 

DAHL, Steve: KPPC, 1972-73; KKDJ, 1973. Most Los Angeles disc jockeys achieve their greatest fame in L.A. Steve is almost an asterisk in the history of Southern California radio compared to his very successful run in Chicago radio. And it started at a baseball game. The catalyst for the death of Disco radio, Steve's "disco sucks" event attracted national attention when it was staged between a double header at the Chicago White Sox' Comiskey Park in July 1979. Dahl blew up an outfield filled with 20,000 disco LPs. The “disco inferno” turned into a fiasco when 7,000 fans rushed the field resulting in cancellation of the second game and White Sox owner Bill Veech's threat to ban Dahl from the park for life. His “disco demolition derby” started a very successful run in Chicago radio, mostly on WLUP where he teamed with Garry Meier.

Steve was born in Pasadena in 1954 and commented on his brief stay in Los Angeles: "With so much creative radio around like 'Firesign Theatre' and the 'Credibility Gap,' I realized that radio could be more than time, temp, and playing the music." During the 1970s, Dahl also worked in Bakersfield, San Diego and Sacramento. In 1973 Rick Carroll was in Bakersfield remixing the KKDJ jingles at the Buck Owens Studios and heard Steve on KAFY.

One of the KKDJ djs (T. Michael Jordan) remembers, "Rick asked Steve to do weekends at KKDJ and did for a very short time. He froze and sounded like crap. Rick wanted to axe him, but we all got the ax first and Steve went off to do big and wonderful things." He went to Detroit and made headlines when he faked a suicide attempt, which prompted the arrival in the studio of several fire rescue units. In early 1981, Rick Carroll brought him to KROQ from WLUP-Chicago, and the Pasadena outlet was to be the flagship for a nationwide network. “I was fired from WLUP and never started on KROQ.” He also worked for WDAI (the call letters stand for Detroit Auto Industry) and in Milwaukee. The roly-poly morning jock/performer also worked at WLS-Chicago and has been a major force in the Windy City radio wars. In the mid-1980s he commanded as much as $20,000 per appearance for his satirical live concerts. He played a dj in Grandview USA, starring Jamie Lee Curtis.

In 1989, he was given the Father of the Year Award following an on-air vasectomy. Sometimes Steve's routines flirted with bad taste. In his nightclub act, he would sing an Elvis parody, Heart Attack Hotel, ending the number by collapsing on stage. He has worked for a number of Chicago stations and today concentrates on a daily podcast. He was elected to the Radio Hall of Fame in 2013.

Dallas, Paul: KPFK, 1966-68. The former manager of KPFK and host of "Thinking Allowed," died in 1984.

(Doug Dunlap, Mike Dowler, DJ Syphe and DLux, and Frankie DiVita)

DALE, Bobby: KFWB, 1961-63; KRLA, 1964-65; KGBS, 1970. Bobby died January 17, 2001, following a long bout with liver cancer. He was 69. Bobby was born Robert Dale Bastiansen on July 27, 1931, in Minneapolis. After a series of "weird jobs," he started in radio at age 25 in Glendive, Montana. From the very beginning, Bobby knew he had an uncanny knack to pick hit records and he loved music. Bobby went on to KOIL-Omaha, where he replaced Gary Owens and then to KDWB-Minneapolis. In 1961, the disc jockeys at KFWB went out on strike in sympathy for the newsmen. Management and Crowell-Collier sister station jocks were called. Bobby worked his 6-to-9 p.m. shift in Minneapolis, got on an airplane to Los Angeles and was on the air in B. Mitch Reed's shift the next night. (Reed flew to Minneapolis to replace Dale.) For a brief time Bobby worked at KFWB's sister station, KEWB, in the Bay Area and then returned to the Southland to work at KRLA. "That was the biggest I ever was in L.A. I played the Rolling Stones like the others were playing the Beatles, and I was huge," he said when interviewed for Los Angeles Radio People. He also worked at the legendary MOR station, KSFO-San Francisco, in the late 1960s and for four years beginning in 1971. During his years in San Francisco, he hung out with Tom Donahue in North Beach. In the early 1980s he worked at KKCY ("The City")-San Francisco. He gave up radio as a full-time profession in 1985. From time to time he would appear on the University of San Francisco campus station, KUSF.

In 1992 he lost his voice and an operation on his nodules was required. In preparation for the operation, it was discovered that he had diabetes, a heart problem and cirrhosis of the liver. "The doctor told me that if I had one more drink or one more cigarette, I would die." For much of the last half of the 1990s, he went on to work with youngsters at a pre-school in San Rafael. "He was singular," said Ben Fong-Torres, author of The Hits Just Keep On Coming.

"Bobby had a jazz soul; a love of music ranging from pop to blues, folk & jazz. He loved breaking away from Top 40 and into the freedom he found at KSFO on the all-night shift and at the FM stations KSAN and KOFY. But even at Top 40, he was always his own guy, totally improv and off-the-wall, doing WC Fields/Lord Buckley-inspired riffs, goofing with live spots, and being so unpredictable that Chuck Blore once called him the worst dj he'd ever heard, and then, months later, hearing him again, declaring him one of the best." Ben talked with Bobby two weeks ago. "All in all, I've had a pretty good ride," Bobby told Ben. When Ben asked how he was feeling, facing death and all, Bobby said, "I'm feeling fine, cracking jokes, you know. I don't know what else to do."

(Carson Daly, Mark Driscoll, Captain Dale Dye, and Jeff Dean)

Dale, Sharon: KFOX, 1979-81; KMGG, 1981-83; KOST/KFI, 1983-2000; KABC, 2001-10. Since 2010, Sharon has been hosting the "Hill & Dale Show" on LA Talk Radio, Wednesdays at 4 p.m.
Dalton
, Bill: 1970-71. Bill runs the Dalton Group, owners of WGRR-Cincinnati and WWMG/WEND-Charlotte. He passed away in early November 2012.
Dalton, Don: KFI/KOST, 1982-84. Don, the former general manager at KFI/KOST, suffered a brain aneurysm the same day that the station’s airborne traffic reporter Bruce Wayne's plane went down in 1984.
Dalton, Rich: KWST, 1976-81. "Radio Rich" works middays at Emmis' KIHT-St. Louis. 
Daly, Carson: KROQ, 1996-97; KAMP, 2010-14. Carson hosts a late-night network tv show and in early 2010 started doing mornings at AMP Radio. He also hosts the enormously popular The Voice and reports from the Orange Room every morning on The Today Show.
Daly, Larry: XERB, 1967. Unknown.

       

(Pete Demetriou, Mason Dixon, Elmer Dills, and Tom Deacon)

Dame, Dave: KIKF, 1989-90. Dave is the West Coast Regional Promotion Manager for BNA Records, a Country Music division of RCA. He lives in Orange County.
Dameshek, Dave: KSPN, 2007-08. Dave started in afternoon drive at KSPN in late 2007. In the summer of 2008, he left his on-air shift and began exclusive podcasts for ESPN. He is currently a football analyst and writer for NFL.com, appearing on NFL Fantasy Live and hosting the Dave Dameshek Football Podcast.
Damian, Patrick: KJLH, 1976-78; KIIS, 1979; KDAY, 1981-82. Patrick is a singer and produces shows in Las Vegas.

DAMION: KLOS, 1971-80, pd; KMET, 1981-82; KLSX, 1986-94. The Hartford native has spent his entire career in AOR radio.

Before arriving in Los Angeles, Damion Bragdon was at WDAI-Chicago as the station evolved from “free-form” AOR to the “Rock 'n Stereo” format. He moved to Southern California to join KLOS in 1971 at the "home of rock 'n' roll radio." Damion partnered with Jim Ladd to produce the early "InnerView" shows. In a 1994 interview, he recalled his Southland radio highlights: "Being part of the California Jam in April 1973, and conducting four Led Zeppelin interviews and concerts. In the mid-'70s, KLOS was #1 and won Billboard magazine's Station of the Year." He was pd at KLOS in the late '70s and gave up those duties in 1980 to join KMET.

Damion joined KLSX and was a part of the original "classic rock" team. When his contract came due in the summer of 1994, it was not renewed - a major surprise to Damion. He joined Unistar's Adult Rock & Roll network for the overnight shift. In 1995 he went to the Hawaiian Islands, and on his first day he met a radio station owner who made Damion pd of his AM&FM operation. He returned from Hawaii in 2001 and Jeff Gonzer hired him for swing shifts at Westwood One, later to become Dial-Global.

He retired in late 2008 and lives in LaQuinta. "I love being retired but I still produce/voice a one-hour show called 'Rock and Roll Cowboy,' where I mix Modern Country and Classic Rock that airs Friday nights 11p-12a on KTHO-Lake Tahoe," said Damion in early 2013. "I remain in remission from 2011's non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and quite honestly I feel healthier than when I was in my 30's."

Daniel: KHTZ, 1979-82; KABC, 1982-2007. Daniel Oshe was the engineer for the morning show at KABC. He has retired.
Daniels, Bill: KFWB, 1957-58. Unknown.
Daniels, Dan: KRLA, 1993. Unknown.
Daniels, David B.: KWIZ, 1976. SEE Dave Roberts.
Daniels, Jason: KMXN, 2002. Jason worked swing at "COOL 94.3fm" until an ownership change in late 2002.
Daniels, Jim: KLSX, 1996-97; KOLA, 2005. Jim worked mornings at KOLA-Inland Empire until late 2005. He left FREE/fm in San Diego in early summer 2007. Since 2011, he has been program director, music director and on-air at KATY-Riverside-Temecula. Beginning in 2013 he works weekends at NBC Sports Network.
Daniels, Joe: KIIS, 1977-83; KHTZ, 1983-84; KRTH, 1984-91; KLAC, 1999-2001. Joe worked morning drive at KLAC, the Pop Standards station until a format change to Talk in 2001. He works out of Dial-Global.
Daniels, Mike: KRLA, 1989-98; KODJ/KCBS, 1990-92; KRTH, 1992-2008; KLIT, 1999-2005. Since 1994, Mike has been working at the Oldies format at Westwood One and has been with "K-Earth" since 1992. He left KRTH in February 2008 following a downsizing by parent company, CBS Radio.
Daniels, Roy: KLON, 1985-90. When he left KLON, Roy joined KJAZ-Alameda. He is now manager of a data center for MCI WorldCom in San Francisco.
Daniels, Sky: KMET, 1985-87; KCSN, 2011-13. Sky is the general manager at KCSN and works afternoon drive.
Daniels, Vince: KCAA, 2006-12. Vince hosted a talk show at Inland Empire's KCAA until the summer of 2012.
Darcel: KGFJ, 1976-77; KKTT, 1977. Unknown.
Darden, Chris, KFI, 1998. Chris was one of the prosecutors in the OJ Simpson murder trial. He is currently of Counsel to THE FOXX FIRM, a private criminal defense and civil litigation firm in Culver City.
Darin, Dave: KWIZ, 1968-70; KKGO/KGIL, 1999; KCRW, 2000-12; KCSN, 2012-13. Dave is director of Development at KCSN.

   

(Nicole Devereux, Robert Dornan, Guy Davis, and Jim Diamond)

DARIN, John: KIIS; KRLA, 1968-71; KDAY, 1971; KROQ, 1972-73; KNAC, 1975; KGOE, 1975; KNX, 1976; KGIL, 1976-83; KJOI, 1978; KBLA, 1989-92; KGIL, 1993; KFWB, 1998-2008. John Darin, an L.A. radio veteran both in front of the mic as well as pd duties across the dial, died March 9, 2014, at the age of 74.  The veteran had just been diagnosed a month earlier with Stage 4 pancreatic cancer.

Born John Christian Miller in Rapid City, South Dakota, he grew up in Ventura. When he was a youth John watched a broadcast, which led him to tell the dj, “when I grow up, I want to be a disc jockey.” In response, the dj said, “you can't do both!”

John arrived at KRLA in December of 1968 from KGB-San Diego via earlier stops at KACY-Oxnard and KMEN-San Bernardino, serving as music director at the latter. At KRLA, he started as a production man.  He would then become the character Filbert E. Yarborough (Bill Drake's name at KYA-San Francisco) on Dave Hull's morning drive show. Within a few months, Johnnie had his own show in late 1968 then a year later became program director.

“It all happened very quickly,” recalled John. In 1972 he started a decade of programs for Armed Forces Radio. He also served as the original pd at the ambitious, albeit ultimately unsuccessful KROQ/AM. After “the Roq,” John went to San Francisco to be gm of KSOL and orchestrated a Disco format.

In 1975, he returned to the Southland and spent a summer month at KNAC before becoming pd of KGOE in Thousand Oaks for six months. John’s father would give him prophetic advice about the “dj business,” telling him to prepare for a life after being a jock.

John began to make a transition into the world of business reporting on Channel 22 while doing business reports on KNX and playing music on KGIL. In the mid-1980s, John was an anchor on KCOP/Channel 13, field reporter on KHJ/Channel 9 and did reports for cable news. John and Chuck Ashman produced audio, video and websites for clients on nine major airlines under the banner “Flight Talk Network.” He reported business news on American Airlines’ audio channel for years. John helped launch KBLA as a full-time Business station in 1989 when realtor Fred Sands bought the station. After leaving the day-to-day radio grind, John would eventually operate a full-service ad agency specializing in infomercials (many of which he hosted) and industrial video work. “There is life after radio if you are creative, ambitious...and DESPERATE,” John said when interviewed for Los Angeles Radio People.

Daris, Jim: KGIL, 1958-59; KBIG, 1963-70; KFWB, 1970-71. Jim is married to Kathy Lennon of the Lennon Sisters. They live in Branson, Missouri.

DARK, Danny: KLAC, 1963-66. Danny was a very successful voiceover announcer. He died June 13, 2004, of liver failure at the age of 65.

 For decades, Danny was one of those big voices that was heard on some of the top blue-chip national spots including Chevrolet, Budweiser, Mazda, Camaro, NBC, AT&T, K-Mart, Texaco, Armorall, Whitman’s Chocolates and hundreds more. “Danny was the long-time king of the voiceover commercial announcer world,” said Chuck Blore. “He was my very best friend. Long live the King!”

Born Danny Croskery in Oklahoma City, Danny was brought up in Tulsa. He started at KICK-Springfield, Missouri while working his way through Drury College. Before arriving in Southern California, Danny jocked at KAKC-Tulsa, WERE-Cleveland, WFUN-Miami, WTIX-New Orleans and WIL and KXOK-St. Louis. He hosted evenings at KLAC from 1963-66. At the end of our interview in 1997, Danny said: “I have had a wonderful career.”

Darling, Bob: KJOI, 1986-88. Bob is a partner in a group that owns seven radio stations in California.
Darrell, John: KSRF; KMNY. The former pd at KSRF is now a writer.
Darren, Dangerous: KNAC, 1989-95. Dangerous Darren Silva is at Sirius Radio Network.
Dash, Hal: KHJ, 1972-77. Hal was a newsman at 93/KHJ along side Robert W. Morgan, The Real Don Steele, Johnny Williams, Marv Howard and Lyle Kilgore. In 1977, Hal joined Cerrell Associates as a Public Relations rep. He's now the chairman and ceo of Cerrell, an agency that does government relations, PR, lobbying and media. Hal does tv and radio political commentary and radio spots for candidates.

Davis
, Ann: KACE, 1985. Ann McCollum, the former Mrs. Willie Davis, died of cancer in late 1997.
Davis, Bill: KEZY, 1984. Bill is operations manager and on-air at KROC-Rochester, Minnesota

       

(Krickett Davis, John Driscoll, and Vince Daniels)

Davis, Cindy: KNOB, 1987; KOCM, 1988-89; KLIT, 1991-94; KLSX, 1995. Cindy works at KOLA in the Inland Empire.
Davis, Dick: KGFJ, 1980. Dick passed away in 1987.
Davis, Gina: KGGI, KZLA; KPWR. Born Theresa Tran, Gina was killed while base jumping when her parachute failed to open. She died in December 20, 1995.
Davis, Gordon: KFWB, 1968-72. Gordon left radio for a corporate job dealing with the Pacific Rim.
Davis, Guy: KHTZ, 1985; KBZT, 1986; KLSX, 1986; KBIG, 1986-95; KNJO/KLIT/KMLT, 1996-2003; KABC, 1998-2000. Guy was teamed with Mark Taylor for the TaylorDavis show at all-Talk KABC until 2000. He owns a hair salon in Thousand Oaks.
Davis, Jay: KEZY, 1961-71; KNX, 1965-67; KGER, 1971-92. Jay retired to Las Vegas.
Davis, Jeff: KNX/fm, 1988; KRTH, 1988-91; KYSR, 1992-95; KBIG, 1998. The long-time WLS-Chicago dj has an active voiceover career.
Davis, Jeff: KRTH, 1986-88; KPWR, 1988-89; KQLZ, 1991-93; KMPC, 1993-94; KCBS, 1993-94; KFWB, 1994; KNX, 1999-2003; KFRG, 2002-10. Jeff is news director at KFRG-San Bernardino.
Davis, Jim: KHJ, 1976-77; KMPC, 1979-81. Jim is vp/general manager of Vero Beach Broadcasters (WOSN/WGYL/WJKD/WTTB).
Davis, Ken: KPPC, 1974-75. Ken is a writer/producer for television.
Davis
, Ken: KUTE, 1986; KOST, 1994. Ken works in a Los Angeles law firm and he's out of radio.
Davis, Krickett: KYSR, 1992-93; KMGX, 1993; KCBS, 1993-2000. Krickett left "Arrow 93" in January 2000. She is an active VO artist.
Davis, Larry: KBIG, 2008-09. Larry is a voiceover artist doing spots and promos for Six Flags, VISA, My Network TV, ABC, Fox Sports, McDonalds, NHL, Gillette, NFL Network and many more. His Web site is: LarryDavisVoice.com.

 

(Hal Dash, Joe Daniels, Mike Daniels, and Bill Drake)

Davis, Laura: KNAC, 1976; KLOS, 1976-80. Laura produces electronic press kits for the motion picture business.
Davis, Mac: KZLA, 1999-2000. Mac performs in concert.
Davis, Mark: MetroTraffic, KNX, KLAC, KMGG/KPWR, KLON, KGIL/fm, 1983-86. In 2001, Mark (Friedman) went to Chicago to be a newswriter at WBBM.
Davis, Michael: KNAC, 1989-90. Michael is operations director/afternoons at KRKC-Monterey.
Davis, Nawana: KMET, 1975. Unknown.
Davis, Pat: KNX. Pat was a well-known broadcast journalist who covered nearly every major story in Northern California since the 1960s. At 6-foot-4, Mr. Davis was an imposing figure in the Sacramento press corps, partly because of his physical size but also because of his tenacity in going after stories. He was described as an aggressive, physically imposing reporter with a skeptical demeanor and a biting sense of humor, often covering stories hundreds of miles apart in a single day. In three decades of stringing for various stations, he covered earthquakes, floods, elections, scandals, and tales of triumph and tragedy. He was a familiar voice on KFBK-Sacramento, his home radio station, as well as KNX, KGO-San Francisco and CBS radio in New York City. Friends and relatives say he was a classic old-school reporter. Born in Milwaukee, Pat worked his way up in the industry. He started as a radio reporter in Fresno, then anchored at a television station in Bakersfield. He also worked as a free-lance reporter for the Los Angeles Times in the 1960s and early 1970s. Pat would regularly take 20-mile bike rides out into the country. On the day of his death, he was returning from one of those rides when he suffered a heart attack and died at the Kaiser Permanente hospital in Roseville. The aggressive newsman who filed news reports from Sacramento died October 1, 1999. Pat was 58.

 

(Mike Donnegan, Jeff Davis, John Duncan, and John Davison)

Davis, Philip: KOCM; KWIZ, 1965-88. Philip, the former owner of KOCM and KWIZ, died December 5, 1996, at the age of 60.
Davis, Willie: KACE. The former all-pro with the Green Bay Packers sold KACE to Cox Communications. He continues to own three stations in Wisconsin and three in California.

DAVISON, John: KABC/KDIS/KLOS/KSPN, 2001-07; KABC/KLOS, 2007-09. John was appointed gm at the four ABC/Disney stations on July 16, 2001. “We need to bring back the heartbeat of KABC,” said John shortly after his arrival. “It’s still there, but it needs some resuscitation. We need for the station to reach out and touch L.A. like it once did. Given the complexities of the market, it may be unrealistic that it would regain its former status, but on the other hand, it is such a legendary station with so many roots in the market and great call letters. I’m just proud to be there. Hopefully we can get it on track with good programming moves. We’re going to try and get the heartbeat back as best we can by becoming what we were once and what we should become again – the premier place where people come to talk. We’re not sensational. We’re not hate mongers. If somebody else wants to do that, then that’s their niche, but not ours. If a mistake was made, it was an attempt to take us in that direction,” claimed John.

John was working at KGO-San Francisco when the gm, Mickey Luckoff, asked if John would be interested in the vacant job at the ABC sister stations, as interim-gm Bill Sommers was retiring for a final time. Mickey put John together with Mitch Dolan, president of ABC O&O radio group. “I looked at it as a great opportunity for me, not only to live in L.A., which I’ve always enjoyed, but to get back to running stations, which I’ve done most of the way along the line,” said John. “The whole thing took about a month.”

He left in February 2009 following ownership change and he now lives in New York where he is a licensed real estate agent buying, selling and renting properties for Bellmarc Realty in New York City. "I now have three grandchildren, two boys in London and a girl in New York City. Life is good." 

Dawson, Ted: KLOS, 1985. Ted is a newscaster at KESQ/TV-Palm Springs.

DAY, Deano: KLAC, 1969-71 and 1980-82 and 1984-85. Deano, morning man at KLAC three times during the Country years, died April 10, 2009, due to complications of heart surgery at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. Deano had just turned 70 years old days before his death.

Born Ordean Moen, Deano was a station owner in Fargo while still in his 20s. He replaced the legendary Ken Dowe and Granny Emma in the morning drive slot at the legendary KLIF-Dallas in 1967. He left Big D for his first visit to Country KLAC in 1969. Deano’s major success came in the Midwest where he did mornings on a number of Country stations in Chicago and Detroit. In 1975, Deano won Billboard magazine’s Country Personality of the Year Award while working at WDEE-Detroit. He also worked at WCAR-Detroit. It seems Deano never met a radio station he wouldn’t work for in Detroit ... or Chicago. He returned to Detroit at WCXI in 1982, after 18 months at KLAC.

In October 1984, Deano won the 18th Annual CMA DJ of the Year Award, and the ceremony was broadcast live on CBS/TV. Deano was nominated for CMA 1983 DJ of the Year. His fan club, unheard of in the 1980s, numbered over 5,000. He had enormous turnouts to his personal appearances. Deano left Los Angeles for the last time with Metromedia’s sale of KLAC to Capital Cities Communications. He bought WACY-Flint. Deano went on to broker mornings on WHND-Detroit, programming a mix of Country and Oldies. Deano talked about his WHND show: “We do a remote every day. One day we broadcast from a restaurant called Heaven. The next day we were in a tavern called Oar House, so the next day we went to Hell...Michigan. It’s amazing, I’m still playing Country music and I look just like Kenny Rogers.” At the time he said he made more money brokering his show than he ever did working for a radio station. 

Day, Gene: KGFJ, 1974. Unknown.

 

(Laura Davis, Jonathan Doll, Todd Donoho, Warren Duffy, and Lou Dobbs)

Day, Howard: KLFM/KNOB, 1960-61; KAPP, 1962-63; KKOP, 1965; KNAC, 1966; KFOX, 1966; KKOP, 1968-74 and 1976-78. Howard works as an engineering tech for Optical Coating Laboratory of Santa Rosa.
Day, Jerry: KIEV, 1972. Unknown.
Day, Steve: KOCM/KSRF, 1985-89; KXEZ, 1989-91; KLIT, 1991-93; KMGX, 1994. Steve is working at KAZM-Sedona, Arizona.
Dayglo: KNAC, 1983-84. David Daegling is is the Department of Anthropology at the University of Florida.
Dayton, Bob: KBLA,1966-67; KRLA, 1967-70; KDAY, 1971; KRLA, 1972-73. Bob died of cancer April 28, 1995, at the age of 62.

DEACON, Squeakin': KXLA, 1947-60; KGER, 1949-58; KFOX, 1960-. Squeaking Deacon, born Carl Lee Moore in Paragould, Arkansas, was a hard-core Country jock in the 50s and 60s at KXLA (pre-KRLA) and KFOX. He was on the staff of early Country stations with some of the biggest names in Country radio – Cliffie Stone, Biff Collie, and Hugh Cherry. His father was called "Skinny" Moore and was a baseball pitcher for New Orleans. Two months before Carl was born, his father was killed in a railroad train wreck. By the time Carl was six he had become fascinated with the drums. He was completely self-taught; he got his inspiration watching the theatre drummers who performed impressive gyrations with their sticks while never missing a beat of the music. It wasn't long before young Carl Moore was considered one of the flashiest young drummers around. He formed his own band while in high school in Jonesboro and impressed the audiences with his mastery of the drum sticks.  

After graduating from high school, he enrolled in the University of Arkansas, but show business had gotten into his blood. He took his small band on the road, playing throughout the South. Often in tobacco warehouses, which made good, inexpensive dance halls in the smaller towns. 

Acting as his own announcer and master of ceremonies, he invariably opened his broadcast with the greeting, "Howdy, folks, this is the Deacon speakin'." A testimony to the Deacon's lasting and memorable popularity as a performer was published in the February 16, 1977 issue of the Memphis Press-Scimitar. Columnist Clark Porteus recounted the glory clays of Memphis' venerable Orpheum Theatre, observing that the greatest money-maker who ever played there was Carl "Deacon" Moore. Porteus waxed sentimental over the Deacon's version of A Shanty In Old Shanty Town.

The Deacon had to break up the band in 1942 because of World War II. Travel restrictions put a dent in any kind of touring. He was also just over the age of military service, so he and his wife Marge decided to settle down in Cincinnati to try out other opportunities. He began a morning program on WLW. Margie recalled for Mr. Bennett, "...that the Deacon would appear for the daily show, deliver a brief monologue, act as master of ceremonies to introduce an act or two, and come home." One of the regulars on that show was a young singer by the name of Doris Day, who would go on to her own fame, too.

In 1947, he and Margie moved to Los Angeles. He heard that a radio station in Pasadena was auditioning for a disc jockey opening. He went and applied, that is he and 300 others.  A set of radio logs showed that Carl was indeed a hit in Los Angeles. He was doing two shows a week over two different stations. He did a show at lunch time on KGER and then later at night, an hour's show over KXLA. 

But Carl's talents won out over the field for the job at KXLA, now KRLA. He was a natural as a master-of-ceremonies after his many years as a band leader and radio work elsewhere. He also seemed to be a natural as a country and western disc jockey, with an easy style, Arkansas accent and 'homespun humor' helped entrench him in the role.  

During his dj days, the name "Deacon" acquired a new twist as Mr. Bennett related in his article. "Some of the youngsters, including his own grandchildren, began calling him the "Squeakin' Deacon." The adjective became a permanent adjunct and Carl adopted the new sobriquet for his radio image. The greeting became 'This is the Squeakin' Deacon speakin,' used continuously in his climb to the top ranks of country-western disc jockeys He was one of the pioneer djs to achieve success on the west coast."  

In the 1960's, the Squeakin' Deacon had taken his talents to radio station KFOX out of Long Beach. He would do a remote hookup on his daily program and would host many of the great country music stars on his show over the years, such as Cliffie Stone, Tennessee Ernie Ford, Merle Travis and Barbara Mandrell were among the many guests.  

The old Deacon became a familiar figure at high-profile country-western events, often in the role of master of ceremonies. He was also one of the early performers on television, with a daily show on KNBC/Channel 4 in the early 1950s. A 1950 edition of a Billboard Magazine annual poll had him chosen as the "Favorite Folk Disc Jockey."

During that time, Deacon owed his success to the popularity of his KXLA "Home Hour for Western Folks," a prime-time hourly broadcast five days each week sponsored by Seaboard Finance Company. The Deacon ranked sixth in the national popularity poll, several positions higher than Tennessee Ernie Ford. In fact, only three djs from the west coast ranked in the top 20. Then, he had two programs, five days a week.  

Squeakin' Deacon was a bit of a country philosopher with a bit of a humorous touch. An article we found in an old Cowboy Songs magazine had a few examples of that.

Speaking of success, he mentioned there is no end to success. He said the toughest part of a career is to just hold on to the success you attained. Success wasn't on merit alone - you need breaks too. He was quoted as saying "...many a rose has blossomed and never been smelt."

And what did the Squeakin' Deacon attribute his success? He said, "The good Lord had been good to me. Without faithful friends, fans and admirers, YOU might as well go back to Arkansas. You don't eat without'em, that's for sure. ... There's good in everybody if you only look far enough." Carl continued to maintain his popularity in the country-western field until his retirement in 1969. But he never changed his format, which was essentially the same as that which made him a successful big band leader. Carl "Deacon" Moore continued to be the quintessential image of an Arkansas preacher, and his fans loved him in the role. In his article, he notes that Margie recalls the mountain of gifts that would flood their home in observation of birthdays, anniversaries, and important events in their lives. She said that she and Carl remembered those country-western fans as the most generous and loyal they had ever known.

In 1983, the Deacon was diagnosed with prostate cancer and gradually lost ground to the disease. The Squeakin’ Deacon died February 12, 1985. The complete story of his life can be found at: http://www.hillbilly-music.com/dj/story/index.php?id=1640 

Deacon, Tom: KUSC, 1989-92. Tom is retired and he is living in the "splendours of the Ontario countryside."
Dean
, Jeff: KEZY, 1977-79; KLSX, 1985-86; KGGI, 1987-93. Jeff is doing afternoons at 95.7 The Beat (KZBR) in San Francisco along with an Oldies Show syndicated by the Waitt Radio Network.
Dean, Joseph: KTWV, 1994-99. Joseph worked weekends at "the Wave."
DeAngelis, Barbara: KFOX; KABC; KFI, early 1990s. Barbara is a relationship expert, author, and motivational speaker.
Dearborn, Bob: KFI, 1984-85; KTWV, 1989. Unknown.
DeBaun, Jim: KLON, 1975-79. Jim is an industrial security specialist for the Boeing Company in Anaheim. He's also a rock bass guitar player.

   

(Jim Duncan, Sheri Donovan, Pat Duffy, and Gary Douglas)

DeCastro, Jim: KFAC, 1989; KKBT, 1989-90. Jim owns a restaurant in Chicago. He's now president/gm at WGN-Chicago.
DeCoy, Bob: KGFJ, 1950s; KTYM, 1960s. Bob was the writer, producer and narrator of KGFJ's award-winning, "This Is Progress." The program was the only daily radio documentary dedicated to the contributions of black culture and growth. Bob graduated from Yale University in 1951 receiving an M.F.A. degree. He died at age 54 in L.A. in 1975.
Dedes, Spero: KLAC, 2005-11. Spero was the play-by-play announcer for the LA Lakers. In the summer of 2011, he left for a broadcasting post with the New York Knicks. He left the Knicks after the 2013-14 season.
Dee, Cynthia: KSWD, 2008-14. Cynthia works swing at 100.3/fm The Sound.
Dees, Rick: KHJ, 1979-80; KIIS, 1981-2004; KMVN, 2006-09; KHHT, 2011-12. Rick left morning drive at KIIS/fm in February 2004 and joined Emmis' KMVN in the summer of 2006 for mornings at Movin' 93.9. He left with a format flipped LMA on April 15, 2009. He started mornings at HOT 92.3 in the late spring of 2011. He left HOT mornings in July 2012.

DeFRANCESCO, Gerry: KIIS, 1982-86, pd and 1991-92, vp/gm. A native of Philadelphia, Gerry received a communications degree with honors from Temple University in 1977. Beginning in April 1982, Gerry arrived from Gannett's KSD-St. Louis with Wally Clark. Gerry guided KIIS' initial good fortune until 1986. During his stay with Gannett Broadcasting, he was vp/programming in 1984 while retaining pd at KIIS. In 1986 he moved to Gannett's WDAE/WUSA-Tampa as vp/gm. He left Gannett briefly to return home to Philadelphia as vp of WYXR.

Gerry returned to KIIS in August 1991 to be president/station manager, a position he held through 1992. He made one of the rare moves from programming to general management. In 1992 he started serving as president of the Gannett Radio Division. Gerry is now a media management consultant based in Newtown Square, Pennsylvania. He's married to Carolyn and has two children, Katie and Gerry. He’s  president of DeFrancesco Media.

DeLaCruz, Nautica: KPWR, 1998-2000; KKBT, 2000-06; KDAY, 2006-07; KJLH 2007-14. Nautica does middays at the Stevie Wonder station, KJLH.
Delaney, John: KJLH, 1984-85; KMET, 1985-87; KEZY, 1987-90. John has been doing voiceover work and he's working on a comedy act.

   

(Lee Duncan and Bill Dudley)

Delilah: KBIG, 1998; KMLT, 2003; KBIG, 2007; KJLL, 2010; KFSH, 2012. Delilah's syndicated "Love Songs" show is heard on KFSH, "the FISH."  
Del Valle, Carlos: KFWB, 2003-04; KXTA, 2004. The former KNBC/Channel 4 sports anchor joined all-News KFWB in late 2003. By the summer of 2004, Carlos teamed with Ray Crockett at XTRA Sports for an evening show called, "Crockett and Carlos' Neighborhood."

DeMARAIS, Adam J.: KHJ, 1964-65; KRLA, 1964-65; KBLA, 1966; KRLA, 1968-69; KEZY, 1970-81, nd; KRLA, 1988-91. Adam is one of the powerful, booming voices who reported the news in Southern California.

Born in Montreal he studied to be an actor and toured with a company out of New York while still a teen. "I decided to pursue Hollywood and the world would pave my way with palm branches and gold, not the myrrh and pyrite it turned out to be."

Adam arrived in Southern California by bus in 1948 and stayed briefly in the old Bunker Hill section of Los Angeles. "I took the Angels Flight daily to catch a street car to go out on cattle call auditions." To make ends meet he worked on the loading docks of Coca-Cola while pursuing theater arts and communications courses at L.A. City College. When the draft board caught up with him, he had a choice of returning to Canada or going in the service. "Since I had married an American woman and we were with child, I figured that I'd spend the rest of my life in the States so I went to Korea." He was promoted to combat platoon sergeant and received a Purple Heart for serious wounds suffered in action.

Adam returned to the Southland, "but I had lost the directions to the yellow brick road and bought a beer/wine bar, graduated from the Don Martin radio school (The Real Don Steele was a classmate) and worked at the Bel-Air Hotel for four years. My first dj job was at KACY-Oxnard in 1960." During the 1960s he worked at KFXM-San Bernardino seven times, KDEO and KSON-San Diego, as well as KORK-Las Vegas, and KGU-Honolulu. In the Islands, he had a recurring role on Hawaii 5-O.

In the 1980s he worked as an announcer at KTTV/Channel 11. In 1991 he suffered a stroke that left him partially paralyzed. "Six months later, I was back to normal. It was amazing." Some highlights from decades in the Southland include being personally involved with police and a gunmen during a bank hostage situation, covering five U.S. presidents, Academy Awards and flying in the Blue Angels plane. During the 1990s Adam worked as a bartender at Ghost Town at Knott's Berry Farm.

He died December 11, 1998 from complications of cancer. Adam was 69.

DEMENTO, Dr.: KPPC, 1970-71; KMET, 1972-87; KLSX, 1987-93; KSCA, 1994-97; KLSX, 1998. His show has been the most successful AOR syndicated show of weird, off-beat, often homemade music. Perhaps best known as the man who launched "Weird Al" Yankovic's career, the Doctor has also resurrected awareness of Spike Jones, Tom Lehrer, Stan Freberg and other classic comedy musicians.

Born Barret "Barry" Hansen in Minneapolis in 1941, the Doctor-to-be began haunting thrift shops for old records while in junior high, eventually accumulating nearly half a million platters of all speeds, sizes and shapes. He began his radio career at 10-watt KRRC/fm on the campus of Reed College in Portland. After graduating from Reed with a degree in classical music theory, he headed for UCLA where he wrote a master's thesis on the evolution of black music from blues to rock & roll. After a stint as road manager for the rock-blues band Canned Heat, he became a staff producer for Specialty Records, where he compiled numerous LP reissues of vintage blues, gospel and rock recordings.

Meanwhile he was invited to share some of his vintage treasures with the audience of alternative-programmed KPPC in 1970. He was playing Transfusion by Nervous Norvus when the gm's secretary commented "You've got to be demented to play that on the radio!" Rechristened Dr. Demento, Hansen was hired for a weekly rare-oldies show which soon mutated into a bonanza of "mad music and crazy comedy." The Doctor moved to KMET in 1972, and has been nationally syndicated since 1974. In 1975 Warner Bros. released Dr. Demento's Delights, the first of nearly two dozen Dr Demento compilation albums. Most of them are on Rhino, including his 20th, 25th and 30th Anniversary Collections and The Very Best Of Dr. Demento (2001) which includes his all-time most requested songs: Fish Heads, Dead Puppies and They're Coming To Take Me Away, Ha-Haaa! He has also worked on many other Rhino compilations; his notes for "The Remains Of Tom Lehrer" received a Grammy nomination. Away from the microphone, Hansen has always been a serious student of many types of music. Recently, his non-demented side was revealed to the world with the publication of his first full-length book, Rhino's Cruise Through The Blues from Backbeat Books. After a fourteen-year stint with Westwood One, the Doctor's show is now distributed under his own Talonian Productions banner.

Demetriou, Pete: KLAC, 1978-84; KFWB, 1985-2009; KNX/KFWB, 2009-13. Pete is a field reporter for all-News KNX.
Demory, Sean: KEZY, 1988-89. Sean left the Southland for "Power 99," then "99X" in Atlanta for nearly 11 years. He left in early 2000 to pursue some Internet opportunities in San Francisco.
Denholm, Dave: KXTA, 1998-2000; KSPN, 2001-09. Dave did sports updates at KSPN until early 2009. He's now doing traffic reports for various LA radio stations.

   

(Lin Durling, Frank DeSantis and Jim Daniels)

DENIS, Mark: KFI, 1969; KEZY, 1969-83; KHJ, 1983-86; KRLA, 1986; KFI/KOST/KACE, 1986-2000. The 40-year veteran of Southern California radio died April 28, 2000. Mark had heart surgery on January 18 and had returned to work at KFI mid-March. On April 27, Mark went to the hospital complaining of a "burning sensation." Doctors could not find anything wrong and his arteries were fine. Doctors sent him home thinking he may have had a touch of pneumonia. It is believed that he died in his sleep and when paramedics arrived at his Anaheim Hills home the following morning and transported him to a local hospital, it is believed that he had already passed away. The cause of death is unknown.

Mark was 59. He was born in Glendale on February 8, 1941, and grew up in Compton. During his time at Compton JC, he announced the half-time activities at the football games. The show-business bug, however, bit him much earlier. Mark built a performing stage in his garage and put on variety shows. His first on-air experience was KFIL (later KYMS), and he pronounced the call letters "KFI LFM".

Interviewed in 1995 between traffic reports, he commented, "Isn't it ironic that I end up at KFI?" He got started in Hemet in the early 1960s and went to KFXM-San Bernardino in 1962 before spending "some time in the Air Force." After the service, he went to KMEN-San Bernardino to do overnights and production, which in 1966 led to KGB-San Diego where he spent three years and ended up pd. He made his transition from dj work to traffic during his time on KHJ, when it was called "Car Radio" and traffic reports were dispensed every 10 minutes.

Mark was universally one of the most well-liked radio people in Southern California and made over 300 calls a year wishing his peers "Happy Birthday!" KFI pd David Hall utilized Mark as the "image voice" for the 50,000 watt giant and as the midday traffic reporter. He had been a regular guest lecturer and had taught a course in telecommunications at USC. Mark was the voice of the monorail at Disneyland for half a decade. His key to success? "Be versatile! After all, at KEZY I survived five program directors and I was one of them." On September 1, 1996, Mark celebrated 35 years in broadcasting, making it one of the longest current running careers in Southern California radio. During his decade-plus with KFI/KOST, he broadcast more than 70,000 traffic reports. 

 

(John Darin, Benjamin Dover, and Mac Davis)

Derdivanis, Kent: KMPC, 1983-86. Kent is now living in Phoenix and is the voice of Northern Arizona University Sports. He's doing play by play of both football and basketball for the Flagstaff, Arizona college.
DeRoo, Doug: KIQQ, 1977. Doug is md at KGFM-Bakersfield.
DeSaegher, Steve: KPZE/KORG/KEZY, 1987-99; KFWB, 1997-99; KMPC, 2001-03; KLAC, 2011. Steve was an anchor for 1540/The Ticket. He's now an update guy at all-Sports, KLAC.
DeSantis, Frank: KMET, 1977-79; KWST, 1979-83; KNX/fm, 1983; KLOS, 1983-88. Frank was an air personality at Sirius Satellite Radio's The Vault and Classic Vinyl formats from 2002-08. He's currently in New York as svp/business development for Dial Global Radio Networks.
DeSantis
, Gia: KROQ, 1993. The former Capitol Records promotion person and Channel 56 vj is out of radio and lives in New Mexico.
DeSilva, Walt: KPPC, 1965-66; KFWB. Walt passed away of lung cancer in August of 1987.

DeSOTO, Dave: KMPC, 1965-82. Dave died June 27, 2001 of aortic valve disease. He was 71.

The veteran newsman served as Orange Country bureau chief for KMPC and was also part of the Robert W. Morgan morning drive team. He was active in community theatre.

During the mid-1970s he was in the Costa Mesa Civic Playhouse’s production of You Can’t Take It With You. In late 1980 Dave suffered a heart attack that affected his speech. From his hospital bed he began reading magazines aloud. In the beginning it was only a sentence at a time without stumbling or slurring. Within a month he was back to work at KMPC. Dave retired in 1987.

Detz, John: KWST, 1975. John owns radio stations in Northern California.
Devaney, Ken: KHJ, 1965-67. Ken has retired from radio and the world of lawyering. He lives in Central California.
Devereux, Nicole: KMET, 1984-85; KJOI, 1986-89; KTWV, 1987-2003; KSWD, 2009. Nicole works weekends at 100.3/fm The Sound.

   

(Dave Darin, Steve Downes, Joseph Dean, and Barbara DeAngelis)

DeVille, Diana: KNAC, 1998-2003. The Monroe, Louisiana native works morning drive at KNAC.com.
Devoe, Mario: KCMG, 1998-99. Mario is working at KXJM-Portland.
DeVoid, Phil: KNAC, 1984-85. Phil Harvey's name on KNAC was given to him by record producer Robert Margouleff, which was inspired by Oingo Boingo song Fill the Void.
DeWeese, Eric: KUSC, 2005-13. Eric took over gm duties at the Classical station in the Fall of 2005.
DeWitt, Paul: KLSX, 1995. Unknown
DeWitt, Rand: KMXN, 2001-02. Rand is Vice President and Creative Director at Advoke Media. 

DEXTER, Jerry: KMPC, 1959-63; KLAC, 1963-64. "I was lucky to work at one of the last, great American radio stations, KMPC."

Born in San Francisco, by age 15 Jerry was already appearing on local tv shows. At age 20, he opened his own publicity office. As famed San Francisco Chronicle jazz columnist, Ralph J. Gleason noted: "Dexter is the nation's youngest night club press agent, yet not old enough to be in a bar." In San Francisco, he was befriended by KSFO morning giant, Don Sherwood. In 1957, Jerry took a job with the CBS/TV affiliate in Las Vegas. At KENO-Las Vegas an on-air stunt to save the doomed fictional character Tom Dooley (Jerry claimed Dooley was being held in a Las Vegas jail) attracted not only local coverage but a full-page story in Newsweek. Don Sherwood urged Golden West Broadcasting to hire Jerry for the morning drive slot at KVI-Seattle.

Within months, KMPC programming vp Robert Forward moved Jerry from Seattle to KMPC becoming, at 24, the youngest on-air talent ever hired at the station. Movie Mirror Magazine named him one of "America's great radio performers" and the LA Times' Don Page named Jerry as host of "The Best Popular Music Show of 1963." Jerry appeared in Gomer Pyle, Dragnet, McHale's Navy and a host of other tv shows. His voiceover work on cartoons included Josie and the Pussycats, Aquaman and Gulliver. In 1968 he hosted his daily variety/interview show on KABC/Channel 7 called Good Day L.A. with Jerry Dexter.

Jerry was featured in one of 1969's biggest films, Robert Redford's Downhill Racer. He wrote and produced a tv special, Words & Music by Bobby Troup. For a year he was encased in a black bag as KTTV/Channel 11's morning movie host. The gimmick attracted much national attention. Jerry was the announcer on Alex Trebec's first American show, NBC's Wizard of Odds. For the past 20 years he’s syndicated and distributed tv shows around the world including The Wolfman Jack Show, Johnny Cash Ridin' The Rails and the Willie Nelson Special. "If it hadn’t been for Don Sherwood, I have no idea where I would be. I was so lucky to have been at KMPC in the last days of that legendary radio station. I will always remember that time in my life as being the most fun!" Jerry lives in San Francisco. 

Di, Lady: KNAC, 1986-87. Unknown.

DIAMOND, Dave: KHJ, 1965; KBLA, 1965-67; KFWB, 1967-68; KRLA, 1971-72; KIIS/AM, 1972-75; KFI, 1976-82. Dave, one of the original KHJ “Boss Jocks,” died May 6, 2014, in Spearfish, South Dakota, following a bout with pneumonia. He was 74.

In 2011, Dave wrote on his website: “I had a stroke that hit me like a swinging baseball bat. But I am slowly fighting my way back. It’s been a long rough road. Don’t know what the future holds. Doctors tell me I have a fading heart, but they have told me that before.”

The Howard, South Dakota native was born Sid Davison. He attended Louisiana State University and graduated with BS degrees in journalism and history from the University of Southern Mississippi. He began his radio career working on the campus radio station, WMSU, at Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg. He also received an MA in English from Northwest Missouri State University, and he earned a masters in fiction writing from the professional writing program at the University of Southern California, where he graduated magna cum laude.

Dave served in the U.S. Army with the 147th field Artillery, South Dakota National Guard during the Korean War. He was transferred to the U.S. Reserve and was honorably discharged in 1962.

He had early radio experience with Don Burden on Omaha's KOIL, where he began using the name Dave Diamond.. He was pd of WKGN-Knoxville and WIL-St. Louis and he had a radio and tv show in Denver before reaching Los Angeles.

Dave became one of KHJ's original "Boss Jocks" when the new format was launched in April 1965, but he lasted only a couple of months. "I thought I knew a lot about radio until I met Bill Drake. Boss Radio was a great experience for me," explained Dave, following his firing. "I didn't fit in. I wasn't focused. I had too many things going on.

Dave went to KBLA where he launched the “Diamond Mine” and started playing long LP cuts of progressive rock songs interspersed with psychedelic commentary. Besides KHJ and KBLA, Dave worked at Top 40 KFWB, KRLA, KIIS AM and KFI.  

According to the book Can't Get Out of Here Alive, Dave is credited as the founder of The Doors.

In 1966, he was signed to emcee the Miss America Go-Go Contest. He also worked the Crescendo Night Club on the Sunset Strip and Hollywood's The Action. In 1967, Dave starred in an ABC/TV pilot called Helpmate. Dave published Incense & Peppermint by the Strawberry Alarm Clock which reached #1 in 1967.

In 1968, he appeared in an episode of ABC/TV's Outsiders. Then he went to San Francisco's KFRC, where he worked from 1968 into the '70s. In 1971, besides his work on KRLA, he hosted a daily tv show called Headshop on KDOC/Channel 56.

He produced Acapulco Gold by the Rainy Daze.  

In 1972, Dave was the pd of KCBS/fm-San Francisco and briefly did middays at KTLK-Denver. He returned to the Southland a year later and went to KIIS morning drive, moving to evenings in 1974 and staying at the station until 1975. In 1976 he signed on at KFI for music and talk shows.

Dave moved back to South Dakota and taught communications at Black Hills State University, while managing KBHU/fm in Spearfish. In recent years he retired from teaching to write. In early 2014, the local Spearfish newspaper reported: “Dave Diamond, professor emeritus in journalism, was awarded the annual South Dakota State Poetry Prize. Diamond's poems will be featured in an upcoming chapbook published by the South Dakota State Poetry Society. More than 20 of Mr. Diamond's poems will be featured in the chapbook." He had also been writing a series of western novels.

Diamond, Jim: KYMS, 1969. Jim is working in Bakersfield radio.
DiCola, Felix. Unknown
Diego, Rick: KHTZ, 1985; KBZT/KLSX/KRLA, 1986-93; KBIG, 1993-2000. Rick hosts the syndicated show, Night Flight.
Digby: KWST, 1978-80. Unknown.
Dillman, Jim: KATJ, 1992-2007 Jim is doing mornings on Country KATJ in Victorville. Jim spent 10 years on the air in Kansas City before moving to the Ventura/Oxnard market for 12 years and then over to the high desert. Jim has also been a tv weathercaster for most of those years in addition to the radio shows.
Dillon, Lisa: KEZY, 1982-84. Unknown.

DILLS, Elmer: KABC, 1977-96; KMPC/KTZN, 1996-97; KIEV, 1997-2000; KRLA, 2000-05. Elmer, a veteran restaurant critic for decades at KABC Channel/7 and KABC Radio died September 15, 2008, at the age of 82. He had been suffering from a variety of ailments.

Born in 1926, Elmer provided Southland listeners with tips on where to go for a romantic evening, a birthday celebration or a wedding anniversary.

He started broadcasting after more than 20 years with the State Department, where his primary function there was to wine and dine dignitaries in the Middle East, Africa and Europe, while helping move agents in and out of Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. His notoriety forced him to make restaurant reservations under an assumed name to avoid preferential treatment. He took early retirement as a case office worker for the FBI.

After years at KABC, Elmer took a table at sister station KMPC, later KTZN in the fall of 1996. Elmer then left the station in the summer of 1997 for KIEV. His motto was “eat like a prince, yet pay like a pauper.”  

Dills, Peter: KIEV, 1999-2000; KCBS, 2000; KABC, 2010-13. Peter hosts a weekend cooking show at KABC.
Dinero, Al: KPPC, 1968. Unknown.

 

(Cindy Dole, Dominique DiPrima, Rick Dees, and Matt Drudge)

DiPrima, Dominique: KKBT, 1994-2003; KJLH, 2005-13. Dominique was public affairs director at "the Beat" and was one of Steve Harvey's Angels in morning drive until exiting the station on June 17, 2003. She is part of the morning show at KJLH.
DiVita, Frankie: KNAC, 1987-89; KCXX, 2003; KCAL, 2006-14. Frankie is working weekends at Inland Empire's KCAL.
Ditty, Bill: KFWB, 1959-63; KRLA, 1963-65; KFWB, 1965-75. Bill is retired and living in Ukiah.
Dix, Mike: KFWB, 1964. Unknown.
Dixon, Dianne: KABC, 1994. Dianne is a very successful tv and film screenwriter.
Dixon, Glen: KDAY, 1974. Unknown.
Dixon, Mason: KHJ, 1977. Mason has been a long-time top personality at WRBQ, Tampa “Q105.”

DIXON, Tom: KHJ, 1939-43; KFAC, 1946-87; KUSC, 1987-89; KKGO, 1989-98. Tom was part of the Classical music scene in Southern California for 50 years. His family moved to L.A. in 1922, and Tom never left. He died March 13, 2010, at the age of 94.

In 1939 he landed a job at KHJ when it was part of the Mutual Network. Tom worked as a transcription file clerk and as a member of the sound department and, after a year as an apprentice, he was promoted to the "announce" staff. He announced newscasts, dramas, dance band remotes, live broadcasts and game shows. He also emceed audience shows and filled in for Jack Bailey on Queen for a Day while Jack was on vacation. He left KHJ and for three years was a free-lance performer. He heard that KFAC wanted an announcer with a Classic Music background. He intended to stay six weeks, but, as Tom said over lunch during the holidays in 1994, "I was like the man who came to dinner and stayed 41 years."  

After two years with KUSC, he joined KKGO when it was a Classical station. The highlight of his five years at KKGO was the opportunity to host the "Evening Concert" series, which was sponsored for decades by the Southern California Gas Company.


Tom retired in May 1998 at the age of 82.
He told the LA Times, "I feel like I've been beached." After two years with KUSC, he joined KKGO when it was a Classical station. The highlight of his five years at KKGO was the opportunity to host the "Evening Concert" series, which was sponsored for decades by the Southern California Gas Company. For many years his car had a bumper sticker "WAMOZRT," which stood for Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and advertised his addiction. "You have no idea how many people ask, 'What's a WAMOZRT?' And half the time, when I tell them it stands for Mozart...they ask, 'What's a Mozart?'" 

DJ Syphe & DLux: KPWR, 2005-11. The Power pair work afternoon drive at the Hip-Hop station until the late spring of 2011.
Dobbs, Lou: KGIL, 2008. The CNN host's syndicated radio show debuted on KGIL in March 2008 and stayed until late 2008. Lou is on the Fox Business Network nightly.

Doc on the Roq: SEE Boyd R. Britton
Doeblin, Peter: KIQQ, 1987; KHTS, 2006-07. Peter worked for the Soft AC format at Dial-Global until late December 2007.
Doggett, Jerry: KMPC, 1958; KFI, 1959-72; KABC, 1972-87. Jerry was one of the original Dodger announcers along with Vin Scully who followed the team from Brooklyn to Los Angeles. He retired in 1987 after 32 broadcast seasons with the Dodgers. In 1996 he was elected to the Southern California Sports Broadcasters Association Hall of Fame. He died on July 7, 1997, at the age of 80.

(Steve Day, Willie Davis, Carrie Dunne, and Greg Dunkin)

Dole, Cindy: KNX, 1997-98; KFWB, 1998-2014. Cindy hosts a gardening/home improvement show, Home Wizards, at News/Talk KFWB. She also hosts the Rose Parade every January 1st.
Dolan, Joe: KHJ, 1964-65. Unknown.
Doll, Jonathan: KRTH, 1986-91. Jonathan works at Dial-Global in Valencia.
Domas, Pete: KRTH, 1979-88. Pete works as a paralegal at UCLA.
Domino: KIIS, 1993-96. Domino works afternoons at KHKS-Dallas.
Donahue, Raechel: KMET, 1975-76; KPOL, 1977; KWST, 1978-83; KROQ, 1984-86; KIIS, 1984-87; KLOS, 1986; KSRF, 1988; KMPC/fm / KEDG, 1988-91; KOCM/KSRF, 1991; KCSN, 1996-2002. Raechel owns Big Stagecoach Productions and she has produced three documentaries for PBS. She did weekends for Dial-Global (Classic Rock) on about 80 stations and writes travel tips for USAToday.com.
Donahue, Tom: KPPC, 1967-68; KMET, 1968. Tom's legacy is identified with Progressive or "free-form radio." Tom's contribution to radio comes from Jim Ladd's book, Radio Waves: "Tom Donahue was our generation's first town crier. He gathered the villagers together and introduced them to the music of a new breed of wandering minstrels. It was here, in the electronic town square, that we first heard the music and danced to its message. He was the first to strike the tribal drum, and his departure would mark a dangerous turning pint in tribal history." He died April 28, 1975, at the age of 48.
Donaldson, Lorri: KABC, 1967-70. Lorri and Kelly Lange became the first female helicopter traffic and weather reporters. Unknown.
Donegan, Mike: KLAC, 1986-87. Mike is working at WGFX-Nashville.
Donnelly, Bob: XTRA, 1959-61. Bob was pd at "The Mighty 690." He died in the mid-1970s.
Donoho, Todd: KLOS, 1988-2001 and 2002-03; KSPN, 2002-03; KABC/KLOS, 2011-14. Todd left KLOS/KSPN in late 2003. He lives in Columbia, Missouri and he hosts the post-game show for Missouri Tiger basketball on the statewide Tiger Radio Network. He provides sports reports for Cumulus' KABC and KLOS.

DONOVAN, Bo: KDAY, 1970-71; KLAC, 1971-72; KBBQ, 1972-73. Bo passed away April 24, 2012, after a brief illness, at the age of 67. Most recently he had been the manager of Fallbrook Community Airpark. Donovan was also the manager of Ramona Airport.

"Bo was always quick to laugh, and he brought out the best in everyone around him. He totally enjoyed his job as airport manager, and he had a passion, an enthusiasm, that made everybody around him energized and feel good," said County Airports director Pete Drinkwater. "He was larger than life, and we're going to have many fond memories about him and all the wonderful things he did for County Airports."

Bo began a broadcast career in 1964 at KXO-El Centro (his hometown). He went on to KBLU-Yuma and KDES-Palm Springs as morning personality and pd. In 1968 Bo joined KROY-Sacramento when Billboard named it Contemporary Station of the Year. From Sacramento he moved to KMEN-San Bernardino.

When he left the Southland in 1973, he was appointed director of programming for all nine SRO stations. Three years later he joined Tuesday Productions and spent eight years there. “We became the largest producer of musical IDs and promotional campaigns for radio and tv,” he said when interviewed for Los Angeles Radio People.

In 1984 he formed his own company, Silvertree Productions, where he won numerous awards. Active in the San Diego community, Bo served as live announcer for the PGA Buick Invitational golf tournament for over a decade. Bo married his high school sweetheart.  

"His life was not just about being an airport manager," Drinkwater said. "He's done a whole lot of things. His world was a very broad world of interesting experiences."

Don Elliot remembered that Bo was a licensed embalmer. “His last job in that field was embalming Marilyn Monroe,” emailed Don.

Donovan, Dave: KKHR, 1983-85. SEE Joe Cipriano
Donovan
, Michael: KCBS, 1996-99. Michael lives in Vancouver.
Donovan, Sheri: KROQ, 1995-96; KLYY, 1996-99; KCBS/fm, 2003-05; KSWD, 2009-13. Sheri worked swing at "Arrow 93" until the station flipped to JACK/fm. She co-hosted mornings at 100.3/The Sound.
Dooley, "Brother Tom": KHJ, 1974. Tom owned Master Media in Hurst, Texas. He died November 9, 2010.
Doolittle, Don: KABC, 60s. When Don left KABC, he moved to Hawaii.
Dorman, Jeff: KWVE, 2002-06. Jeff was general manager of KWVE.

   

(Leroy Downs; Chet Douglas; Raechel Donahue; and Eric DeWeese)

Dornan, Robert: KLAC, 1966; KABC, 1971: KIEV, 2000; KPLS, 2001-02. Robert's syndicated talk show aired on Orange County's KPLS. The politician is currently an advocate for federal anti-abortion legislation.
Dorsey, Ed: KFWB, 1985-97. The former KFWB director of news and operations is retired and living in the San Fernando Valley.
Dorton, Joe: KBIG/KBRT, 1973-79. The former general manager at KBIG passed away October 18, 2002. Joe was 61.

DOUG the SLUG: KROQ, 1992-96 and 1997-2012. Sluggo, or Doug the Slug, a KROQ fan favorite for almost two decades, exited the Alternative station in late 2012.

In 1992, Doug Roberts arrived at "the Roq" from KZZP-Phoenix. In the spring of 1996 Sluggo joined WXRK-New York and returned to KROQ in late 1997. He’s worked virtually every shift but morning drive and most recently held down the afternoon slot.

Steve Carver, CBS/LA Market Manager, said that the 1-4 p.m. time period would not be filled but rather Kat Corbett and Stryker would have their shifts extended.

Doug is on the 80s alternative-formatted KROQ-HD2 where he holds down the 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. show. 

Douglas, Brian: KYSR, 1997-2001; KZLA, 2001-06. Brian worked evenings at Country KZLA until a format flip in late summer of 2006.
Douglas, Chet: KBLA, 1965; KFWB, 1968-80. Chet passed away December 4, 2000.
Douglas, Gary: KACD, 1995-96. Gary Zabransky produced the Tom Leykis Internet show.
Douglas, Wade: KBBQ, 1968; KRLA, 1971-72. Until 2008, Wade was a reporter in San Diego with KOGO. He now runs an independent production facility.
Douglass, Dave: KLAC, 1981-84; KMNY, 1987; KFWB, 1985-98. Dave is a news writer at KCOP/Channel 13.
Douridas, Chris: KCRW, 1990-98 and 2000-11. Chris works A & R at DreamWorks Records. Chris returned to KCRW in the fall of 2000.
Dover, Benjamin: KFI, 2001-03. Benjamin hosted a weekend consumer advice show at KFI until the summer of 2003.

 

(Nautica De La Cruz, Sky Daniels, Delilah, Doctor Dre, and Danny Dwyer)

Dower, Dona: KNX, 1983-90 and 1993-98; KZLA, 1999-2001. Dona works for one of the traffic services.
Dowler, Mike: KHTS, 2006-11. Mike works at the Santa Clarita station.
Dowling, John: KJOI, 1989; KXEZ, 1990. Unknown.
Downes, Steve: KWST, 1978-81; KEZY, 1981-82; KLOS, 1982-91; KLSX, 1994. Steve is doing mornings at Bonneville's WDRV-Chicago.
Downing, Al: KABC, 1983-87. Al is in industrial real estate.
Downs, LeRoy: KLON/KKJZ, 1998-2004; KKJZ, 2008. LeRoy hosts a weekend show at K-JAZZ and hosts a show at KRML-Carmel.
Doyle, Enos: KMET, 1973-75. Unknown.
Drake, Bill: KHJ, 1965-70; KIQQ, 1973-74. The architect of the legendary "Boss Radio" format in the spring of 1965, Drake consulted stations included KFRC-San Francisco, CKLW-Detroit, WHBQ-Memphis, WRKO-Boston and WOR/fm-New York. He died November 29, 2008, of lung cancer at the age of 71.
Drake, Bill: KDAY, 1974. Unknown.
Draper, Ken: KFWB, 1975-78. Ken owns Ken Draper Creative Communications in Southern California.
Dre, Doctor: KKBT, 1999-2000. Doctor Dre started in morning drive at "The Beat" on August 30, 1999 and left July 14, 2000. He and Ed Lover are working morning drive at "Power 105"-New York.
Drescher, Howard: XTRA/KCAA. Unknown.
Drew, Bill: KWIZ. Bill has an active voiceover career in the Southland.

DREW, Paul: KHJ, 1973. Paul, a consultant to the RKO chain for many years and program director at 93/KHJ in 1973, died on May 16, 2013, at the age of 78.

He achieved much success with CKLW-Detroit and KFRC-San Francisco. In the 1950s, Paul worked at WDET-Detroit, WHLS-Port Huron and WGST-Atlanta. During the '60s Paul worked in Atlanta at WAKE and WQXI, and WIBG-Philadelphia.  

Paul grew up in Detroit. His first radio gig was at WCAR–Detroit while attending Wayne State University in 1953. He moved to Atlanta in 1957 to work at WGST. In the early 1960s, Bill Drake and his wife moved into Paul’s apartment complex in Atlanta.

In a 1977 interview with Radio and Records, Drew described how he left his job at WGST to work at WAKE:   "So Bill and I, one morning, just the two of us in my apartment over probably the best cup of coffee I think either one of us have ever had, something in the water and something in the coffee that day, and we talked about it, and then I went to work at WAKE. The list was 40 records plus each jock had a pick hit. We didn't get to pick our own pick hit, which was picked for us."  

Soon after, owner Bartell sold WAKE. Bill Drake moved to sister station KYA in San Francisco. Drew remained at WAKE, but in 1963, he moved to WQXI-Atlanta where he eventually became program director. Drake's deal with RKO encouraged Drew to return to his hometown of Detroit as pd at CKLW in July 1967.   

Drew was later the Vice-President of Programming for RKO Radio. “Drew was very proud of the fact that RKO only had 2 VPs of programming - Paul Drew and Bill Drake,” remembered Charlie Van Dyke.

Gerry Cagle summed up Paul: “Perhaps Paul's greatest legacy lies in the success of those he hired - Jerry Clifton, Les Garland, Dave Sholin, Guy Zapolean, Bob Hamilton, Rick Bisceglia, Don Kelly, Harry Nelson, Rick Dees, Dave Martin, Gary Berkowitz, Walt "Baby" Love, Jerry Del Colliano, Bobby Ocean, and Charlie Van Dyke - a virtual Who's Who in the industry.”

Driscoll, John: KIQQ, 1975; KTNQ/KGBS, 1976-78; KFI, 1978; KZLA, 1987-89. John has an active voiceover career and owns "The New Voiceover America" company. He recently voiced a character role for Marvel vs Capcom. He's also the v/o of a new national radio show from Heritage Foundation, Ishtook Live.
Driscoll, Mark: KLOS; KIIS; KIQQ. Mark operates a successful voiceover and packaging, creative content and imaging/programming company in Southern California.
Driscoll, Terry: KIKF, 1984-88; KOOJ, 1993-94; KWRP/KTMK, 2000-02; KSPA, 2005. The former gm at Riverside's KWRP/KTMK is senior AE with the Orange Country JILL/fm office.
Drudge, Matt: KABC, 1999-2001; KFI, 2001-07. The Internet journalist joined KFI for a Sunday evening show in February 2001 and left in the fall of 2007. He continues publishing the Drudge Report.

DRUMMOND, Mark: KGFJ, 1988-89; KACE, 1989-2000; KFI/KOST, 2000-01. Mark was production manager and assistant pd at KACE until the station was sold and changed to Spanish in early 2000. He joined the production staff at KFI/KOST until 2006 whenhe left the Clear Channel cluster to join KRBV (V100) as production director. "We had a nice run and made good headway for about 16 months before Radio One pulled the plug in 2008," said Mark. The station was sold to Bonneville. "

The next three years I spent producing and releasing original music projects (they're on iTunes & Amazon), playing guitar on lots of casual gigs, doing the occasional freelance voiceover and production project, and taking IT classes. I'm certified as an A+ computer tech, and continue to study for additional certifications," Mark continued. "The Academy of Radio Broadcasting in Huntington Beach contracted me to give a regular lecture on digital multitrack production last April. I've also been doing contract studio technician and IT work on call for the school. Great people to work with there, and being around the aspiring broadcasters who are training there rekindled my own enthusiasm for the radio biz."

"In June of 2011, I was hired as a production contractor at Playlist 92.7, doing commercial production, helping out on imaging when needed, and various special production projects. working with Rick Shaw, Matthew Rodriguez, and the rest of the staff there has been the most enjoyable experience of my career ... a professional environment with a sense of camaraderie that makes it a pleasure to go into work every single day."

Drury, Dick: KLOS, 1971. Dick has passed away.

     

(Cindy Davis, Rick Diego, Peter Dills, and Dave Dameshek)

Drury, Treesa: KABC, 1970s. Treesa is in charge of consumer affairs for AARP and is based in Orlando.

DRYSDALE, Don: KMPC, 1973-81; KABC, 1987-93. The Hall of Fame former Dodger became a broadcaster for the Angels and Rams in 1973. By 1980 Don wanted to do the Angels AND work for ABC. KMPC didn't want to share him.

In 1981 he left for Chicago to broadcast the White Sox games and was able to freelance with the ABC network. In 1987 he replaced Jerry Doggett on the Dodger broadcasts.

Don was with the Dodgers from 1956 to 1969. His pitching record was 209-166 and he had a 2.95 earned run average. Don appeared in five World Series, won the Cy Young Award in 1962 and played on the All-Star team 10 times. On June 17, 1968, Don pitched an unprecedented six consecutive shutouts and a total of 58.

On July 3, 1993, Don was on a road trip in Montreal. He failed to show up for the baseball broadcast. After a check at the hotel, it was discovered that Don had died of a heart attack. His surviving wife is broadcaster Ann Meyers who was the first four-time All-American basketball player - male or female - while at UCLA. In 1987, she was the first woman inducted into the UCLA Sports Hall of Fame. In 1979, she was the first - and still only - woman to sign a free-agent contract with an NBA team.

Dub, R: KHHT, 2007-09. R Dub left his post as pd at HOT 92.3/fm in early 2009 following a company downsizing. He is now program director of rhythmic AC XHRM (Magic 92.5) and Top 40/R XHTZ (Z90) in San Diego.
Dudley, Bill: KTWV, 2001-14. Bill works weekends at "the WAVE."
Duff, Willis: KLAC, 1963-68. After KLAC, Willis went to manage WHDH-Boston, followed by gm at KSAN-San Francisco from 1969-71. In 1972, Willis joined KSDO-San Diego and then spent the rest of the 70s as a radio consultant. In the mid-1970s he teamed with Sebastian Stone and operated a research firm called Entertainment Response Analysts in San Francisco. Willis was one of the first to use galvanized skin tests to gauge reaction to new records. For the next two decades, Willis became a tv consultant and then retired to write science fiction novels.
Duffy
, Pat: KABC, 1973-91; KRTH, 1991-2003; KFWB/KNX, 2003-07; KJLL, 2010-12. Pat left his post as vp/market manager of Infinity news stations/LA following a consolidation of management positions. He joined JILL/fm-Thousand Oaks in the late summer of 2010 as station manager. Station became 'Playlist 92.7." Pat left in late 2012, following the sale of the Amaturo stations to a Christian-based group.
Duffy, Warren: KMET, 1970-71; KDAY, 1973-74; KKLA, 1994-2004. Warren left his afternoon show at Christian KKLA on January 4, 2004, the 10th anniversary of the show.

DUGGAN, Tom: KBLA, 1965; KLAC, 1965-69. The colorful talk show host was involved in an automobile accident on Sunday, May 25, 1969 and was treated at Santa Monica Emergency Hospital and then released. He entered Cedars of Lebanon hospital on Wednesday, May 28, because of injuries from the automobile accident and died on Thursday, May 29, 1969.

Tom was a very original talk show host who worked afternoon drive during the Joe Pyne talk radio days on KLAC. He also hosted tv shows on KTTV/Channel 11 and KCOP/Channel 13. “He had one blue eye and one green eye,” remembered Janice Jacobson, a fan of Tom’s. “He co-hosted with his then-wife, a drop dead gorgeous Indian woman. He took call-in questions from the viewers, which his wife would write down and read to him and he would then toss off some one-liner answer. The set was bare except for a table and their chairs. Mark C. Bloome was a sponsor and there was a girl named Sandra who was called the Boom-Boom Girl. She would pose in front of her pin fur 1956 Thunderbird and passionately whisper the commercials.” He appeared in Born Reckless from Warner Brothers in 1958.

Duke, Lynn: KHJ/KRTH, 1977-2014. Lynn is supervising engineer for many of the stations in the CBS/LA cluster.
Dunlap, Doug: Doug is a longtime traffic reporter.
Dunaway, Mike: KHJ, 1976; KIIS. Mike works as Ray Dunaway at WTIC-Hartford.
Duncan, Jim: KFOX, 1974-76; KLAC, 1976-78; KHJ, 1978-79; KLAC, 1979-2001; KZLA, 1988-2001; KLAC, 2003-05; XETRA, 2005-06. Jim works in production at Clear Channel/Los Angeles.
Duncan, John: KLOS, 1997-98; KLYY, 1998-99. John owns eSolutions in Santa Clarita.

 

(Wade Douglas, Mario DeVoe, Mike [Ray] Dunaway, Ann Duran, and Diane Deville)

Duncan, Lee: KDAY, 1968-69; KRLA, 1969-70. Lee lives in Seattle and he is retired.

DUNGEE, Ron: KGFJ, 1971; KACE, 1979-87; KGFJ, 1995-97. After more than 30 years in the broadcast and print media, Ron retired to enjoy his life living in Los Angeles. He died November 4, 2013, after suffering for almost a year from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He was 75.

In 1970, Dungee started his broadcast career in Las Vegas as a disc jockey and news director at r&b station KVOV, before moving to Top 40 station KLUC as a dj. He also worked as a broadcast instructor at UNLV, a sportscaster at KLAS/TV (CBS) and a news anchor at KORK/TV (NBC) in Las Vegas.  

A veteran of K-EARTH, KDAY, KKTT, KJLH, KFWB, KUTE and KACE, much of his 30-year broadcast/journalism career yo-yoed between radio news, traffic and his 13 years as managing editor and sports editor of the Los Angeles Sentinel.

Born in Chicago, Ron grew up in Washington, DC and graduated from Howard University. A former member of the Air Force, his first job in LA was at KGFJ in 1971, where he was news and sports director. This assignment was followed by a number of Urban and News stations. Dungee joined the Sentinel in 1990 as a proof reader and was promoted to managing editor and sports editor until he left in 2002 to work as press secretary for Congresswoman Maxine Waters. He worked for Rep. Waters until his retirement.  

Dunkin, Greg: KYSR, 1993-94, pd. Greg left his pd post at Fresh/fm in Washington, DC in the fall of 2010. He's now a radio consultant.
Dunne, Carrie: KIKF, 1989-2000; KMXN, 2000-01. Carrie is a full-time mom to her twins.
Duran, Ann: KBIG, 1999. Ann worked afternoons at KBIG for five weeks. She is now the host of the weekly syndicated radio show, The Weekly Pop 20 with Ann Duran.
Duran, Gina: KIBB, 1996-97. Gina D worked middays at KGGI-Riverside and moved to Laguna where she was in the mortgage business. She is a stay-at-home mom and out of radio.
Duran, Jeff: KLSX, 2000-01; KCXX, 2001-03 and 2004-08; KKZQ, 2005-11; KOLA, 2013-14. Jeff works morning drive at KOLA-Inland Empire.
Duran, Sergio: KMJR, 2000-01. Sergio works afternoons at Spanish KMJR.

DURDEN, Earl: KDAY. Earl was the lead investor in the purchase of KDAY (93.5/fm), died April 23, 2011. He lived in Panama City, Florida and died following a battle with cancer. He was 73.

“I was saddened to learn of Earl's death Saturday night,” emailed Don McCoy of KDAY and chairman of the board at Magic Broadcasting. “Earl had a kind heart and did so much in his life to help others. He came to my rescue several times. I shall never forget when my wife had surgery at M.D Anderson in Houston several years ago, Earl sent his plane to bring her home. When a friend of ours was looking for a cure, Earl again sent his plane every week filled with folks who might be a match to be tested at the hospital. If you ever found yourself in need, Earl was there to help. Nobody gave more to our community than Earl Durden. We will miss Earl dearly.” 

Durden was a former chairman of the Florida Transportation Commission. He owned Magic Broadcasting Company, in addition to KDAY he had radio stations in Panama City and Dothan. He was former owner of several local banks, along with owning 11 short line railroads.

Durkin, Jason: KNOB, 1966-69; KOCM, 1969-80; KWVE, 1980. Jason lives in Orange County and he works with his interior designing wife.
Durling, Lin: KODJ, 1990; KABC, 1990. Lin is the managing member at Artisan Wine Tours. The San Diego State University graduate has been a reporter at KGO-San Francisco, public relations consultant at Pet Food Express and a marketing consultant at Aris Helicopters.

DUROCHER, Leo: KABC, 1964. Leo hosted the "SportsTalk" show on KABC for nine months before being asked to become manager of the Chicago Cubs.

Born July 27, 1905, in West Springfield, Massachusetts, the volatile infielder played for the famed early '30s "Gashouse Gang" St. Louis baseball Cardinals. Leo was temporarily banned from baseball in 1947 by Commissioner A.B. "Happy" Chandler for allegedly consorting with gamblers.

On the brighter side, the "Lip," who once said he'd walk over his grandmother to win a game, was married to actress Laraine Day. He played for the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants, and had a lifetime batting average of .241. When his baseball playing days were over Leo managed the Chicago Cubs, Houston Astros and was a coach for the L.A. Dodgers. While managing the New York Giants in 1951, Leo led the team to both National League and world championships.

He died October 7, 1991, of natural causes. Leo was 86.


Dvorak, George: KFI, 1960s; KPPC, 1965-66; KFWB, 1970-77; KGRB, 1977. George was part of the start of Armed Forces Radio Services. He has passed away.

 

(Sharon Dale, Rich Dalton, and Larry Davis)

Dwyer, Danny: KZLA, 1992-96. Danny is at KUPL in Portland, doing promotions and weekend jocking.
Dye, Captain Dale: KFI, 2003-13. Dale works periodically at KFI. He's a military consultant on war projects. His most recent was HBO's The Pacific.
Dzima, "J.D." John: KNOB, 1977-81; KORJ, 1978-80; KIKF, 1980-85. John was the first md and second pd at KIK/fm. Since 1986 he has owned a printing firm in Orange County.


A\B\C\D\E\F\G\H\I\J\K\L\M\N\O\P\Q\R\S\T-Z\W

Return to Main Page: www.LARadio.com


Send mail to: db@thevine.net with questions or comments about this website
Copyright 1997 - 2014 - Los Angeles Radio People
Last modified: July 9, 2014